XClose

UCL Qatar

Home
Menu

Library and Information Studies MA

Library and Information Studies Student
Mode of Study

The MA in Library and Information Studies is a one year course available in full-time mode.

Entry Requirements
Bachelor's DegreeFor admission to this MA, candidates must have a Bachelor's degree with Second Class Honours (UK system), a GPA of 3.0 on the 4.0 scale (US system) or another qualification of an equivalent standard.
English LanguageIELTS 6.5 overall (with no component below IELTS 6.0)

Candidates whose first language is not English are normally required to sit an English language examination.

There are no subject pre-requisites for entry, however candidates are expected to demonstrate strong motivation for the subject to which they have applied, via the personal statement section of the application form.

Relevant work experience will also be considered.

Tuition Fees and Funding

The tuition fee for MA in Library and Information Studies 2019/20:

Full-time: 99,900 Qatari Riyals

Scholarships

A number of scholarships are available for successful candidates. Funding is awarded on the basis of academic excellence and financial need. All offer holders are eligible to apply for funding. For further information, please contact admissions.qatar@ucl.ac.uk

Library and Information Studies students studying
The MA in Library and Information Studies at UCL Qatar was the first degree programme of its kind in the region to be formally accredited by CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

The MA in Library and Information Studies at UCL Qatar provides access to a world class programme. UCL established the first programme in librarianship in the UK in 1919. The unique strength of the UCL Qatar programme is the possibility to specialise according to a student's specific interests in management and leadership in libraries, Arabic and Islamic librarianship or librarianship for the education sector. Students develop as leading professionals through research-based learning and international work-placement opportunities.

Course structure

The programme has a total value of 180 credits. It is comprised of three core modules (45 credits). Students select one specialist pathway to follow which provides three additional core modules (45 credits). Students choose two additional modules, either from another specialism or the list of optional modules (30 credits). Finally students complete a dissertation (60 credits).

Compulsory Modules

Reference and Information Service
This course prepares students to provide quality reference support to the public and scholars through a thorough introduction to information resources in print and digital format.  Students also learn about the control, recording and exchange of published information, including patterns of dissemination and control of the literature of specific subjects. The structure, content and purpose of a range of publication formats, including guides to information sources, directories, terminological tools, factual reference sources, tools for serials control, bibliographies, indexing and abstracting services, library catalogues and union lists, and resources for the bibliographic control of specialized forms such as non-book materials, archives and official publications are also covered. Students will learn how to interrogate such resources to identify appropriate content for a variety of study, enquiry and research purposes. The module will be taught via seminars and practical work in examining sources in a variety of printed and electronic formats. Coursework will include a critical review of an information source and an annotated bibliography essay.
Knowledge Organisation and Access

Brief history of catalogue codes, in order to familiarize students with catalogues compiled under older rules and with the developing concepts of knowledge organisation. Development of International Standard Bibliographic Description (ISBD) and Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR); nature and structure of AACR2 and Resource Description and Access (RDA); practical descriptive cataloguing; development of MARC format; practical cataloguing using MARC 21 format; nature of online catalogues and problems that arise in using them; cataloguing of Web resources; metadata; OPACs. Intellectual organization of knowledge and the physical arrangement of documents; principles underlying the design and construction of subject indexing tools; factors affecting subject access to documents both in physical and digital environments; how to identify the semantic content of documents; practical work in application of standards for subject description, specifically Library of Congress Subject Headings, Dewey Decimal Classification, Universal Decimal Classification (UDC), and Library of Congress classification schemes. There will also be an introduction to Dublin Core, Metadata Object Description Schema (MODS), Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), Resource Description Framework (RDF), and Bibframe. The module will be taught via lectures and practical classes. Coursework will include a policy document, short essay and various pieces of practical work.

Research Methods in Information and Library Science

This course offers an overview of multi-disciplinary research methods used for the study of museums, libraries and other cultural heritage institutions. Students will be introduced to different research methods and types of data sources employed in scholarly museum, library and cultural heritage research. They will be invited to consider the strengths and weaknesses of these methods and consider their effectiveness when critically studying practice - in museums, libraries, and other heritage institutions. The aim of this module is to introduce students to different methods of documentation and critical assessment of museum and heritage practice, from the different vantage points of a number of overlapping disciplines and methodologies that have engaged with heritage practice. Each lecture and seminar aims to present a method, which is presented in a way that allows the students to understand how museum and critical heritage theory is shaped by practice.

