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CCHH News & Events

The Silent Teacher

Film screening, 18 October 2017, 7pm, IAS Common Ground, South Wing, Wilkins Building. European première of The Silent Teacher 那個靜默的陽光午後 by Maso Chen 陳志漢 produced by Ging Lee 李孟津 (Taiwan, 2016) — a moving and intellectually provocative documentary on body donation from the perspective of one donor’s family.
Plus video Q&A with the director, and panel discussion with Professor Chris Berry (KCL Film Studies), Dr Vivienne Lo 羅維前 (UCL History) and Dr James Wilson (UCL Philosophy).
More...

YiMovi Exhibition of Chinese Film and the Medical Humanities


A UCL-PKU collaborative event, jointly convened by Dr Vivienne Lo (UCL CCHH), Prof. Guo Liping (PKU) and Dr Daniel Vuillermin (PKU). Peking University Medical Campus, 31 May – 2 June 2017. More...

UNexpected London Chinese Short Film Festival 2017

UCL main campus 22–27 May. Short film screenings: 26–27 May. Free tickets from Eventbrite.

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MA Chinese Health & Humanity Dissertation Conference 2017

Wednesday 24 May, 2.00–5.00pm, Room 102, 23 Gordon Square.
Please do come along to support our students and find out about their fascinating research! More...

LOOMS OF LIFE – weaving, medicine and knowledge production in early China

An international conference on the amazing 2nd-century BCE Laoguanshan 老官山 tomb finds, jointly convened by CCHH (UCL China Centre for Health and Humanity) and ICCHA (International Centre for Chinese Heritage and Archaeology). Time: 30 March 2017, 10–17.30. Place: IAS Common Ground, South Wing, Wilkins Building More...

Institute of Digital Health seminar

Humanoid robots as (indirect) tools for digital health in autism
Time: 20 February, 2:30–3:30pm
Place: Room G01, 66-72 Gower Street
Speaker: Alyssa Alcorn (CRAE) More...

Abortion in China

Thursday 9th Feb, 6–7pm, Room 802, Institute of EducationHealth Humanities Seminar. Speaker: Cong Yali 丛亚丽 (PKU), introduced by Vivienne Lo. More...

Dumplings 饺子 (2004)

Our New Year bonus film, by Hong Kong iconoclast director Fruit Chan 陈果, is 'a sinister story of diet, deception and death'.
Time: Wednesday 8 February, 7pm
Place: IAS Common GroundSouth Wing, Wilkins Building More...

Emetic remedies in Japanese Koiho 古方 medicine

12 October 2014

A talk by Professor Tateno Masami, Nihon University, Monday 27 October 2014, 6.30pm, Astor College LG18.


Kan, To and Ge (perspiration, emesis, purgation) were the three main therapeutic techniques of the Koiho (Old Medicine) School of the Edo Era. In this talk, Professor Tateno will discuss Toho (emetic remedies), and explore how this technique embodied a distinctive medical philosophy.
Free registration on Eventbrite: http://emetic-remedies.eventbrite.co.uk

Yoshimasu Todo

Abstract

Emetic Remedies in the Koiho (Old Medicine) School in Edo Era Japan

TATENO Masami

The Koiho (Old Medicine) School of the Edo Era is one of Japan’s foundational medical schools, the origin and still the mainstream of Kampo Igaku, ‘Japanese Medicine’. In this school, Kan, To, and Ge (perspiration, emesis, purgation) are the main therapeutic techniques. We can name YOSHIMASU Todo, EMI Sanpaku, NAKAGAMI Kinkei among a few others as the most representative practitioners. In this talk, Professor Tateno will focus on Toho (emetic remedies) and clarify not only the medical technique but also how the remedy itself embodies a medical philosophy.

The Koiho School drew on ancient Chinese medical sources, however their methods, in their Edo form, have particular characteristics that are emblematic of Japanese Kampo Igaku. One of these unique characteristics was the intensive consumption of medicine. Sometimes a patient would be prescribed mild medicines, but according to an individual’s aetiology, intensive medicine could then be prescribed. This process was called Shinshi-jikken, ‘Experience and Verification’. Put in another way, while advocating intensive medicine using vomiting/purgative remedies when necessary, these scholars in fact varied their prescriptions through an empirical process of trial and error. These were men of ‘discerning eye’ who used a process that cannot be understood appropriately without a knowledge of the local reception of ancient medical philosophy. 

Page last modified on 11 oct 14 12:53 by Penelope Barrett