Perspective How a Photograph Shows Depth

  Perspective: the impression of depth. Few lenses (except for the fisheye) noticeably dis­tort the scene they show. The perspective in a photograph-the apparent size and shape of objects and the impression of depth-is what you would see if you were standing at camera position. … PDF: Perspective How a Photograph Shows Depth

Infrared

  Infrared, photographing the unseen (or simply create very interesting) images. Discover where a circuit board may be overheating  - where hot water pipes are buried in masonry – and where heat loss is occurring through a building’s’ roof.  This would be an ideal use for infrared film. However: let me quash this myth right  now! You cannot, under any circumstances, photograph heat loss with an infrared film. Infrared film can see the visible spectrum and also the near infrared up to just under 1000 nanometres. PDF: Infrared, photographing the unseen images   Infrared Alert Creative photographer are always challenging conventions and looking for new ways of coming up with eye-catching images. To kick off the Read more

High and Low Key

  The term high and low key refer to the dominant prevailing tones – light or dark – used in a picture. A high key photograph consist mostly of white and light tones and some middle tones, whereas a low key photograph is composed predominately of black and dark tones. … PDF: High and Low Key

Exposing Scenes that are Lighter or Darker than Average

  Scenes that are light overall, such as a snow scene, can look too dark  in the final photograph if you make just an overall read­ing or let an automatic camera make one for you. The reason is that the meter will make its usual assumption that it is pointed at a scene consisting of light, medium, and dark tones, and it will expose the film accordingly. But this will underexpose a scene that consists mostly of light tones,  resulting in a too-dark  final photograph. Try giving one or two stops extra exposure to such scenes. PDF: Exposing Scenes that are Lighter or Darker than Average

Using Artificial Light, Photolamp or Flash

  Artificial light sources let you bring your own light with you when the sun goes down, when you photograph in a relatively dark room, or when you need just a little more light than is available  naturally. Different sources produce light of different colour balances, an important factor if you are using colour films. PDF: Using Artificial Light Photolamp or Flash  

The View Camera

  Cameras and Accessories View cameras come in a variety of sizes, ranging in inches  from 2 1/4″ x 3 1/4″ up to 11 x 14 formats. There are larger models, but those are usually used only for special-purpose photography because of  the limits imposed  by  their massive size and weight. The two most popular sizes are 4×5  and 8 x 10. All monorail cameras are modular  in  design. These can be specifically configured in terms of bellows, monorail length, and type of back and front components to serve  a wide variety of photographic needs.  … PDF: Cameras and Accessories   Definitions The view camera is unique because its lens and back are Read more