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CCHH News & Events

China’s visual cultures and the Medical and Health Humanities: launch event

18 October 2017, 7pm, IAS Common Ground, South Wing, Wilkins Building. Admission by free ticket:
https://cchh-book-website-launch.eventbrite.co.uk
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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS, CERA-UK Annual Conference 2018

Chinese Education in Global Contexts: Researching the Local, the Global and the ‘Glocal’, 14–15 June 2018, UCL Institute of Education (IoE). Deadline for abstract submission: 15th April 2018. More...

PKU-UCL inter-university module in the Cross-Cultural Health Humanities

An inter-university module in the Cross Cultural Medical/Health Humanities, taught by historians, philosophers and global health specialists from PKU and UCL, will run this week at the Yenching Academy of Peking University.
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YiMovi website – live now!

Our new website YiMovi/医学仁康: Chinese film and the cross-cultural Medical Humanities – is live now at yimovi.com. More...

China's first Medical Humanities summit

On December 23rd 2017, China’s First Medical Humanities summit was held at Peking University, hosted by PKU’s Institute for Medical Humanities, partner department of UCL CCHH.
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UCL-PKU dual degree officially launched

In November 2017 Peking University (PKU) and UCL formally agreed a Dual Degree programme (five-year integrated Master's degree) in the Medical Humanities.
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Order/Disorder: The artist-researcher as connector-disrupter-running messenger?

A UCL IAS Talking Point with Dr Kai Syng Tan, artist and UCL IAS Visiting Research Fellow.
Time: 5 December 2017, 6–8pm
Place: IAS Common Ground
Admission by free ticket from Eventbrite
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Chinese Film and the Medical Humanities: Ten workshops

Tuesday evenings (6.00pm) during term-time, 14 November 2017 to 6 February 2018, Room 215, Foster Court. More...

David Dear

Self-cultivation and the formation of identity in Early Modern China

My research concerns the transmission and adoption of forms of Self-Cultivation and lifestyle regimen (YangSheng) in Ming and Qing China. The field of YangSheng and its conscious self cultivation is located at the nexus of the worlds of medicine, religion and ordinary daily life where individuals seek to negotiate their inner lives with the outer world of shared common reality. YangSheng activities range from choral singing and calligraphy to medicinal foods, meditation and martial arts. Anything, in short, which makes the practitioner feel better.  David Dear.jpg


Though functioning at many different level of intention, the concepts which underpin this, most notably the idea of the manipulation Qi, are widely accepted in China as given reality. But at the same time the practice is and always has been continuously reframed by a particular hegemonic discourse. Currently this largely revolves around the nature of "traditional Chinese culture" and just what it means to be Chinese.

My study is an inquiry into the reasons for the adoption of practice, the methods adopted, their adaptation from historical sources and the conditions which permit or hinder this, and the outcomes in terms of the effects on the individual's health, well-being, self image and on-going relationship with society at large. Particular areas of interest at the moment are the information contained in novels, stories and lifestyle guides or daily life encyclopaedias (RiYongLeiShu) of these era. I am further interested in the claims and uses made for the developing Martial Arts techniques of the 19 th and early 20 th centuries. My work has a strong multi-disciplinary approach, in particular combining anthropological approaches and insights, in order to illuminate texts that are often wilfully, or otherwise, obscure.

davidpdear@yahoo.com

Page last modified on 16 apr 11 22:28 by Helen Matthews