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Order/Disorder: The artist-researcher as connector-disrupter-running messenger?

A UCL IAS Talking Point with Dr Kai Syng Tan, artist and UCL IAS Visiting Research Fellow.
Time: 5 December 2017, 6–8pm
Place: IAS Common Ground
Admission by free ticket from Eventbrite
More...

Chinese Film and the Medical Humanities: Ten workshops

Tuesday evenings (6.00pm) during term-time, 14 November 2017 to 6 February 2018, Room 215, Foster Court. More...

2017 Chinese Art Film Festival London Showcase

Modernisation and the Persistence of Traditional Values in China.
Co-organised by Shanghai Art Film Federation and SOAS China Institute. Tues–Fri during Reading Week, 7–10 October. Admission free – no registration required unless otherwise stated. More...

History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar

The uses of ox-bezoar in pre-modern Japan in ritual and medical practices.
Speaker: Dr Benedetta Lomi (University of Bristol).
Time: Tuesday 24 October 2017, 6.15pm (doors open 6pm).
Place: Wellcome Library, 183 Euston Road, London, NW1 2BE.
Everyone is welcome.
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The Silent Teacher

Film screening, 18 October 2017, 7pm, IAS Common Ground, South Wing, Wilkins Building. European première of The Silent Teacher 那個靜默的陽光午後 (Taiwan, 2016). More...

YiMovi Exhibition of Chinese Film and the Medical Humanities


A UCL-PKU collaborative event, jointly convened by Dr Vivienne Lo (UCL CCHH), Prof. Guo Liping (PKU) and Dr Daniel Vuillermin (PKU). Peking University Medical Campus, 31 May – 2 June 2017. More...

UNexpected London Chinese Short Film Festival 2017

UCL main campus 22–27 May. Short film screenings: 26–27 May. Free tickets from Eventbrite.

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MA Chinese Health & Humanity Dissertation Conference 2017

Wednesday 24 May, 2.00–5.00pm, Room 102, 23 Gordon Square.
Please do come along to support our students and find out about their fascinating research! More...

Emetic remedies in Japanese Koiho 古方 medicine

12 October 2014

A talk by Professor Tateno Masami, Nihon University, Monday 27 October 2014, 6.30pm, Astor College LG18.


Kan, To and Ge (perspiration, emesis, purgation) were the three main therapeutic techniques of the Koiho (Old Medicine) School of the Edo Era. In this talk, Professor Tateno will discuss Toho (emetic remedies), and explore how this technique embodied a distinctive medical philosophy.
Free registration on Eventbrite: http://emetic-remedies.eventbrite.co.uk

Yoshimasu Todo

Abstract

Emetic Remedies in the Koiho (Old Medicine) School in Edo Era Japan

TATENO Masami

The Koiho (Old Medicine) School of the Edo Era is one of Japan’s foundational medical schools, the origin and still the mainstream of Kampo Igaku, ‘Japanese Medicine’. In this school, Kan, To, and Ge (perspiration, emesis, purgation) are the main therapeutic techniques. We can name YOSHIMASU Todo, EMI Sanpaku, NAKAGAMI Kinkei among a few others as the most representative practitioners. In this talk, Professor Tateno will focus on Toho (emetic remedies) and clarify not only the medical technique but also how the remedy itself embodies a medical philosophy.

The Koiho School drew on ancient Chinese medical sources, however their methods, in their Edo form, have particular characteristics that are emblematic of Japanese Kampo Igaku. One of these unique characteristics was the intensive consumption of medicine. Sometimes a patient would be prescribed mild medicines, but according to an individual’s aetiology, intensive medicine could then be prescribed. This process was called Shinshi-jikken, ‘Experience and Verification’. Put in another way, while advocating intensive medicine using vomiting/purgative remedies when necessary, these scholars in fact varied their prescriptions through an empirical process of trial and error. These were men of ‘discerning eye’ who used a process that cannot be understood appropriately without a knowledge of the local reception of ancient medical philosophy. 

Page last modified on 11 oct 14 12:53 by Penelope Barrett