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CCHH News & Events

LOOMS OF LIFE – weaving, medicine and knowledge production in ancient China

An international conference on the amazing 2nd-century BCE Laoguanshan 老官山 tomb finds, jointly convened by CCHH (UCL China Centre for Health and Humanity) and ICCHA (International Centre for Chinese Heritage and Archaeology). Time: 30 March 2017, 10–17.30. Place: IAS Common Ground, South Wing, Wilkins Building More...

Institute of Digital Health seminar

Humanoid robots as (indirect) tools for digital health in autism
Time: 20 February, 2:30–3:30pm
Place: Room G01, 66-72 Gower Street
Speaker: Alyssa Alcorn (CRAE) More...

Abortion in China

Thursday 9th Feb, 6–7pm, Room 802, Institute of EducationHealth Humanities Seminar. Speaker: Cong Yali 丛亚丽 (PKU), introduced by Vivienne Lo. More...

Dumplings 饺子 (2004)

Our New Year bonus film, by Hong Kong iconoclast director Fruit Chan 陈果, is 'a sinister story of diet, deception and death'.
Time: Wednesday 8 February, 7pm
Place: IAS Common GroundSouth Wing, Wilkins Building More...

Chinese film evening, 7/02/2017: In Love We Trust 左右 (2008)

Family drama In love we trust (aka Left Right), directed and scripted by Sixth Generation film maker Wang Xiaoshuai 王小帅, hinges on the conception of a 'saviour sibling' for a child diagnosed with leukaemia. The screening will be followed by a conversation between bioethicist Prof. Cong Yali 丛亚丽 (PKU) and philosopher and ethicist James Wilson (UCL) on the issues raised by the film. More...

The Doctor-Patient Relationship in Contemporary China

Tuesday 7 February, 2–4pm, IAS Room 19, South Wing, Wilkins Building. Speaker: Cong Yali 丛亚丽, Professor of Medical Ethics and Deputy Director of the Institute of Medical Humanities, PKU.
More...

CELEBRATE CHINESE NEW YEAR!

China Exchange 中国站 has a great programme of events to welcome in the Year of the Chicken. Highlights include a provocative 'short form debate evening' featuring CCHH's Vivienne Lo (Wed 1 Feb, 6.30pm) plus a documentary film-making challenge in partnership with London Documentary Network', plus a Silk and Bamboo 丝竹报春 concert with pipa virtuoso Chen Yu and flautist Liu Menglin... More...

Chinese film evening, 31/01/2017: For Fun 找乐 (1993)

The first film in 6th generation director Ning Ying's wryly humorous Beijing Trilogy, For Fun (Zhao le 找乐) tells the story of a group of retired Beijingers who set up a Peking Opera Group.  More...

Teaching

Reconstruction of a silk manuscript on therapeutic exercise.

Image: Reconstruction of a silk manuscript on therapeutic exercise. Mawangdui tomb 3, Hunan c. 168 BCE

CCHH is the home for teaching about China, her health and humanity at graduate level. We also offer one undergraduate option. We aim to provide a friendly and challenging environment where students from all parts of the world, and particularly from China, will have the opportunity to develop and reflect upon their ideas together with experts from all over UCL and SOAS.

For more information please contact Dr Vivienne Lo: ucgavlo@gmail.com Department of History, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT

The new MA in Chinese Health and Humanity* is designed to further understanding and develop expertise in a range of subjects concerned with Chinese health and well-being and the impact of China, historically and in the present day, on health around the world. It integrates UCL China expertise in a common agenda to train the next generation of professionals in the skills necessary for understanding and improving conditions in China. Working also with Centres for Medical Humanities and the Institute for Global Health at PKU, it seeks to provide an educational forum that actively promotes free and interdisciplinary exchange as an integral part of the teaching programme.

The MA enrolled its first students in 2012 and is situated in the History Department in the Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences. It forms the educational core of the new Centre for Chinese Health and Humanity, and therefore benefits from the research environment created there. In addition, summer schools in China will offer language teaching and intensive courses in a variety of health related subjects at Peking University.

Training postgraduate students able to think innovatively about the important issues raised during this course and, ultimately, to be able to operate effectively within different Chinese academic, bureaucratic and commercial cultures requires core language skills and a deep understanding of Chinese history and culture as it relates to health. The Core Course embodies the interdisciplinary approach combining: Modern Chinese language, socio-political and cultural history, and a core course which offers Chinese Health and Humanity from the perspective of history of medicine, anthropology, social sciences, law, built environment, climate change, media, sports science and global health governance. Specialised courses are also on offer, and students are able to choose from relevant courses in UCL and SOAS.

Click here for details of MA Courses

CCHH’s mission is to provide a research environment which brings together academic disciplines in the common pursuit of real improvements in the health of China. Our work is also grounded in the belief that there is much to learn in this process from China’s history and cultures of health and well being. We are therefore committed to building networks with China’s institutions, policymakers and educators in order to develop research protocols which will produce appropriate and effective health interventions.

China’s economic miracle in the last three decades has not been matched with equivalent progress in its major health indicators. Investment in social infrastructure, the management of health-care provision, access, environmental protection, and climate change has lagged behind its dedication to promoting industrial and commercial growth.

At the same time the government has faced unique challenges – unprecedented population growth, a rapidly increasingly aging population, new diseases, urbanisation and migration, water and air pollution, and an increasing disparity in wealth between the littoral cities and the rural hinterland. With a population of c a 1.3 billion people on the move and with new styles of consumer cultures, the Chinese impact on our global health is impossible to quantify or evaluate without a broad- based education in health-related China studies. CCHH aims to provide researchers with the opportunities and training necessary to develop original projects dedicated to improved understanding and delivery of China’s Millennium Development Goals as they relate to global health.

HMED3014: History of Asian Medicine
This course aims to provide knowledge of the background and development of key concepts and practices in the history of Chinese medicine, with a secondary focus on the history of Tibetan medicine. It will describe the transmissions of these Asian medical systems and traditions to Europe and the practice of traditional medicine in the modern world. The course will give a broad historical perspective, whilst at the same time focusing on the social, cultural and political contexts of key times of medical innovation. (1/2 unit).

HIST6110: Ancient and Medieval China [and her neighbours] ca 1600 BCE – 979 CE
This year sees the first UCL Undergraduate course on the History and Culture of Ancient and Medieval China. This is a survey course, which will provide an overview of the political, social and cultural history of the territories that we now know as China. From the ancient world of the Shang people, through the foundations of empire, and its north-south fracture under nomadic rule, to the cosmopolitan culture of  medieval times, the centralising narrative of an unbroken Chinese civilisation will be questioned.  Lectures will focus on the diversity revealed by archaeological evidence, the impact of the Han history makers and their myths of the culture bringers, the coming of Indian Buddhism, and trade, travel and religion along the Silk Routes. In this way, we will learn about the changing lives of those inhabitants of the Yellow and Yangzi River areas and the North China plain, and how they were affected by surrounding cultural areas.


Page last modified on 15 nov 11 21:23 by Vivienne Lo