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Landscape Architecture MA/MLA

These two creative and reflective Master's degrees consider interventions in the landscape through imaginative design, strategic thinking and technical knowledge.

About

With design-led teaching and learning, these two accredited Master's programmes allow students to progress towards a career as a landscape architect. Students work to put their theories into practice from week one, researching through speculative design.

Both programmes are committed to an agenda of climate-focused landscape design and environmental stewardship, preparing students to address sustainability and deal with real-world challenges, such as biodiversity loss, climate change and ecological crisis. The core priority of the Landscape Architecture programmes is to equip students with the skills and knowledge needed to innovatively respond to ecological, urban and social challenges through their work with natural and built environments.

In both programmes, Design Studios form a core component, giving students the opportunity to work independently or in groups to develop their own approach to landscape architecture. Within the Design Studios, tutors present unique, rigorous, challenging and even radical intellectual positions, providing a strong identity for students to use as the basis for developing their own approach to the contemporary study of landscape architecture.

Students refine their communication skills through seminar presentations, written work, design reviews and exhibitions. A series of workshops and classes are available to help students gain integral skills, from planting and horticulture to VR and mixed reality modelling. 

Landscape architecture design teaching, for both MLA and MA students, is complemented with history and theory lectures, seminars and readings, examining the interdependence of thought, action and form in history, society, culture and geography. 

Landscape architecture is available to study in two degrees at The Bartlett, taught over either one or two years:

  • Our Landscape Architecture MLA is taught full-time over two years, acting as a conversion programme for students without a landscape architecture undergraduate degree;
  • Whereas, our Landscape Architecture MA is taught full-time over one year, for students who already have a UK landscape architecture undergraduate degree, or an overseas qualification of an equivalent standard.

Apply now – MLA

Apply now – MA


Highlights

  • Work with a team of landscape architects, researchers and built environment professionals to inform your creative design practice 
  • Gain innovative design research skills, interdisciplinary knowledge and critical thinking necessary to address real-world environmental, urban and social challenges, today and in the future
  • Develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of the potential of the landscape architecture profession 
  • Learn in The Bartlett’s unique studio culture, enjoying interdisciplinary opportunities across the faculty and UCL 

Landscape Architecture MLA

This is a two-year Master's degree which empowers students without a landscape architecture undergraduate degree or background to pursue a career as a landscape architect.

The first year is a preparatory year, as students entering the programme will typically be new to the discipline of landscape architecture. The second year has a strong design research focus, with a major design studio project and research project complementing each other and giving students the platform to develop highly developed portfolios upon graduation. 

Modules 

Year 1

History and Theory of Landscape Architecture (30 credits)

A wide-reaching module that introduces and locates the discipline and addresses the history of landscape architecture practice and its evolution in the UK and internationally. Site visits to a range of seminal projects encourage students to think reflectively and critically about the nature of these projects and their historical and geographical contexts. 

Landscape, Inhabitation and Environmental Systems (30 credits)

This module sets out the discipline of landscape architecture in relation to physical and natural processes and anthropogenic impacts, looking at its relationship to resource systems, ecology and climates, hydrology and geology and topography.

Students explore case studies to examine key aspects of landscape appraisal and environmental assessment, planning and design strategy, and the integration of these matters into coherent landscape architecture projects. Landscape architecture detail is addressed, relating seasonality to materials, horticulture, soft and hard landscaping.

Landscape Design 1 (15 credits)

The first of three Design Studio-based modules providing students with an introduction into: landscape and site appraisal via site visits; processes of making and forming natural and constructed landscapes via introductory lectures and design projects; techniques of landscape representation and design processes. 

Landscape Design 2 (15 credits)

This design studio module builds on the work undertaken in Landscape Design 1, developing use of precedent studies, landscape appraisals and evaluations for a specific site.

