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Hot Works

Hot works are the use of open fires, flames and work involving the application of heat by means of tools or equipment.

 

The sources of heat most commonly involved include:

  • gas/electric welding and cutting apparatus
  • blow torches/blowlamps
  • bitumen/tar boilers
  • grinding wheels and cutting disks.

Avoid hot work as far as possible by either organising the work off site, for example the alteration of any structural steel, or by using other methods of construction (e.g. push-fit services instead of soldered). If hot work cannot be avoided, ensure that a hot work permit is issued by the responsible manager.

Any area of hot work must be actively monitored for at least one hour after completion and the area should be revisited two hours later. This means that hot work cannot be carried out near the end of the day (within at least two hours of the site being vacated).

Hot work operatives working under a UCL Hot Work Permit should:

  • check that their equipment is in good working order and suitable for the task
  • adopt good working practices at all times
  • bitumen/tar boilers
  • grinding wheels and cutting disks.

Avoid hot work as far as possible or have the work done off site (e.g. alteration of any structural steel) or with other methods of construction (e.g. push-fit services instead of soldered).

If hot work cannot be avoided, ensure that a hot work permit is issued by the responsible manager using the UCL Permits form.

Any area of hot work must be actively monitored for at least one hour after completion and the area should be revisited two hours later. This means that hot work cannot be carried out near the end of the day (within at least two hours of the site being vacated).

Hot work operatives working under a UCL Hot Work Permit should:

  • check that their equipment is in good working order and suitable for the task
  • adopt good working practices at all times
  • carry out work in accordance with UCL Safety Rules for Contractors
  • comply with the requirements and instructions set out on the Hot Work Permit, Parts B to E
  • position propane burners at least 3 metres from the LPG cylinder

Guidance

  • Keep the work area clear of combustible material at all times
  • Work with grinding wheels and cutting discs is to be considered hot work and requires a hot work permit
  • All hot work areas should be ventilated and if an assessment identifies the need for local exhaust ventilation it must be provided
  • Be aware of the possibility of combustible materials and insulation behind metal and other non-combustible surfaces that may be ignited by conductive heat
  • Check for voids close to the work area which may transmit heat, flames or smoke to other areas, e.g. false ceilings, under floors, cable ducts etc.
  • When carrying out the safety check 1 hour after completion of hot work operations, check for signs of smouldering hot spots, glowing embers; and the ignition of materials for up to 2 metres beyond the work area (including the far side of adjacent partitions).
  • Hot works on timber framed construction sites should be minimised due to the above reasons.

Last updated: Wednesday, February 12, 2020