The final goal of the module is to prepare students for the primary research that they will conduct in the context of other assignments or their dissertation, by also helping them define the best methodologies for their dissertation questions.

Dissertation

The dissertation is a piece of extended academic writing of 12,000 words. The dissertation element provides the students with the opportunity to pursue research according to an agenda of their own devising, on a topic relevant to the Master's degree and decided in discussion with the Degree and Module Coordinators in Term 2. The Degree and Module Coordinators will advise on topics and suggest relevant supervisors and advisors. The dissertation allows students to utilise theoretical frameworks and methodologies learned through the Master's degree, to develop data analysis skills and to explore in detail relevant topics of personal interest. These topics may be related to their placement, their place of work, and may act as a starting point for further PhD research.

 

Specialist Pathways

Our programme offers students the unique opportunity to specialise in one of four specific fields of librarianship: Leadership and Management in Libraries; Librarianship for the Education Sector; Middle Eastern Librarianship; and Archives, Records and Data Management. Students are strongly encouraged to select a specialism that best matches their interests.

This table summarises the modules for each specialist pathway;

Table showing specialist pathway list of modules
Cultural Institutions Management

This course covers principal aspects of management including professional ethics and responsibilities; change management and strategic planning; appraisal and behavioural management; finance and budgeting; legal issues, marketing and promotion of services. Key management skills, team work, business writing, presentation and project management are developed. By the end of the course students will be able to identify a range of management skills relevant to the development and delivery of services in a library and information service context. They will be aware of the main areas of human resource management and of the management implications of a number of current issues affecting library and information service provision. Students will be able to apply a range of key management skills both within their studies and in the professional context. The module will be taught via lectures, practical exercises, group projects, presentations, seminars and practical work. Coursework will include a group presentation and a management briefing report.

Library Collection Management

This course considers the development and monitoring of collection development, retention and preservation policies. Selection and acquisition principles, methods and processes; security policies and planning; storage policies and planning; use and users; evaluation and retention of collections; preservation strategies and programmes, including substitution options and methods, risk assessment and control, collection care and an overview of conservation options. Issues relating to acquisition, access and preservation of electronic material and special issues relating to serials, interlibrary loan and document supply, financial issues, co-operation and resource sharing will be discussed. The module will be taught via lectures and discussions. Coursework will include a policy document and essay.

Collections Care and Management

This course will examine the care and management of museum collections in detail. This course will provide students with a solid foundation in the theory and practice of collections care and management by covering a variety of topics, including the documentation of objects and collections; collections management systems; agents of deterioration; environmental monitoring; evaluation of microenvironment and its effect on collections; preventive conservation; remedial conservation; pest management; risk assessment and management; disaster planning; security; managing loans; managing museum collections and storages; and widening access to collections. On completion, students will have a holistic understanding of the principles of collections care and management.

Librarianship for the Education Sector

Cultural Institutions Management

This course covers principal aspects of management including professional ethics and responsibilities; change management and strategic planning; appraisal and behavioural management; finance and budgeting; legal issues, marketing and promotion of services. Key management skills, team work, business writing, presentation and project management are developed. By the end of the course students will be able to identify a range of management skills relevant to the development and delivery of services in a library and information service context. They will be aware of the main areas of human resource management and of the management implications of a number of current issues affecting library and information service provision. Students will be able to apply a range of key management skills both within their studies and in the professional context. The module will be taught via lectures, practical exercises, group projects, presentations, seminars and practical work. Coursework will include a group presentation and a management briefing report.

