Human-Computer Interaction MSc

London, Bloomsbury

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is concerned with the design and use of computer and mobile technology, focusing on the interfaces between people and systems. This interdisciplinary programme sits at the intersection of engineering, behavioural sciences, and design. It combines academic rigour with practical and professional skills highly valued by employers.

UK students International students
Study mode
UK tuition fees (2022/23)
£12,900
£6,450
Programme fees on a modular (flexible) basis.
Overseas tuition fees (2022/23)
£32,100
£16,050
Programme fees on a modular (flexible) basis.
Duration
1 calendar year
2 calendar years
5 calendar years
Programme starts
September 2022
Applications accepted
All applicants: 18 Oct 2021 – 28 Feb 2022

Applications open

Applications that meet the minimum entry requirements will be reviewed together after the closing date.

Entry requirements

A minimum of an upper second-class degree in computer science, psychology or ergonomics or a minimum of an upper second-class degree in a computer science-, psychology-, or ergonomics-related field (e.g. interface design, business IT, product design). Account will be taken of any relevant practical or work experience.

Attention must be given to the instructions in writing the personal statement.

English language requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.

The English language level for this programme is: Advanced. Students who have worked or studied in country considered by UCL to be majority English speaking for less than 3 years must provide evidence in the form of a UCL approved test.

UCL Pre-Master's and Pre-sessional English courses are for international students who are aiming to study for a postgraduate degree at UCL. The courses will develop your academic English and academic skills required to succeed at postgraduate level. International Preparation Courses

Further information can be found on our English language requirements page.

Equivalent qualifications

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from the International Students website.

International applicants can find out the equivalent qualification for their country by selecting from the list below. Please note that the equivalency will correspond to the broad UK degree classification stated on this page (e.g. upper second-class). Where a specific overall percentage is required in the UK qualification, the international equivalency will be higher than that stated below. Please contact Graduate Admissions should you require further advice.

About this degree

Students develop an understanding of the relevance and application of human physical, cognitive, social, and affective knowledge to the design of interactive systems. They learn to analyse and test user performance, preferences and experience in relation to human-centred interactive systems. Students will be able to characterise and apply a range of human-computer interaction and user-centred design styles.

Who this course is for

The programme is suitable for students with appropriate backgrounds in psychology, computer science, or a closely related discipline who wish to develop skills to equip them for future positions in industrial, academic or consultancy environments in the field of human-computer interaction.

What this course will give you

This programme is taught by the UCL Interaction Centre (UCLIC), a world leading Centre of Excellence in Human-Computer Interaction, working collaboratively with industry and the research community. UCLIC, and before it the UCL Ergonomics Unit, have provided training in this field for over thirty years. We have excellent links with industry partners, offer students a weekly industry speaker series and run visits to consultancies and field sites.

Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Assessments are varied and include design portfolios, presentations, videos and reflective reports as well as academic essays and exams.

The MSc research project allows students to undertake cutting-edge research in human-computer interaction. Many former projects have been published and presented at leading international conferences.

The foundation of your career

This degree is highly regarded by our colleagues in industry. Along with developing HCI research skills, the programme allows students to demonstrate skills in presenting, writing and collaboration that are valued by employers. We have a large network of alumni working in London and across the world. Many of them are involved with our industry speaker series and careers events, and they regularly send opportunities to our jobs mailing list for recent graduates.

Employability

Our graduates are employed by technology multinationals, start-ups, government agencies, consultancies and in academia. They take up roles such as User Experience (UX) Researchers, Interaction Designers, Usability Specialists and Information Architects. Many progress to senior roles within a few years of graduation.

Teaching and learning

Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Modules are assessed through a mixture of coursework and exams. Coursework is varied and includes design portfolios, presentations, videos, and reflective reports, as well as more traditional academic essays.

We estimate that full-time students spend 35 - 42 hours per week on their studies. In Terms one and two, 12-16 hours per week are spent on teaching-related activities. The remainder of the time is independent study. Over the summer students can expect up to 12 hours of supervision for their project.

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months or flexible up to three years is offered) consisting of two compulsory 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit optional modules. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), full-time three months or flexible up to two years is offered. This consists of one 30-credit core module and 30 credits of optional modules.

Modules

Full-time

In Term 1 you will study compulsory modules in Interaction Science and Interaction Design which will prepare you for further topics and set the foundations for your research project.

In Term 2 you will choose from a range of optional modules that are designed around the research areas undertaken by UCLIC's academic team and choose a research project.

In Term 3 you will undertake an individual research project.

Part-time

In Year 1 - students take one core module in Term 1 and two option modules in Term 2. In Year 2 - students take their second core module in Term 1 and a further 2 option modules. Students complete their project in Year 2.

Flexible

Modular flexible students take one core module in Year 1, Term 1. They then complete their second core module, 4 option modules and their project flexibly over the remaining years. Modular-Flexible students must submit their project in the year they register for the project module.

Please note that the list of modules given here is indicative. This information is published a long time in advance of enrolment and module content and availability is subject to change.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. Upon successful completion of 180 credits, you will be awarded an MSc in Human-Computer Interaction. Upon successful completion of 120 credits, you will be awarded a PG Dip in Human-Computer Interaction. Upon successful completion of 60 credits, you will be awarded a PG Cert in Human-Computer Interaction.

Accessibility

Details of the accessibility of UCL buildings can be obtained from AccessAble accessable.co.uk. Further information can also be obtained from the UCL Student Support & Wellbeing team.

Fees and funding

Fees for this course

UK students International students
Fee description Full-time Part-time
Tuition fees (2022/23) £12,900 £6,450
Tuition fees (2022/23) £32,100 £16,050

Programme fees on a modular (flexible) basis.

The tuition fees shown are for the year indicated above. Fees for subsequent years may increase or otherwise vary. Where the programme is offered on a flexible/modular basis, fees are charged pro-rata to the appropriate full-time Master's fee taken in an academic session. Further information on fee status, fee increases and the fee schedule can be viewed on the UCL Students website: ucl.ac.uk/students/fees.

Additional costs

Students may be encouraged to submit work to conferences as part of taught modules. Where students are successful we normally provide up to £500 support for conference registration, travel and accomodation costs. Depending on conference location the full cost may be higher than this and students who attend will need to meet those additional costs. Attendance at conferences is optional.

For more information on additional costs for prospective students please go to our estimated cost of essential expenditure at Accommodation and living costs.

Funding your studies

None None

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Next steps

Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

There is an application processing fee for this programme of £90 for online applications and £115 for paper applications. Further information can be found at Application fees.

When we assess your application we would like to learn:

  • why you want to study Human-Computer Interaction at graduate level
  • why you want to study Human-Computer Interaction at UCL
  • what particularly attracts you to the chosen programme
  • how your academic and professional background meets the demands of this challenging programme
  • where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.

Please note: Applicants who have worked or studied in a majority English speaking country for less than three years will be required to provide evidence of meeting the English requirement in the form of one of UCL's approved tests.

Please note that you may submit applications for a maximum of two graduate programmes in any application cycle.

UCL is regulated by the Office for Students.

This page was last updated 28 Sep 2021