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Scanning electromicrograph of an HIV-infected H9 T cell

Starting HIV treatment early improves patient outcomes

A major international randomised clinical trial has found that HIV-infected individuals have a considerably lower risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses if they start taking antiretroviral drugs sooner, when their CD4+ T-cell count—a key measure of immune system health—is higher, instead of waiting until the CD4+ cell count drops to lower levels. More...

Published: May 27, 2015 6:32:23 PM

Saracens players wear patches in games and training

Working with Saracens to monitor concussion in rugby

A team of UCL researchers have joined the ongoing Saracens study for the 2015/16 season, which combines impact sensors with blood samples to determine the effects of concussion on rugby players. More...

Published: May 21, 2015 12:09:04 PM

Chemotherapy machine

Chemo before surgery benefits patients with advanced ovarian cancer

Women with advanced ovarian cancer have fewer side effects and tend to have a better quality of life if given chemotherapy before surgery, according to a Cancer Research UK funded study published in The Lancet. More...

Published: May 20, 2015 1:32:26 PM

Hormones that trigger puberty in the mouse brain

Missing molecule prevents puberty

A molecule important in blood vessel formation and brain wiring is also essential for the onset of puberty, finds new research led by UCL and the University of Milan. More...

Published: May 19, 2015 10:12:34 AM

Ashtray

Smoking induces early signs of cancer in cheek swabs

DNA damage caused by smoking can be detected in cheek swabs, finds research published today in JAMA Oncology. The study provides evidence that smoking induces a general cancer program that is also present in cancers which aren’t usually associated with it – including breast and gynaecological cancers. More...

Published: May 14, 2015 4:05:32 PM

Mycobacterium tuberculosis

New test could identify resistant tuberculosis faster in London

Tuberculosis (TB) disease rates in some parts of London are as high as in Sub-Saharan Africa, and drug-resistant strains are becoming increasingly common. These require specific treatments, and if doctors know that a bug is resistant they can start therapy earlier, often leading to better outcomes. More...

Published: May 13, 2015 4:44:22 PM

Magnified image of liver sample from Hepatitis B patient showing suppressor cells (brown) approaching T cells (red)

Starved T cells allow hepatitis B to silently infect liver

Hepatitis B stimulates processes that deprive the body’s immune cells of key nutrients that they need to function, finds new UCL-led research funded by the Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust. More...

Published: May 11, 2015 4:49:42 PM

Ovarian cancer under the microscope

New screening technique could pick up twice as many ovarian cancer cases

A new screening method can detect twice as many women with ovarian cancer as conventional strategies, according to the latest results from the largest trial of its kind led by UCL. More...

Published: May 5, 2015 5:14:50 PM

CASA_Tube

Connecting places causes mental maps to merge

Realising how places connect geographically causes local maps in the brain to join, forming one big map which helps with planning future journeys, finds a new UCL study. More...

Published: Apr 23, 2015 5:02:10 PM

Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Mummified bodies from 18th century Europe found to have multiple tuberculosis infections

Bodies found in a 200 year-old Hungarian crypt have revealed the secrets of how tuberculosis (TB) took hold in 18th century Europe, according to a research team involving UCL scientists. More...

Published: Apr 20, 2015 11:36:45 AM

Young student takes exam

Emotional problems in schoolgirls rose dramatically over past 5 years

Emotional problems in girls aged 11-13 in England increased by 55% between 2009 and 2014, finds new research from UCL and the Anna Freud Centre. On average, this means that a mixed classroom of 30 children today is likely to contain one more girl with emotional difficulties than a comparable class 5 years ago. More...

Published: Apr 20, 2015 9:47:00 AM

Scanning electromicrograph of an HIV-infected H9 T cell

Human immune system can control re-awakened HIV, suggesting ‘kick and kill’ cure is possible

The human immune system can handle large bursts of HIV activity and so it should be possible to cure HIV with a ‘kick and kill’ strategy, finds new research led by UCL, University College London Hospitals (UCLH) NHS Foundation Trust, the University of Oxford and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. More...