Information Literacy

This module teaches students about the theories and concepts surrounding information literacy, a core skill needed for lifelong learning. This subject allows students to gain an understanding of the key theories and concepts surrounding information literacy and teaching and learning and learn the practical skills and knowledge needed to teach and promote information literacy in a range of contexts including workplaces, communities and educational institutions. The content of the course includes the following: definitions of information literacy and other literacies, including digital and visual; range of information literacy provision in schools, colleges, and universities, public libraries, health sector, and workplaces. The module will be taught via lectures and practical classes. Coursework will include an essay and report based on a practical project.

Services to children and young people

This course introduces the issues involved, skills required and principles underlying the provision of services to children and young people through school and public libraries. It seeks to build the students' personal and transferable skills and competencies to meet the demands of a changing professional environment. Children and school Librarians have a significant role in enabling young people as independent and lifelong learners. Principal aspects covered include the impact of education, technological and political developments; understanding of child development; children's reading, literacy and information skills; the nature of children's literature; application and implications of ICT; assessment of stock, including illustration, non-book materials, selection and censorship issues; provision of resources for particular client-groups including special needs; the role of the School Library Support service; design of services and facilities for client-groups; promotion of libraries, literacy and reading enthusiasm. This module is a short course comprised of lectures and group work. The coursework will include a review exercise, case report and essay.

Middle Eastern Librarianship

Introduction to Archives and Preservation

Students will learn the basic skills and techniques of managing archives, both print and digital, along with the principles and practice of preservation, conservation management and collection care for library and archive material. Instruction will be by lectures, visits to local archives (Qatar National Library, Museum of Islamic Art, private collections), talks by visiting experts in archive management and in conservation. The module will provide students with basic skills to start or manage an archive and with basic skill in preservation and conservation. Those skills, along with the management and marketing skills they will learn can also be used for general or special collections. Coursework will include project work on an archive as well as an essay.

Arabic Cataloguing

This module will introduce students to the tools necessary for cataloguing materials in Arabic. They will be introduced to RDA and MARC21 in Arabic, to Arabic name authority files, to special problems in cataloguing books in Arabic and to cataloguing Arabic manuscripts. It will benefit experienced cataloguers who deal primarily with Arabic materials and help those new to Arabic cataloguing to work with Arabic materials.

Islamic Manuscripts

The manuscript tradition continued in Islamic countries until well into the 20th century. Manuscripts continue to be of great importance in understanding the culture and traditions of the region. This course provides a foundation in the skills and knowledge necessary to understand and work with Islamic manuscripts. Students will learn about material surfaces, inks and writing implements, common scripts, page layout, ornamentation, and bookbinding. The manuscript will be considered as both a physical object and as a medium in the transmission of culture. The course assessments will include an essay and a practical exercise involving primary texts, their description, interpretation and contextualization.

Archives, Records and Data Management

Introduction to Archives and Preservation

Students will learn the basic skills and techniques of managing archives, both print and digital, along with the principles and practice of preservation, conservation management and collection care for library and archive material. Instruction will be by lectures, visits to local archives (Qatar National Library, Museum of Islamic Art, private collections), talks by visiting experts in archive management and in conservation. The module will provide students with basic skills to start or manage an archive and with basic skill in preservation and conservation. Those skills, along with the management and marketing skills they will learn can also be used for general or special collections. Coursework will include project work on an archive as well as an essay.

Metadata and Data Management

The module introduces the basic concepts and current solutions of data management and digital preservation. It will present the range of strategies for digital preservation, curation, and data management (digital archaeology, simulation, media transfer and renewal, migration, self-preserving objects), lifecycle models of digital objects, infrastructures and popular tools supporting preservation and curation. The module will also examine areas of current research work related to data management and preservation..

Library Systems and Data Management

In this course students will be introduced to metadata creation, the importance of standards in data interchange, XML, content management systems, data management systems, integrated library management systems, open access concepts and open source systems. They will also learn about linked data, digital curation, Web and data analytics and metrics. Library technology and research methods have changed rapidly in the past decade and new skills, particularly in data management and the creation of institutional repositories of data, text, and images are in particular demand. This course will give students an understanding of current technologies and tools to curate and disseminate knowledge and provide access to re-sources held locally or globally.

