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CCHH News & Events

Acu-Moxa and Qi 氣: a UCL IAS Talking Points seminar

with IAS visiting research fellow Dr Shan Jiang 姜姗, and respondents Dr Vivienne Lo and Dr Nancy Holroyde-Downing. Time: 6:00–8:00pm, Tuesday 19 February 2019. Place: IAS Common Ground (ground floor, south wing, Wilkins building). Further details here.
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Chinese New Year Festivities

Celebrate the New Year of the Pig with CCHH in the Refectory (UCL Wilkins Building, Lower Ground) on Monday 4 February 2019, from 6pm onwards. More...

Chinese Food Philosophy: A Recipe for Life

Vivienne Lo (UCL CCHH), Bee Wilson and Ching-He Huang in conversation with Donald Sloan, Wednesday 16 , January 2019, 6.30–8.30pm, at Asia House, 63 New Cavendish Street, London W1G 7LP.
Book via Eventbrite. Free tickets for students.
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Madness in Paris, Paris in Madness: The City, Emotions and the Insane at the Dawn of Mass Society

A History of Psychological Disciplines Seminar with Professor Jean-Jacques Courtine (University of Auckland, NZ / QMUL.
Time: Mon 19 November 2018, 18:00 – 19:30.
Place: SELCS Common Room, G24 Foster Court, Malet Place.
Registration via Eventbrite:
https://parismadness.eventbrite.co.uk

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Movement Matters: Dance, Kinaesthesia and the Avant-Garde

A workshop-performance event to mark the paperback edition of Irina Sirotkina and Roger Smith, The Sixth Sense of the Avant-Garde: Dance, Kinaesthesia and the Arts in Revolutionary Russia (Bloomsbury, December 2018).
Time: Saturday 1 December 2018, 2:00–6:00pm.
Place:  IAS Common Ground (ground floor, south wing, Wilkins building).
Registration via Eventbrite:
https://movement-matters.eventbrite.co.uk
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Longing For Rain: Spectral lovers and the new urban spaces of middle-class Beijing

A UCL Health Humanities seminar with Vivienne Lo and Nashuyuan Wang.
Time: Thursday 15 November,  6.15–7.15pm.
Place: SELCS Common Room, G24 Foster Court, Malet Place More...

The Cholera Pandemic,Transnational Politics, and the Cold War in Southeast Asia and China, 1960-1965

An IAS Talking Point seminar with Visiting Research Fellow Dr Fang Xiaoping 方小平 and responses from Dr Vivienne Lo  and Dr Andrew Wear.
Time: Wed 20 June 2018, 6–8pm
Place: IAS Common Ground (ground floor, south wing, Wilkins building)
Registration via Eventbrite.
Download a flyer here.
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Ma Kanwen Memorial Lecture 2018

Vivienne Lo (UCL CCHH) will be giving the 2nd Ma Kanwen Memorial Lecture at the Needham Research Institute, Cambridge on Friday 25 May, 4pm. More...

Emetic remedies in Japanese Koiho 古方 medicine

12 October 2014

A talk by Professor Tateno Masami, Nihon University, Monday 27 October 2014, 6.30pm, Astor College LG18.


Kan, To and Ge (perspiration, emesis, purgation) were the three main therapeutic techniques of the Koiho (Old Medicine) School of the Edo Era. In this talk, Professor Tateno will discuss Toho (emetic remedies), and explore how this technique embodied a distinctive medical philosophy.
Free registration on Eventbrite: http://emetic-remedies.eventbrite.co.uk

Yoshimasu Todo

Abstract

Emetic Remedies in the Koiho (Old Medicine) School in Edo Era Japan

TATENO Masami

The Koiho (Old Medicine) School of the Edo Era is one of Japan’s foundational medical schools, the origin and still the mainstream of Kampo Igaku, ‘Japanese Medicine’. In this school, Kan, To, and Ge (perspiration, emesis, purgation) are the main therapeutic techniques. We can name YOSHIMASU Todo, EMI Sanpaku, NAKAGAMI Kinkei among a few others as the most representative practitioners. In this talk, Professor Tateno will focus on Toho (emetic remedies) and clarify not only the medical technique but also how the remedy itself embodies a medical philosophy.

The Koiho School drew on ancient Chinese medical sources, however their methods, in their Edo form, have particular characteristics that are emblematic of Japanese Kampo Igaku. One of these unique characteristics was the intensive consumption of medicine. Sometimes a patient would be prescribed mild medicines, but according to an individual’s aetiology, intensive medicine could then be prescribed. This process was called Shinshi-jikken, ‘Experience and Verification’. Put in another way, while advocating intensive medicine using vomiting/purgative remedies when necessary, these scholars in fact varied their prescriptions through an empirical process of trial and error. These were men of ‘discerning eye’ who used a process that cannot be understood appropriately without a knowledge of the local reception of ancient medical philosophy. 

Page last modified on 11 oct 14 12:53 by Penelope Barrett