XClose

UCL Institute for Sustainable Resources

Home
Menu

Behavioural Economics for the Environment Team

We are a research unit of ISR staff and students who apply behavioural economics theories and techniques to promote sustainable and environmentally-friendly behaviours and choices.

resized BEE logo

The natural environment  is in danger, and one of the main threats is our behaviour. The BEE team focuses on behavioural economics to develop solutions in order to support more sustainable behaviours, tackling climate change and promoting conservation of natural resources and biodiversity.

More on our team and activities: 

  • We develop cutting-edge research using behavioural and experimental economics insights, providing insights and guidance for policy markers and private stakeholders.
  • We train and cooperate with professionals, NGOs and policy makers, making an impact with our expertise
  • Our MSc module "Behavioural Economics and Game Theory of the Environment" offers to our students the chance to learn main theories, and then apply them for their original research projects and experiments 
  • We cooperate with UCL's Sustainability Team, developing field experiments across the campus and contributing to make UCL greener. 
Our team

Our work

Behavioural Economics for the Environment presentation

Dr Lorenzo Lotti gives a presentation in Westminster on Behavioural Economics for the Environment. View the viedo here.


Lorenzo presentation
Applying Behavioural Economics to Public Services
On Friday 14th February, Dr Lorenzo Lotti presented the application of Behavioural Economics to a group of delegates from the Indian Government. 

fishing
Team member Shanali Pethiyagoda presents research

Friday 18th October: Team member Shanali Pethiyagoda ran a web seminar for the Cambridge Conservation Initiative on "Nudging recreational anglers towards more sustainable fishing (UK)". The presentation was based on research developed together with CEFAS, which sought to address some of the marine resource management challenges in the UK's marine recreational fisheries (UK-MRF). The research examines recreational anglers' behaviours, and adopts a behavioural economics approach to design targeted nudges for British anglers towards more sustainable behaviours and regualtory compliance, thereby enhancing marine resources' sustainability. Listen to Shanali's talk here. 


EPEE & SR student presentation
UCL ISR MSc students present their work at Hubbub

Economics and Policy of Energy and the Environment MSc and Sustainable Resources: Economics, Policy and Transitions MSc students present their disserations and Behavioural Economics theories they have learnt about at Hubbub

Hubbub are a charity looking for inspiration on things everyone can do that are good for you and the environemnt. They create environmental campaigns that inspire people to make healthier, greener lifestyle choices. 


Lotti Cambridge

Designing nudges to increase plastic collection in South East Asia (reducing plastic inflow in our Oceans)

UCL ISR Dr. Lorenzo Lotti delievered a talk at the David Attenborough Building for the Cambridge Conservation Institute (Thursday 7th November 2019).

“At least 8 million tonnes of plastics leak into the ocean each year which is equivalent to dumping the contents of one garbage truck into the ocean per minute. This have mortality or illness when ingested by sea creatures and damage to critical habitats such as coral reefs. Most of the plastics ending up in the oceans comes from South-East Asia: behavioural economics theories could help for developing effective nudges, enhancing collection and reducing plastics leakage".At least 8 million tonnes of plastics leak into the ocean each year which is equivalent to dumping the contents of one garbage truck into the ocean per minute. This have mortality or illness when ingested by sea creatures and damage to critical habitats such as coral reefs. Most of the plastics ending up in the oceans comes from South-East Asia: behavioural economics theories could help for developing effective nudges, enhancing collection and reducing plastics leakage".

 

behaviour change environmental