Additional Optional Modules

Subject to availability and demand, options may include:
Professional Awareness

To foster awareness of professional identity and of the purpose and role of the professional librarian; to encourage a broad view of the professional skills as applicable to a variety of employment sectors; to promote an understanding of the relationships between the other courses in the programme; to identify pervasive trends in the profession; to promote awareness of current social and political issues; to support a critical and analytical approach to professional activity. The aim of the case study is to relate the theoretical knowledge acquired through the core courses of the programme to a specific real-life situation.

This is not an internship but an opportunity for those new to the profession to observe and learn at first hand its various operations and for those experienced in the profession to observe and learn new methods, procedures, and environments.

Previous work placements have included:
  • Berkeley University of California, USA
  • Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale, Firenze, Italy
  • British Library, London, United Kingdom
  • Hong Kong Central Library, Hong Long
  • Imperial College London, United Kingdom
  • Koc University Library, Turkey
  • Lingnan University, Hong Kong
  • Max Planck Digital Librar, Germany
  • Museum of Islamic Art Library, Doha, Qatar
  • National Library Singapore
  • Northwestern University in Qatar
  • Oregon State University, USA
  • Qatar National Library, Doha, Qatar
  • Qatar University Library, Doha, Qatar
  • Sabanci University, Turkey
  • Texas A&M University at Qatar
  • The Library of Congress, Washington, USA
  • UCL Institute of Archaeology Library, London, United Kingdom
  • University of Illinois Library, USA
  • Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, Doha, Qatar
  • Yale University Library, USA

Library and Information Studies Work Placements
 
The Book of the World

This module covers the purpose and use of bibliography and a brief history of its main proponents; the technique and the history of printing from the hand-press period to the digital era; the technique and history of vellum and paper making; the history of book production and illustration; the technique and history of bookbinding, including materials and processes, styles and designs of decoration, owners and collectors. Although the course focuses on European books it also surveys the history of the book in China, India and Muslim lands and considers the book as a physical and cultural object.

 

Students will work on physical volumes of 18th and 19th century text and examine collation, binding, type, and paper. They will do page facsimiles of title pages of the books they work with and do a MARC record that would be up to rare book and RDA standards. They will also prepare descriptive records for a number of titles that will demonstrate their ability to research a text and provide information about its author, publishers, printers, and uniqueness.

Digital Cultural Heritage

This module discusses realities, developments and challenges in the area of digital cultural heritage. It addresses the emerging role of digital cultural heritage organisations in creating, preserving, researching, offering, sharing and disseminating digital information and applications related to heritage documents, objects, collections and exhibitions. The module reflects on digital media holistically by combining a critical and theoretical study of the role of digital media in cultural heritage institutions. It investigates policies and strategies, interactives, digital curation, online heritage presences (such as online museums, galleries and collections) and the use of social media to engage with audiences. Other issues include usability and accessibility in the digital world, online communities, user generated content and Big Data, personalisation, and the future of digital cultural heritage.

Information Visualisation

This module introduces the fundamental principles and practical tools in the area of Information Visualisation focusing on the use of graphical techniques to present data; within the concept of this module the focus would be on use of information visualization for representing library and museum information. The module will provide the necessary context from relevant research in data structures, human-computer interaction, human information behavior and cognitive psychology, cartography, interactive graphics, imaging and visual design. The module will present modern tools for developing infographics, georeferencing, timelines, and other representations relevant to the cultural heritage domains.

Why choose UCL Qatar

 

UCL Qatar Student Library


Students at UCL Qatar benefit from truly exceptional facilities including advanced and highly equipped teaching spaces. UCL Qatar is rapidly building an extensive publications collection focussing on cultural heritage, librarianship and information studies. Dedicated IT and library professionals are on hand to support students, in addition to academic and teaching staff.

Qatar is investing heavily in its libraries infrastructure and capacity building. This is an exceptionally exciting period for students and professionals who are looking to develop their career in the region.

Students at UCL Qatar benefit from outstanding facilities, including advanced and highly-equipped teaching spaces. Dedicated IT and library professionals are on hand to support students, in addition to academic and teaching staff.

 

Widget Placeholderhttps://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4236/35276454222_e389e0ac1f_c.jpg;https://...