Landscape Design 3 (30 credits)

This third and major design module builds on the work undertaken in Landscape Design 1 & 2, particularly studies of site and the aims, ambitions and processes of design strategies. Students envisage and develop a landscape design for a specific site using multiple design scales, drawing and modelling it in ways appropriate to the chosen proposal. The module explores many landscape architecture dimensions in depth to reach high-level design inspiration, strategic thinking and technical resolution.  

Year 2

Landscape Architecture Practice and Theory (15 credits)

This module undertakes a critical review of contemporary landscape architecture and the ideas and interests that underlie it. It locates the discipline of landscape architecture within the broader professional realm, both in the UK and internationally. Conventional and innovative modes of practice are explored and students develop critical work on the status of landscape architectural practice and the profession, with reference to selected case study organisations and projects. 

Landscape, Ecology and Urban Environments (30 credits)

This module addresses the role that landscape architecture can play in synthesis of urban environments to help tune and fundamentally change the nature of the ‘urban metabolism’. Innovative historical and current case studies are interrogated in detail to reveal key aspects of their urban landscape context, design strategies and implementation. 

Landscape Thesis (45 credits)

Following initial workshop sessions on research methods and research methods submission, students write a thesis on an area of particular area of interest to them within the field. each student's thesis is expected to use critical reasoning skills to create an argument, supported by graphic evidence and appropriate research. 

Advanced Landscape Design 1 (30 credits)

This is a preparatory module that establishes a site context and areas of interest that each student intends to advance further in the Landscape Design Thesis module. A range of Design Studios are offered to students, each of which has its own pedagogical stance with regard to landscape design and formulates a project brief within the aims and outcomes of the module including:    

  • Landscape appraisal
  • Processes of making and forming natural and constructed landscapes
  • Development of aims and ambitions, intentions and targets, and design strategies
  • Detailed design proposals
  • Techniques of landscape representation 
Advanced Landscape Design 2 (60 credits)

In this module, students use their previous studies and knowledge from field trips to develop a project for a site. They address areas of interest and undertake appropriate research whilst developing a complex, contextual landscape design to a level appropriate to a graduating masters project. Students are expected to demonstrate an advanced level of skill and expertise, further developing selected areas of knowledge particular to the individual brief and site.


Landscape Architecture MA

This is a one-year Master's degree for students looking to pursue a career in landscape architecture who already have UK Landscape Architecture degree, or overseas equivalent. 

Landscape Architecture MA has a strong design research focus, with a major design studio project and research project complementing each other and giving students the platform to develop impressive portfolios upon graduation. 

Modules 

Landscape Architecture Practice and Theory (15 credits)

This module undertakes a critical review of contemporary landscape architecture and the ideas and interests that underlie it. It locates the discipline of landscape architecture within the broader professional realm, both in the UK and internationally. Conventional and innovative modes of practice are explored and students develop critical work on the status of landscape architectural practice and the profession, with reference to selected case study organisations and projects. 

Landscape, Ecology and Urban Environments (30 credits)

This module addresses the role that landscape architecture can play in synthesis of urban environments to help tune and fundamentally change the nature of the ‘urban metabolism’. Innovative historical and current case studies are interrogated in detail to reveal key aspects of their urban landscape context, design strategies and implementation. 

Landscape Thesis (45 credits)

Following initial workshop sessions on research methods and research methods submission, students write a thesis on an area of particular area of interest to them within the field. each student's thesis is expected to use critical reasoning skills to create an argument, supported by graphic evidence and appropriate research. 

Advanced Landscape Design 1 (30 credits)

This is a preparatory module that establishes a site context and areas of interest that each student intends to advance further in the Landscape Design Thesis module. A range of Design Studios are offered to students, each of which has its own pedagogical stance with regard to landscape design and formulates a project brief within the aims and outcomes of the module including:    

  • Landscape appraisal
  • Processes of making and forming natural and constructed landscapes
  • Development of aims and ambitions, intentions and targets, and design strategies
  • Detailed design proposals
  • Techniques of landscape representation 
Advanced Landscape Design 2 (60 credits)

In this module, students use their previous studies and knowledge from field trips to develop a project for a site. They address areas of interest and undertake appropriate research whilst developing a complex, contextual landscape design to a level appropriate to a graduating masters project. Students are expected to demonstrate an advanced level of skill and expertise, further developing selected areas of knowledge particular to the individual brief and site.


