XClose

UCL Centre for Digital Humanities

Home
Menu

RESCHEDULED: Open Digital Scholarship in the Humanities #OpenHUMS

23 September 2020–24 September 2020, 9:00 am–6:00 pm

drawn image of people with screens for faces,  'Media Wall' by Ron Scheffler for McMaster University Library

This workshop has been rescheduled but the date cannot be confirmed until travel restrictions are lifted.

This event is free.

Event Information

Open to

All

Cost

Free

Organiser

UCLDH

Location

IAS Forum, G17
South Wing, Wilkins Building
UCL, Gower Street
LONDON
WC1E 6BT
United Kingdom

Humanists are increasingly looking to open, digital methods as an integral part of their scholarship’s dissemination and engagement. Rooted in digital humanities, open source software, the OA movement, new media, book history, and many other areas, open digital scholarship is celebrated for its potential to strengthen academic and academic-aligned collaboration among many communities, both within and beyond those that are a part of the conventional university system and traditional publication methods. As Martin Paul Eve writes: "Indeed, if [humanities] disciplines are historically situated within the tradition of liberal humanism, in which the humanities help to create an informed and critical populace, then should not the amplification of scholarship go beyond those circles? Could such a broader base [...] help to cement the public reputation of the academic humanities?" (Open Access and the Humanities [2014]). Kathleen Fitzpatrick echoes: "If we hope to engage the public with our work, we need to ensure that it is open in the broadest possible sense" (Generous Thinking [2019]). These sentiments are given life via practices such as crowdsourcing, which, as Mia Ridge notes, act “as a form of engagement with the collections and research of memory institutions” and “[benefit]  both audiences and institutions” (Crowdsourcing Our Cultural Heritage [2014]). 

Open Digital Scholarship in the Humanities draws together those who are involved in the creation, dissemination, management, and archiving of open digital scholarship. We are pleased to announce that Martin Paul Eve (Birkbeck College, University of London) and Mia Ridge (British Library) are featured speakers for the event, and that Claire Warwick (Durham University) will act as respondent. This action-oriented event is geared toward leaders and learners from all fields and arenas, including academic and non-academic researchers, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, librarians and archivists, publishers, members of scholarly and professional associations and consortia, open source practitioners and developers, industry liaisons, community groups, and other stakeholders. 

View the Call for Proposals (open until 31st August 2020)

Open Digital Scholarship in the Humanities is supported by Loughborough University and the Leverhulme Trust, the UCL Centre for Digital Humanities, the University of London School of Advanced Study, and the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) Partnership. This gathering is related to previous partnered events with the INKE Partnership in Canada and the Canadian-Australian Partnership for Open Scholarship (CAPOS) in Australia. Open Digital Scholarship in the Humanities is organized by Ray Siemens (University of Victoria), Alyssa Arbuckle (University of Victoria), Lise Jaillant (Loughborough University), Simon Mahony (University College London), and Jane Winters (School of Advanced Study). 

This workshop has been rescheduled but the date cannot be confirmed until travel restrictions are lifted. Once the date is confirmed we will open registrations. Please consider joining us in London for what is sure to be a dynamic discussion! 

image credit: 'Media Wall' by Ron Scheffler for McMaster University Library, resized. Used under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.