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Visit to the Institute of Making

Tue, 01 Apr 2014 10:14:53 +0000

We are very lucky to have an Institute of Making at UCL. I often walk past its impressive glass front, peer at the collection of things on shelves that can be seen inside, and wonder what on earth they are and what goes on in there. So I was delighted when a group of us [...]

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New Project – MiCLUES

Mon, 10 Mar 2014 16:52:29 +0000

We recently started a project called MiCLUES to develop dynamic smartphone-based visitor guidance algorithms and software for the Royal College of Music Museum of Instruments.  The aim is to enable visitors to make better use of the combined physical and digital collections and to chart both curated and personalised paths through the museum. The project [...]

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What people study when they study Twitter

Publication date: Feb 19, 2013 3:45:57 PM

Start: Feb 28, 2013 5:30:00 PM

Location: G31, Foster Court

Professor Shirley Williams from the University of Reading will be visiting UCLDH to give an informal talk. All are welcome and there will be a drinks reception in the Arts and Humanities Common room afterwards.

Registration is required for this event: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/event/5560547748

Abstract

The microblogging system Twitter was introduced in 2006, and since then over a thousand academic papers have appeared across a range of journals and conferences reporting on studies of Twitter and its use. Twitter’s open interface means that researchers are able to collect vast quantities of data and we are seeing studies undertaken by large teams in which billions of tweets are collected and reviewed with the help of automated tools, alongside smaller studies undertaken by individual or small groups of researchers (Williams, Terras, & Warwick, in press). For example:

  • Dodds, Harris, Kloumann, Bliss, and Danforth (2011) in their paper “Temporal patterns of happiness and information in a global social network: Hedonometrics and Twitter” describe the collection of 46 billion words over 33 months, and their methodological approach which includes language assessment using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk.
  • Lindgren and Lundstrom (2011) in the paper “Pirate culture and hacktivist mobilization: The cultural and social protocols of #Wikileaks on Twitter” include  detailed study of 1029 tweets collected from 439 Twitter accounts over a two month period,  using the #Wikileaks hashtag, they include in their methodological approach the use of relational text analysis to produce a network from their text corpus describing the linguistic space.
  • Kierkegaard (2010) in her paper “Twitter thou doeth?” considers the potential litigation minefield related to Twitter,  citing cases with legal implications, the paper is not related to a collection of Twitter data.

In this presentation we identify the basic data used within Twitter studies, leading to  a categorization of the data set size. Additionally using open coded content analysis other important categories are also identified, relating to the primary methodology, domain and aspect of the study.

References

Dodds, P. S., Harris, K. D., Kloumann, I. M., Bliss, C. A., & Danforth, C. M. (2011). Temporal patterns of happiness and information in a global social network: hedonometrics and twitter. PLoS One, 6(12), e26752. Retrieved from http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0026752 doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0026752

Kierkegaard, S. (2010). Twitter thou doeth? Computer Law & Security Review, 26(6), 577-594. doi: 10.1016/j.clsr.2010.09.002

Lindgren, S., & Lundstrom, R. (2011). Pirate culture and hacktivist mobilization: The cultural and social protocols of #WikiLeaks on Twitter. New Media & Society, 13(6), 999-1018. doi: 10.1177/1461444811414833

Williams, S., Terras, M., & Warwick, C. (in press). What people study when they study Twitter: Classifying Twitter related academic papers. Journal of Documentation

Page last modified on 19 feb 13 15:40 by Sarah Davenport