Key information

Modes/duration

MLA
Full-time, two years
MA
Full-time, one year

Entry requirements 

MLA

Eligibility Requirements:

  • A minimum of a second-class UK degree in an appropriate subject or an overseas qualification of an equivalent standard. 

Applicants with no prior degree in Landscape Architecture should apply for the MLA programme. We welcome applicants from a variety of design-related or relevant backgrounds, including Architecture and Environmental Design.

A design/creative portfolio is also expected. The portfolio is used to assess applicants’ aptitude for visual and creative thinking and design, and to gauge previous relevant experience. Applicants will be asked to provide a link to an online portfolio of their design work once their completed application has been received and should not send or upload work until it has been requested by the department.

MA

Eligibility Requirements:

  • A minimum of a second-class UK degree in landscape architecture or an accredited overseas qualification in landscape architecture of an equivalent standard. On occasion, graduates from other degrees who can demonstrate comparable abilities will also be considered.
  • A minimum of one year (completed or in progress) in a professional practice placement or internship.

Students who have not yet graduated must apply for the MLA programme (see above).

A design/creative portfolio is also expected. The portfolio is used to assess applicants’ aptitude for visual and creative thinking and design, and to gauge previous relevant experience, both academic and practice based. Applicants will be asked to provide a link to an online portfolio of their design work once their completed application has been received and should not send or upload work until it has been requested by the department.

Application guidance for 2024 entry

Applicants can only apply for a maximum of two postgraduate degree programmes at The Bartlett School of Architecture. 

Application deadline

Applications for 2024 entry will open on 16 October 2023 and close on 5 April 2024. We strongly advise early application, as our programmes are over subscribed and competition is high. 

Deferral

It is not possible to defer an offer at The Bartlett School of Architecture. If you wish to be considered for the following year then you must reapply in the next admissions cycle.

Tier 4 Student visa holders

Tier 4 Student visa holders are required to meet the English language proficiency of their offer with sufficient time to obtain a CAS number and visa.

Accepting your offer

To accept your offer, you must pay the non-refundable fee deposit and decline any other offers for programmes at The Bartlett School of Architecture. If you do not respond within the given time indicated on your UCL offer letter, then your offer will be withdrawn.

Fees and funding


Staff

Laura Allen and Mark Smout, Programme Directors

Laura Allen, Professor of Architecture and Augmented Landscapes and Mark Smout, Professor of Architecture and Landscape Futures – known collectively as Smout Allen – co-direct the Landscape Architecture programmes and teach Architecture MArch, Unit PG11 at The Bartlett. 

Smout Allen teach, lecture and exhibit internationally, with recent venues including the Architectural Association, the RIBA, SCI-Arc Los Angeles and the Nevada Museum of Art. They have been selected for both the Venice Biennale and the inaugural Chicago Biennial. ln 2012 they won a commission from the Mayor of London and the Olympic Delivery Authority for the design of the ‘Universal Tea Machine’ —a giant, tea-making, binary adding calculator.

Smout Allen’s most recent projects ‘Infractus: The Taking of Robin Hood Gardens’, ‘L.A.T.B.D’ (in collaboration with Geoff Manaugh) and ‘Liquid Kingdom’ investigate near and distant future scenarios for cities and landscapes, public engagement, science facts and fictions, art and the environment, agriculture, cartography, model making, model villages and games. 

Henrietta Williams, Departmental Tutor

Henrietta Williams is an artist and urban researcher. Her practice explores urbanist theories; particularly considering ideas around fortress urbanism, security, and surveillance. She is a Lecturer (teaching) at The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, and tutors across a number of programs with a particular focus on critical film making methodologies. Her projects have been widely screened, exhibited and published in the UK and internationally, most notably at the V&A Museum in London and on the front page of the Guardian.

