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Past events 

 

Annual Lecture with Baker & McKenzie LLP 2014:
Investment Treaty Arbitration: An International Lawyer's Perspective

14 May 2014

Judge Abdulqawi Yusuf
International Court of Justice 
About the speaker: Judge Abdulqawi Ahmed Yusuf is Juris Doctor from Somali National University and holds a PhD from the Graduate Institute (1980). Prior to his doctorate, he completed post-graduate studies in international law at the University of Florence (Italy). From 1975 to 1980, Dr Yusuf served as Somalia’s delegate to the Third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea.

He was Lecturer at the Somali National University from 1974 to 1981 and at the University of Geneva from 1981 to 1983. He has also been guest professor and lecturer at a number of universities and institutes in Switzerland, Italy, Greece and France. From 1987 to 1992, Dr Abdulqawi Ahmed Yusuf was Chief of the Legal Policies Service of United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) before becoming its Representative and Head of its New York Office from 1992 to 1994.

From 1994 to 2001, he served as Legal Advisor (up to 1998), then Assistant Director for African Affairs to United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) in Vienna. From March 2001 to January 2009, Dr Yusuf was Legal Adviser and Director of the Office of International Standards and Legal Affairs for United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

As of February 6, 2009, he had been a judge at the International Court of Justice. In 2011, Judge Yusuf gained a seat in the advisory council of The Hague Institute for Global Justice. Dr Abdulqawi Ahmed Yusuf is Founder and General Editor of the African Yearbook of International Law and a member of the Institut de droit international (Geneva). He is also one of the founders of the African Foundation for International Law and Chairman of its Executive Committee.

In addition, Judge Yusuf has authored several books and numerous articles on various aspects of international law as well as articles and op-ed pieces in newspapers on current Northeast African and Somali affairs. He is a member of the editorial advisory board of the Asian Yearbook of International Law, and a member of the Thessaloniki Institute of Public International Law and International Relations curatorium. Dr Yusuf is fluent in Somali, English, French, Arabic, and Italian.

 

 

Annual Lecture with Baker & McKenzie LLP 2013:
Investment Treaty Arbitration: An International Lawyer's Perspective

6 June 2013Professor Brigitte Stern
University of Paris I - Panthéon-Sorbonne
About this lecture: This lecture assesses investment treaty arbitration through the eyes of a public international lawyer, and the lens of public international law. Contrary to a purely “commercial” approach to the resolution of disputes between foreign investors and States – which tend to proceed on the basis that both actors are to be treated as similar economic entities acting in the same playing field – this perspective offers the necessary and invaluable contribution of public international law. Such law takes into account the public nature of these disputes, and the specificities and functions of sovereign States, on questions such as interpretation, attribution and the consequences of the application of general principles of international law.

 

 

Annual Lecture with Middle Temple and Baker & McKenzie LLP 2012: 
Investment Arbitration: Cautionary Tales for Commercial Arbitrators

11 June 2012Professor Brigitte Stern
University of Paris I - Panthéon-Sorbonne
About this lecture: This lecture assesses investment treaty arbitration through the eyes of a public international lawyer, and the lens of public international law. Contrary to a purely “commercial” approach to the resolution of disputes between foreign investors and States – which tend to proceed on the basis that both actors are to be treated as similar economic entities acting in the same playing field – this perspective offers the necessary and invaluable contribution of public international law. Such law takes into account the public nature of these disputes, and the specificities and functions of sovereign States, on questions such as interpretation, attribution and the consequences of the application of general principles of international law.