Published: Apr 13, 2015 11:15:06 AM

HIV-1 infected T cell (purple) interacting with an uninfected target T cell (brown) during cell-to-cell spread at the virological synapse

HIV spreads like internet malware and should be treated earlier

A new model for HIV progression finds that it spreads in a similar way to some computer worms and predicts that early treatment is key to staving off AIDS. More...

Published: Apr 2, 2015 7:48:00 PM

Professor Sibylle Mittnacht interviewed by Clare Hastings at The Institute of Cancer Research, London

New role uncovered for ‘oldest’ tumour suppressor gene

Scientists have revealed a brand new function for one of the first cancer genes ever discovered – the retinoblastoma gene – in a finding that could open up exciting new approaches to treatment. More...

Published: Mar 27, 2015 12:25:07 PM

Group of teenagers

Teenagers shape each other’s views on how risky a situation is

Young adolescents’ judgements on how risky a situation might be are most influenced by what other teenagers think, while most other age groups are more influenced by adults’ views, finds new UCL research. More...

Published: Mar 27, 2015 11:34:26 AM

Cold stimulus on the crossed middle finger

Crossing fingers can reduce feelings of pain

How you feel pain is affected by where sources of pain are in relation to each other, and so crossing your fingers can change what you feel on a single finger, finds new UCL research. More...

Published: Mar 26, 2015 5:24:06 PM

Approximate geographic sampling location of donor (circles) and recipient (diamonds) populations analyzed.

Complex genetic ancestry of Americans uncovered

By comparing the genes of current-day North and South Americans with African and European populations, a new study has found the genetic fingerprints of the slave trade and colonisation that shaped migrations to the Americas hundreds of years ago. More...

Published: Mar 24, 2015 5:01:13 PM

Man on scales

Weight discrimination has major impact on quality of life

Weight discrimination is linked to significantly lower quality of life, and accounts for approximately 40% of the negative psychological effects associated with obesity, finds new UCL research funded by Cancer Research UK. More...

Published: Mar 24, 2015 10:37:30 AM

Parliament

Lack of government data-sharing hindering social mobility research

Better sharing of routinely collected data could accelerate progress towards improving social mobility and reducing child poverty, as well as generate significant financial savings, according to a new UCL report published today. More...

Published: Mar 20, 2015 12:41:36 PM

Mother brushing child's teeth

More than a third of 12-year-olds embarrassed to smile because of their teeth

More than a third (35%) of 12-year-olds and 28% of 15-year-olds say they have been embarrassed to smile or laugh due to how they felt about their teeth, finds a new UCL-led report commissioned by the Health and Social Care Information Centre. More...

Published: Mar 19, 2015 12:46:19 PM

The regions of ancient British, Irish and Saxon control in the 7th Century

The first fine-scale genetic map of the British Isles

Many people in the UK feel a strong sense of regional identity, and it now appears that there may be a scientific basis to this feeling, according to a landmark new study into the genetic makeup of the British Isles. More...

Published: Mar 19, 2015 11:14:17 AM

Illustration of how many connections form across mRNA molecules, where colour indicates the length of each connection

Structure of genetic messenger molecules reveals key role in diseases

Messenger RNAs (mRNA) are linear molecules that contain instructions for producing the proteins that keep living cells functioning. A new study by UCL researchers has shown how the three-dimensional structures of mRNAs determine their stability and efficiency inside cells. This new knowledge could help to explain how seemingly minor mutations that alter mRNA structure might cause things to go wrong in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s. More...

Published: Mar 19, 2015 11:06:38 AM

Columbian Exchange

Epoch-defining study pinpoints when humans came to dominate planet Earth

More...

Published: Mar 11, 2015 7:35:01 PM

European Central Bank governing council meeting

Assumptions of equality lead to poorer group decisions

People of differing competence tend to give each other’s views equal weight, preventing them from making the best group decisions, finds new UCL-led research. More...

Published: Mar 10, 2015 4:54:34 PM

Old man drinking in pub

How drinking behaviour changes through the years

In the UK, frequent drinking becomes more common in middle to old age, especially amongst men, according to UCL research published in the open access journal, BMC Medicine. Doctors are seeing a growing number of cases of alcohol misuse among the elderly and this finding supports concerns that older people might be abusing alcohol. More...

Published: Mar 6, 2015 12:01:00 PM