Henri is currently working towards an LAHP funded PhD by design The Bartlett that critiques drone surveillance technologies and the history of the aerial viewpoint. She established and curates The Bartlett Screening Room, a digital forum to screen short films and artist moving image works.

Aisling O'Carroll, Landscape Architecture MLA Year 1 Coordinator 

Aisling O'Carroll is a landscape architect, trained in both architecture and landscape architecture. Her research and design practice addresses the relations between history, narrative, and representation in architecture, landscape, geology, and hybrids of the three—examining, in particular, critical approaches to reconstruction as design. She is currently completing her PhD by design at The Bartlett, funded by UCL’s Graduate Research Scholarship.

Aisling has taught graduate design studios in architecture, urbanism, and landscape architecture at The Bartlett, Harvard Graduate School of Design, and the University of Toronto. She has practiced internationally for several years with design firms and research platforms, including Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates,and P-Rex Lab at MIT. She is co-founder and co-editor in chief of The Site Magazine.

Diana Salazar, Landscape Architecture MLA Year 2 / MA Coordinator

Diana Salazar holds a Bachelor’s degree in Ecology from Javeriana University in Colombia and an MSc in Environment and Sustainable Development from the Development Planning Unit at UCL. She has 15 years of experience in sustainability and environmental justice in education, cross-disciplinary research and managing projects in the UK and internationally. She has written about the political ecology of seed cultivation in Colombia and the Energy Landscape in Maputo, Mozambique. Her current research links postcolonial theory with political ecology, history, extractivism and activism. She is conducting a PhD in Architectural History and Theory at the Bartlett, funded by the UBEL DTP – ESRC. Diana is a Trustee of London Mining Network. 

Diana has taught history and theory of architecture at The Bartlett, Central Saint Martins - University of the Arts London, and Greenwich University. She has also taught in UCL’s Development Planning Unit and the Department of Geography.

    Tim Waterman, Landscape History and Theory and Landscape Thesis Module Coordinator

    Tim Waterman, Senior Lecturer in Landscape Architecture History and Theory, is a landscape architect and theorist whose research explores the interconnections between food, taste, place, and democratic civil society. He also writes about landscape imaginaries from the perspective of utopian studies, and is deeply involved in the ongoing discourse in the emerging subjects of landscape justice, landscape democracy, and landscape citizenships.

    Tim is the Vice President of the European Council of Landscape Architecture Schools (ECLAS) and a Non-Executive Director of the digital arts collective Furtherfield. 

    Tim is the author of Fundamentals of Landscape Architecture, now in its second edition and translated into several languages, and, with Ed Wall, Basics Landscape Architecture: Urban Design. He has co-edited two recent volumes from Routledge: Landscape and Agency: Critical Essays, with Ed Wall, and the Routledge Handbook of Landscape and Food, with Joshua Zeunert. 

      Tom Keeley, Co-Coordinator History and Theory

      Tom Keeley is an artist-historian working within architectural design. His topographic practice works between architectures, geographies, and landscapes, using artistic practices to write and rethink architectural and landscape histories. This research-led practice generates site-specific outputs ranging from writing, printed matter and photography, to film, installation and performance.  

      His work was shortlisted to represent Ireland at the 2023 Venice Architecture Biennale, and has been exhibited internationally including at the Biennale, the Salone del Mobile Milano, and the Istanbul Design Biennial, and is held in the collections of the National Art Library at the V&A and the School of Architecture Library at Princeton University. His writing has been published in publications including Places Journal, The Architectural Review, Building Material, MacGuffin, and Domus.

      Tom trained in landscape architecture at the University of Sheffield and architectural history at the Bartlett, where he is currently completing an AHRC-funded PhD in architectural design studying the architectures and landscapes of the Irish borderlands. Previously he worked for The Architecture Foundation (London, UK), Storefront for Art and Architecture (New York, USA), and Space Caviar (Genoa, Italy). 

