XClose

UCL News

Home
Menu

COVID-19: UCL academics mobilise to provide critical advice and expert comment

27 May 2020

As coronavirus spreads around the world, UCL experts are taking a prominent role in advancing public knowledge about the virus by advising world leaders, providing expert comment in the media and urgently researching new ways of tackling COVID-19.

Coronavirus experts

A key strength of the UCL community is its ability to work across disciplines and with colleagues, partners and industry to help address the biggest challenges facing the world today.

UCL researchers are working in the vanguard of helping find cure, improving diagnosis and are advising Government here in the UK and globally. In addition, they are helping to inform public knowledge by providing expert comment on issues as varied as predictions on virus spread, panic buying and stockpiling, broadband provision, and the economic and political impact of the pandemic.

Professor Judith Breuer (UCL Division of Infection & Immunity) is advising the Government on the use of viral genomics to help control the outbreak, and Professor Susan Michie (UCL Psychology & Language Sciences) is advising the UK government-convened advisory group, the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Behavioural Science (SPI-B): 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID19).

Professor Rachel McKendry (London Centre for Nanotechnology at UCL and i-sense) and Professor Ingemar Cox (UCL Computer Science) are leading a team developing rapid tests and tracking systems for COVID-19 in collaboration with the World Health Organization, Public Health England and Africa CDC, while Professor Martina Micheletti (UCL Biochemical Engineering) is working with Oxford colleagues to develop a potential vaccine.

Others at UCL are working on monitoring people who have been tested, predicting the outbreak’s future, and developing digital platforms for community-based care.

Here in UCL in the Media, we feature the work of UCL colleagues who are providing critical advice and expert comment to world leaders and the public on COVID-19 and its impact through numerous appearances on TV, radio, print and online news sources:

  • Is the science any good? Professor Harry Hemingway (UCL Institute of Health Informatics) comments on the likely increase of cancer-related deaths as ‘collateral damage’ following the Covid-19 pandemic. (28 May 2020) Read: FT

  • Avoid using ‘wonder remedies’ As Brazilian indigenous tribes use plants and tree bark to treat Covid-19, Professor Michael Heinrich (UCL School of Pharmacy) advises that whilst some traditional remedies may offer temporary relief, there is no evidence that any home remedies will work against the disease. (21 May 2020) Read: IndependentDaily Star

  • Understanding what's driving market reactions is vital In a commentary about how the lack of understanding about Covid-19 has affected financial markets, economist Gerard Lyons mentions Visiting Professor Paul Ormerod (UCL Centre for Decision Making Uncertainty) and builds a picture of the economic situation facing the UK. (21 May 2020) Read: City A.M.

  • The handbag designer kitting out the NHS Professor Hugh Montgomery (UCL Medicine) has worked with handbag designer Anya Hindmarch to design a holster-style handbag for NHS staff. This bag costs £10 and is intended for NHS staff members to use during the Covid-19 pandemic. (20 May 2020) Read: Times (£)

  • What could cause another coronavirus wave? An article written with Dr Jasmina Panovska-Griffiths (UCL Epidemiology & Health) looks at possible causes of a second wave of Covid-19, referencing the Spanish Flu pandemic in 1918/19 as an example of a previous pandemic with multiple waves. (15 May 2020) Read: ITV News

  • School closures likely to have long-term impact on children Research which has found school closures could negatively impact children backs up the obvious view that “When people don’t go to school, they don’t learn as much, and the longer they’re not at school for the more they don’t learn,” explains Sam Sims (UCL Institute of Education). (14 May 2020) Read: Wired

  • What could cause another coronavirus wave? An article written with Dr Jasmina Panovska-Griffiths (UCL Epidemiology & Health) looks at possible causes of a second wave of Covid-19, referencing the Spanish Flu pandemic in 1918/19 as an example of a previous pandemic with multiple waves. (15 May 2020) Read: ITV News

  •