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Department of Greek & Latin

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Victoria Moul

Associate Professor in Early Modern Latin & English

Victoria Moul

Email: v.moul@ucl.ac.uk

Research interests:

  • Early modern literary bilingualism (Latin/English), especially in poetry
  • The translation and reception of Latin and Greek lyric poetry in English poetry from the sixteenth century to modernity.
  • Renaissance and early modern (’neo’-) Latin literature

IRIS research profile


I work on the boundaries between Classics and English, focusing in particular on early modernity. My first degree was in Classics, my MPhil and PhD (Cambridge, 2006) in English and I have worked and taught in both English and Classics departments during my career. Here at UCL I have a joint post shared between Greek & Latin and English.

My research focuses upon the literary bilingualism of early modernity, a period in European history in which Latin - rather like English today - was the international language, and in which regional literary cultures conducted in both Latin and the vernacular engaged directly, via Latin, with the literary cultures of other countries much more closely than is the case today. I am particularly interested in the relationship between Latin and English poetry between about 1550 and 1720, though I also work on Renaissance and early modern (’neo’-) Latin literature more generally, and on 20th century English poetry.


Major Publications:

  • Latin and English poetry in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries 
  • Neo-Latin Metre
  • The date of Marvell's 'Hortus'
  • English Latin garden poetry in the seventeenth century
  • Hunting with Hounds in Neo-Latin: the Imitation of Grattius from Fracastoro to Vanière
  • Neo-Latin metrical practice in English manuscript sources, c. 1550-1720
  • Robert Duncan and Pindar's Dance
  • Virgil as a Poet
  • Horace, Seneca and the Anglo-Latin 'moralising' lyric in early modern England

Ongoing and Future Projects:

  • Neo-Latin Poetry in English Manuscript Verse Miscellanies, c. 1550-1700 (Leverhulme project 2017-2021)