       

        Ana Abram, Landscape Inhabitation and Environmental Systems and Landscape, Ecology and Urban Environments Modules Coordinator

        Ana Abram is a licensed landscape architect and urbanist, whose work bridges academia, research and practice. Ana’s research addresses the relationships between dynamic landscape systems, urbanism, and ecological contexts through design syntheses, while engaging with multi-scale processes, from anthropogenic territorial to human scale interventions. 

        Ana is a co-founder of the practice Amphibious Lab, which focuses on dynamic landscapes and their interfaces with anthropogenic environments. Ana has led design and research teams, winning design concepts at numerous international competitions while working with notable landscape architecture practices, including Gustafson Porter + Bowman and Turenscape. 

        Ana has experience in delivering projects through all stages, from concept to completion, including the prestigious Chelsea Barracks masterplan, and the post-Olympic development International Quarter London.

          Maj Plemenitas, Skills Workshops and Classes Coordinator

          Maj Plemenitas is an inventor, researcher and academic. His past and current appointments include the Co-Directorship of the Landscape Architecture MA/MLA programmes at UCL Bartlett School of Architecture, the founding and directorship of the AMPHIBIOUS Lab and the research practice LINKSCALE. He is focused on cross-scale design and multi-scale spatial, temporal and operations strategies, systems and structures in architectural, urban and landscape contexts. For his original contribution to research, innovation and design, Maj received a range of internationally acclaimed design awards and research grants, including the Holcim Foundation Prize. Maj lectures internationally. He also exhibits globally in venues including the Royal Academy of Arts, Venice Biennale, and Roca Gallery. Maj has published on the role of CSD cross-scale design, computation, Growing Islands and resilient shorelines, Amphibious Interfaces and Multi-Scale Flow Maps, and autonomous territorial production strategies.   

          Emma Colthurst, Admissions Tutor

          Emma Colthurst is an interdisciplinary designer and researcher, trained in both architecture and landscape architecture. Her research and design practice explores the interconnections between material movements, ecological perspectives, and urban equity - examining critical approaches to multi-sited and multispecies anthropology. She is currently completing her PhD at the University of Greenwich, funded by a VC Scholarship. 

          Emma has taught graduate design studios in landscape architecture and urbanism at The Bartlett and the University of Greenwich. She has practised with design firms and research platforms, and taught, exhibited, and lectured on landscape architecture. Her design and research projects are featured in a variety of publications and press, including Architectural Design (AD) and Landscape Architecture Australia. 


          Accreditation

          These programmes are professionally accredited by the Landscape Institute (LI). Find out more about the Landscape Institute.

          Landscape Institute logo

          Careers

          The Bartlett School of Architecture is one of the world's top-ranked architecture schools and our graduates enjoy excellent employment opportunities.


          Contacts 

          Programme Directors: Laura Allen and Mark Smout
          Admissions Tutor: Emma Colthurst 
          Programme admissions enquiries: Complete the contact form
          Programme Administrator: Zoe Lau


          Design Studios

          Both Landscape Architecture MA and Landscape Architecture MLA are taught partly through Design Studios. Seven Studios are currently running in the 2022-23 academic year. Please find briefs for each Studio below. 

          Design Studio 2

          Palimpsest Lightbox Study by Kumphakarn Sasiprapakul, 2022
          Retrofit City
          Cannon Ivers and Alexandru Malaescu


          When future generations look back upon the great derangement they will certainly blame the leaders and politicians of this time for their failure to address the climate crisis. But they may well hold artists and writers to be equally culpable – for the imagining of possibilities is not, after all, the job of politicians and bureaucrats.” Amitav Ghosh
           

          What is the agency of the landscape architect when we consider the ‘imagining of possibilities’ for our cities, streets and spaces as we collectively confront the challenge of the climate crisis? Design Studio 2 will explore this question and the urban condition through the lens of Guy Debord’s concept of the ‘dérive’ in order to read and understand the city of today so we can imagine new possibilities for the retrofit city of the future. The studio will pursue speculative scenarios for existing streets, parks, squares, green spaces, fragments and edges that often underperform in the city, particularly in the face of a changing climate where absorptive, living and sequestering landscapes will be increasingly important. Biodiversity and ecology will be a new form of currency and, as Richard Weller writes, “As they do with culture, cities will soon compete to be the most biodiverse.”

