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Department of Political Science

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Dr J-P Salter

JP smiles into the camera
Associate Professor (Teaching) in Public Policy
Room:
G04, 36-38 Gordon Sq.
Email: john-paul.salter@ucl.ac.uk

 

Biography

I first read modern history, before going into the City and working in banking, where much of my time was spent in regulatory policy development and implementation.

In 2009 I left the City, returned to academia, and took postgraduate degrees in economics and public policy, followed by a PhD in political science. My thesis looked at how British and German banks navigated their complex policy environment: how they managed relationships with their national regulator and with the European Banking Authority, and how they worked with them (and occasionally played them off against each other) in the development of EU legislation.

I taught politics and public policy at King’s College London and at Oxford, and re-joined UCL in 2017.

Since 2021, I have served Deputy Director of Education in the Department of Political Science, with particular responsibility for the development of teaching practices.

Research

My main research interests are in regulatory politics, with two overlapping strands. First, I am interested in the interface between market actors (and, more recently, civil society) and policy makers: I look at how lobbyists craft and deliver evidence to shape policy-making processes (thus, in whose interests regulations are made, and following which priorities), and how regulations then function in practice. Second, I am interested in the design and everyday work of regulatory institutions: their formal and functional independence; their ability to accumulate knowledge; and so on.

More recently, this has developed into the study of the role of narratives and discourses in the formation of regulatory policy.

My main empirical focus is on financial regulation, at both the nation-state and the European level.

Publications
  • Coen, D. & J-P. Salter (2020). ‘Multilevel regulatory governance: Establishing bank-regulator relationships at the European Banking Authority’. Business and Politics, 22(1), 113-134.
  • Radaelli, C. & J-P. Salter (2019). ‘Europeanization in reverse gear?’ in Gänzle, S and B. Leruth and J. Trondal (eds.), Differentiated Integration and Disintegration in a Post-Brexit Era. London: Routledge.
  • Salter, J-P. (2019). ‘The multiple accountabilities of the European Banking Authority’. Journal of Economic Policy Reform, 22(3): 257-272.
  • Salter, J-P. (2017). ‘Book Review: R. Mayntz (ed.), Negotiated Reform: The Multilevel Governance of Financial Regulation’. Political Studies Review, 15(1): 307-8.
  • Salter, J-P. (2018). ‘The Brexit negotiations, from the General Election to the end of Phase 1’. Journal of Inter-Regional Studies: Regional and Global Perspectives, 1: 22-38.
  • Menon, A. & J-P. Salter. (2016a). ‘Brexit: Initial Reflections’. International Affairs, 92(6): 1297-1318. 
  • Menon, A. & J-P. Salter. (2016b). ‘Britain’s influence in the EU’. National Institute Economic Review, 236(1): 2-6. 
  • Salter, J-P. (2015a). ‘Book Review: R. Mayntz (ed.), Crisis and Control: Institutional Change in Financial Market Regulation’. Political Studies Review, 13 (1): 116-7.
  • Salter, J-P. (2015b). ‘Book Review: M. Lodge & K. Wegrich (eds.), ‘Managing Regulation’. Political Studies Review, 13(3): 437.
Teaching

I currently teach a postgraduate module on Agenda Setting (PUBL0027), and undergraduate modules on Policy Making (POLS0082) and Policy and Politics in Practice (POLS0064).

I supervise dissertations on most aspects of public policy.