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UCL Anthropology

"The most scientific of the humanities, the most humanistic of the sciences"

UCL Anthropology studies humanity in all its aspects: from our evolution as a species, to our relationship with the material world, and our vast variety of social practices and cultural forms.

Our department is one of only a few broad based anthropology departments in the UK comprised of four sub-sections including Biological Anthropology, Social Anthropology, Material Culture and Medical Anthropology. Our teaching and research reflects the breadth and depth of this cross and interdisciplinary approach.

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News and Events

Anthropology in London Day 2017

Tuesday 13 June 2017, 9.30am-6pm
UCL Anthropology, 14 Taviton Street, London, WC1H 0BW

Published: Feb 15, 2017 3:41:03 PM

Obituary for Thomas Quick  (BSc Anthropology, 2006–2008)

It is with great sorrow, that we post sad news about Thomas Quick, one of our outstanding former BSc Anthropology students, who has unexpectedly died of cancer – at the onset of a promising career and the young age of 29. His grief-stricken family kindly shared some memories about Thomas, from which we quote below. Myself and other colleagues at UCL who got to know Thomas as academics and administrators treasure the privilege and pleasure this has been. Our thoughts are with the loved ones he leaves behind. His fiancée Sarah and his family hope to acquire a piece of UK woodland that can be maintained in his memory, with an emphasis on careful stewardship to encourage biodiversity.

Published: Feb 13, 2017 11:16:46 AM

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Anthropology Blogs

Dr. Ludovic Coupaye on UCL Ethnography Collection

Monday, 06 February 2017

We are very pleased to introduce you to a set of six videos following an interview conducted during the first term of academic year 2016-2017 with Dr. Ludovic Coupaye, lecturer at UCL Anthropology. Specialised on the Pacific area, Dr. L. Coupaye explores the history, production, uses and meanings of artefacts produced in this area investigating […]

Our Lives with Electric Things: Call for Contributions

Friday, 03 February 2017

Jamie Cross, University of Edinburgh

Call for Contributions (max 300 words)
In: Cultural Anthropology / Theorizing the Contemporary

Our lives with electric things are positively charged with meaning. Our bodies are electric, our hearts and minds pulsing with electrical activity. Electric things have hope and anxiety, possibility and danger. Our electric attachments are sacred and profane, personal and political. Electrically powered things mediate human sociality across time and space just as they mediate our ecological and inter-species relationships. At the beginning of the 21st century, in an epoch (the electrocene, perhaps) defined simultaneously by the global abundance and unevenness of electricity supply, our electric things simultaneously shock us into action and insulate us from change. Just as electrically powered goods, devices and appliances have transformed our possibilities for reproducing, nurturing and sustaining life (coming to define ideas of the good life) so too have they created new possibilities for controlling, managing, exploiting and ending life.

Recap of ‘Mongolian-Made’ Capitalism Workshop

Friday, 09 December 2016

What forms of capitalism are emerging in Mongolia?  How capitalist is Mongolian capitalism?  These are questions that an interdisciplinary group of scholars associated with the Emerging Subjects project at University College London and the National University of Mongolia (NUM) explored at the workshop, ‘Mongolian-Made’ Capitalism, held at the Mongolia-Japan Center in Ulaanbaatar on November 16th.  […]

Performing sustainable agriculture in the Peruvian Amazon

Thursday, 10 March 2016

Agathe Faure MRes Social Anthropology University College London I conducted ethnographic fieldwork from May to July 2015 in villages of cacao farmers along the river of Alto Huayabamba, Peruvian Amazonia. Employed by an international company providing environmental services, I was to observe environmental programmes through their local implementation in the area. I quickly realised that … Continue reading Performing sustainable agriculture in the Peruvian Amazon

Media Highlight

The trailer introduces some of the topics you will explore in the free online course created by UCL Anthropology 'Why We Post: the Anthropology of Social Media'.