          Image: Palimpsest lightbox study, Kumphakarn (Kay) Sasiprapakul, 2022

          Design Studio 3

          Regenerative dimensions of soil, site model, Tatiana Vera Espinosa, 2022
          Feral Landscapes 
          Richard Beckett and Alberto Campagnoli


          This year, Design Studio 3 will explore the concept of feral landscapes through mechanisms of architectural animism – co-creating with socio-ecosystems. The studio will challenge the modern understanding of nature as something outside of us, passive, limitless, that we can shape to our needs and control without consequences. Instead, the studio takes the contemporary position that we are inextricably part of nature and that all its ecosystems and species have agency – they self-generate – and that we need to develop new animist cultures that explicitly engage and dialogue with the living world to give them a voice in new ‘politics of nature’. The challenge is to envision such regenerative futures that co-create with, nurture and are attentive to this life and yet sustain our societal needs, that define new relationships between other-than-humans and humans, balancing letting-go and control. Students will be visiting rewilding projects in the Netherlands and working on edge conditions between London suburbia and the peri-urban towards a London-wide nature recovery framework to wild the capital.

          Image: Regenerative dimensions of soil, site model, Tatiana Vera Espinosa, 2022

          Design Studio 4

          Reinventing the Common, the Fen Tigers Roar Again, Siyu (Yuki) Tong, 2022
          Frontier Schemata: Breach Bridge and Heal, Borderlands of Moving Crisis
          Katya Larina and Doug John Miller


          “All species are distributed in space – but within limits.”1

          In times of crisis our most concrete frontiers are called into question. Either by the need for adaptation or in the face of imminent erasure by new untold powers, these datums are shifted. Often it can seem that these shifts are ‘backwards’. Closing down, breaching or assembling barriers and blockades in a world of technological advancement that we are told should be more open and connected. However, on the scale of landscapes, frontier systems are reacting to the pressure of crisis across a myriad of scales, often in unpredictable ways. The local: In Lancieux, northern France, ancient dykes are breached in the name of new protective regimes against rising sea levels. The national: In the Alps, the border between Switzerland and Italy must be constantly tracked as it melts, blurs and re-forms under the pressure of relentless warming. The global: A virus, adapted to sweep through populations and multiply endlessly casts new light on the fine membranes that stretch across our borders, easily permeated if only you have the right tools...

          What are the new frontiers we will need to establish? How can we identify our belonging to the territory? How do we demarcate these emerging borderlands? This year, Design Studio 4 will set out to investigate these pressurised frontiers.

          1. Lawton et al. 1994, Brown and Lomolino 1998, 1999.

          Image: Reinventing the Common, the Fen Tigers Roar Again, Siyu (Yuki) Tong, 2022

          Design Studio 5

          For the Sake of Peat: A Landscape for Learning and Conserving, Yuelin Liu, 2022
          The Ground Plane: An Equilibrium in Flux
          Laurence Blackwell-Thale and Pete Davies

          This year, Design Studio 5 are exploring landscape as a continually unfolding process, where the permanence of environments is challenged, and their states of equilibrium shifted. The datum for the studio’s studies is ‘The Ground Plane’, both a notion and a physical construct which defines the role of addition or subtraction from an existing mass or body. The processes the studio are interested in affect this line, forcing the balance between ‘above’ and ‘below’ off kilter. The inter-relationship of supposedly natural and artificial processes has been irreversibly shifted. Students will explore the extent of this change, its effects on ‘The Ground Plane’, and unearth new landscape futures derived from a continually shifting or perhaps already shifted datum.  
           

