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Brexit in the Supreme Court

This is the constitutional case of the century.  Two sets of appeals come together, Miller from London and McCord from Belfast.  If the Supreme Court upholds the High Court decision in Miller, the government will have to introduce legislation at Westminster before it can trigger Article 50.  An expert panel of lawyers discuss the reasoning behind the court’s judgement, public and press reaction, and the constitutional implications.

Starts: Jan 30, 2017 1:00:00 PM

Brexit, Federalism and Scottish Independence

Jim Gallagher has suggested that the return of powers from Brussels not only to Whitehall, but also the devolved governments, presents an opportunity to move the UK towards a confederal constitution (Constitution Unit Blog 10 October).  Kezia Dugdale has called for a People’s Constitutional Convention to devise a new Act of Union.  Kenny MacAskill sees some advantages in a confederal solution, and federalism is a longstanding policy aim of the Liberal Democrats.

Starts: Feb 13, 2017 6:00:00 PM

Devolution in England

Devolution in England was given a boost by George Osborne’s support for the ‘Northern Powerhouse’ and other devolution deals, whereby Councils were encouraged to come together to form combined authorities with directly elected mayors.  Mayoral elections will take place in May for the new combined authorities in Greater Manchester, Sheffield, Liverpool, West Midlands and Tees Valley.  But elsewhere, such as Norfolk and Suffolk, and Greater Lincolnshire, devolution deals have collapsed.  Tony Travers will talk about the prospects for further devolution in England, in an age of greater austerity and growing uncertainty post-Brexit.  

Starts: Apr 10, 2017 1:00:00 PM

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Is Poland’s constitutional tribunal crisis over?

Thursday, 19 January 2017

With one of the judges elected by the current parliament taking over as its new president, and the opposition losing interest in the issue, the political conflict surrounding Poland’s constitutional tribunal is moving into a new phase, writes Aleks Szczerbiak. Although the European Commission is very unlikely to secure support for EU sanctions against Poland, […]

Updates from Canada: don’t call it constitutional reform

Tuesday, 17 January 2017

In October 2015 a Liberal government took office in Canada with commitments to both electoral and second chamber reform. In this post Andrew Cook provides an update. He reports that so far Senate reform has made the greater progress: following the introduction of a new appointments process, a plurality of Senators are now independents. Although […]

Northern Ireland: where now?

Monday, 16 January 2017

The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland has called a fresh Assembly election for March 2, following the spectacular and unexpected collapse of the devolved Executive. The campaign seems likely to be divisive. Reviving devolved partnership government at the end, in a sustainable form, will be difficult, argues Alan Whysall, but is still the only way […]

The US presidential transition will occupy the Trump administration for months to come

Thursday, 12 January 2017

Donald Trump will be inaugurated as the 45th US President next week, but the vast task of assembling the new administration will continue for months to come. In this post Donald F. Kettl explains what America’s unique transition process involves and outlines what progress Trump has made so far. There is nothing in the world […]

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