How To Calculate your own Flash Exposure

  The Inverse square Jaw The Inverse square Jaw is the basis for flash exposure calculations.  The farther the light travels, the more the light rays spread out and the dimmer the  resulting illumination. …see full text To Calculate your own Flash Exposure To calculate your own flash exposure you need to know two things: the distance that the light travels to the subject and the guide number (a rating given by the manufacturer for the flash when used with a  specific film speed) …see full text Bounce Flash Travels an Extra Distance If you are calculating a bounce flash exposure, measure the distance not from flash to subject but Read more


Types and Technical Data It makes good sense to work with a limited range of well-chosen films. You get to know their performance  intimately – what each can contribute to your particular style of picture,  its response to different subject situations and, when  necessary, just how far you can abuse the film before results become unacceptable. … PDF: Films – types and technical data   Understanding Film …The Basics Film is, very simply, a light-sensitive emulsion on a plastic base. An easy way to think of film is to compare it with bread and butter. Think of the bread as the base, the butter as the emulsion. When you Read more

Medium Format: introduction

Format refers to the size of film that you are using. Medium format mostly refers to 120 film which will be 6cm wide but depending on the camera you are using can be 4.5,6, or 7cm long and even longer which would go on to a large format camera. Our cameras produce negative that are 6 X 6cm and 6 X 7cm. We would advice that you do not use 220 film as it doesn’t have a paper back and can rip and is difficult to load, also some of our cameras are not designed for this longer film, So Read more

Shutter speed and aperture

Controlling the exposure. Both shutter speed and aperture affect the amount of light reaching the film. To get a correctly exposed negative, one that is neither too light nor too dark, you need to find a combination of shutter speed and aperture that will let in the right amount of light for a particular scene and film. PDF: Shutter speed and aperture