          Image: For the Sake of Peat: A Landscape for Learning and Conserving, Yuelin Liu, 2022

          Design Studio 6

          Draping Landscapes, Dafni Filippa, 2022
          Flowing Between: Landscape Infrastructure in the Anthropocene  
          Matthew Butcher and Tiffany Kaewen Dang


          In this era of the Anthropocene, designing for a world in which human-made infrastructures coexist with natural ecological systems is a significant concern. To this end, Design Studio 6 explores the scope of landscape architectural practice that can exist in the interstitial space between large-scale infrastructure projects and natural ecological systems, which can be seen as forms of life-sustaining infrastructure. Using the territory of the Rhine river as a site – and taking into account the river’s significant influence on European landscape art, industry and environment – students are tasked with designing projects along the Rhine which engage in an interplay between soft and hard landscape systems. As William Cronon has stated, “what makes the Rhine ‘useful’ and ‘beautiful’ have competed with each other for at least the past two centuries.” The studio will explore these rich, conflicting histories and seek to propose designs which reconcile the landscape tensions of the Anthropocene.

          Image: Draping Landscapes, Dafni Filippa, 2022

          Design Studio 7

          Five Ways Uphill, Binghui Wu, 2021
          Altered Earth: Uncovering, Tracing and Recording Histories in the Making
          Günther Galligioni and Christina Geros


          Throughout history, mankind has marked its occupation – both the habitual and the ritual practices that thread one generation to another – into and out of the earth. In studying these earth-works, which often seem natural, archaeologists have uncovered migration patterns and geopolitical relations that stretch well beyond the written record of history. Today, in a world marked by a glut of media, it is easy to forget the lasting earth-marks of our actions; to forget, that we, ourselves, are writing histories into and out of the earth every day. What stories do we want the earth to tell of our time here?

          The landscape of Great Britain is littered with stories constructed by previous generations – some known, some not. When uncovered, they speak volumes about the many, varied peoples who have populated these isles over time. If traced, a line or mound of turf – only distinguishable from the surrounding landscape in the sharpness of its form – may unravel human relations that span across continents and through cosmologies. The material of these stories – soils, waters, plants – allow the deep time of geology (rocks) and meteorology (weather) to penetrate the cast of characters, rewriting and often obscuring the story from view. This allows a mingling of fiction and non-fiction, of possibilities and impossibilities, to penetrate the historical record and our imaginations of ourselves.

          Image: Five Ways Uphill, Binghui Wu, 2021

          Design Studio 8

          The Thames Estuary at Southend-on-Sea
          On the Edge
          Tom Budd and Lynn Poon

          This year, Design Studio 8 seeks to challenge and examine the notion of boundaries. Within landscape an edge can often be hard to define. As future landscapes are increasingly catalogued within digital planes, we will question the traditional roles of boundaries and how these zones could be reinterpreted. Locating the studio within the outer edges of the Thames Estuary, students will explore a landscape of constantly shifting tides, fragile margins and blurred edges, and ask how this context may adapt in anticipation of large environmental changes and development pressures. This year, Design Studio 8 will situate itself on the edge. By immersing themselves in the discovery of physical and invisible boundaries through active observation and interaction, students will speculate on how these edges may shift and define the increasingly uncertain landscapes of our future. 
           

          Image: The Thames Estuary at Southend-on-Sea


          Research

          Bartlett Landscape and Environmental Research: Remote Ecological Monitoring 

          Students on the Landscape Architecture programmes can learn from and engage with ongoing Landscape Tutor-led research. Currently underway is long-term research monitoring, interpreting and responding to changes in landscape over time. 

          The Bartlett Landscape and Environmental Research: Remote Ecological Monitoring project looks at how climate change, management practices and ecological development impact the performance and various functions of the UK’s woodlands and rural landscapes — including their ecological, social, cultural and economic roles. In close partnership with Flimwell Park, this research explores the past and future of the UK’s woodlands through a combination of remote data collection, innovative monitoring and learning from species, materials and people on the ground.

          This research has been supported by funding from Research England’s Research Capital Investment Fund.