Strictly speaking solarisation is reversal, or partial reversal, of the image due to gross overexposure. The effect discussed here, although described by photographers as solarisation, is the Sabattier* effect or ‘pseudo-solarisation’. Whatever the name, the effect is easily distinguished – the reversal of weakest densities, and the formation of a thin contour line around strong tone boundaries. It therefore contains some of the characteristics of the tone line effect, but is achieved quite differently. … PDF: Solarisation   Making a solarised print i)  Selecting an image – This should be a bold image with a strong pattern. The image could contain blocks of differing tone or strong graphic Read more

Colour Photographic Printing

  The colour processing that we shall be using is the subtractive method. Using the subtractive filters of yellow magenta and cyan. In practise you will only use two filters at any one time, as a third filter will simply reduce the effect of the other two.  In practise you will only use the filters magenta and yellow. …see full text PDF: Colour Printing   Min Test Strip  Print Size Exposure: Aperture – start at f8, First Test Strip: 5,10,20,40  sec, Adjust aperture to target 20  sec exposure… see full text A ring-around chart for neg/pos colour printing Filtration data shows what  to subtract from present filter settings Read more