 

 

Inaugural Annual Lecture with Baker & McKenzie LLP 2011:
The Function of Litigation in the International Community

13 June 2011Professor Vaughan Lowe QC
Chichele Professor of Public International Law and a Fellow of All Souls College, University of Oxford and Essex Court Chambers (London).
About this Lecture: The Function of Law in the International Community - to take the title of Hersch Lauterpacht's classic study - is to establish a framework for international dealings. But what is the function of litigation in the international community? Development of the law? The peaceful settlement of disputes? Or something different? And how does the function of the international litigation relate to the function of law?
Venue: The Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, London

 

 

Amsterdam Center for International Law:
The International Judicial Function

Friday, 18 March to Saturday, 19 March 2011

On 18 and 19 March 2011, the ACIL, in cooperation with the Project on International Courts and Tribunals (PICT), will organize a two-day seminar on the International Judicial Function. The seminar will discuss the goals of different international courts and the role of judges in fulfilling these goals. Separate panels will focus on the dispute settlement role of international courts, international courts as law-interpreters/developers, international courts as ‘law enforcers’, international courts as fact-finders and the international judicial function of national courts.

A key question will be the degree in which the judicial functions converge or vary across different international (and national) courts. Speakers include judges of the International Court of Justice, the European Court of Human Rights, the Court of Justice of the EU, the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, and the UK Supreme Court, and leading academics.

The seminar is a closed meeting.

Venue: University of Amsterdam

 

 

Impact of International Criminal Procedures on Domestic Criminal Procedures in Mass Atrocity Cases

Thursday 30 September and Friday 1 October 2010 

"THE DOMAC PROJECT"is hosting a Conference on the Impact of International Criminal Procedures on Domestic Criminal Procedures in Mass Atrocity Cases at the University of Amsterdam. The Conference is organized by DOMAC, in cooperation with the Project on International Courts and Tribunals (PICT) and the Amsterdam Center for International Law (ACIL). The Conference is free and open to academics and practitioners in various fields, including international law and international relations. 

For more information on DOMAC, please visit www.domac.is 

Venue: University of Amsterdam

 

 

DOMAC

16 May 2009

ICC Prosecutor, Luis Moreno Ocampo, will give the keynote address at a symposium organised by the DOMAC project to be held in Reykjavik on 16 May 2009.  The symposium is entitled Prosecuting Serious International Crimes: The joint role of national and international courts. The keynote address will be followed by two panel discussions featuring DOMAC researchers and Justice Shireen Fisher, Judge in the Appeals Chamber of the Special Court for Sierra Leone and former judge in the War Crimes Chamber of the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina. 

Details of the symposium are available here: 


 
The event is followed by a closed DOMAC workshop on Sunday 17 May.
 

Forensic Anthropology and Human Rights: Investigation, exhumation and analysis of evidence in the context of political/ethnic violence

Thursday 27 November 2008

Speaker: Silvana Turner, Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team
Venue: Keeton Room, UCL Laws
Time: 1pm, bring your own lunch

About the event: 

The Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team, (Equipo Argentino de Anthropologia Forense, EAAF), established in 1984, is a nongovernmental, nonprofit scientific organization that applies forensic sciences, mainly forensic anthropology, archaeology, and genetics, to the investigation of human rights violations in Argentina and around the world. The team was founded in response to the need to investigate the disappearances of at least 9,000 people by the military regime that ruled Argentina from 1976 to 1983. Applying forensic anthropology and related sciences, and working closely with victims and their relatives, the team seek to shed light on human rights violations, contributing to the search for truth, justice, reparation, and prevention of future abuses.

Silvana Turner has been a forensic anthropologist, investigator and researcher for EAAF since 1989. In addition to participating in investigations in Argentina, she has worked at the request of national and international NGOs, governmental and intergovernmental organisations, national and international commissions in Brazil, Uruguay, Bolivia, Colombia, Panama, El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala, Mexico, Ethiopia, South Africa, Zimbabwe and the Philippines.

 

Selecting International Judges: Principle, Process and Politics

Tuesday 9 September 2008, 9 – 5pm

The number of international courts is increasing and international courts are exerting ever greater influence on political, social, economic and environmental issues. These developments raise an important question: how are the international judges that sit on these courts selected?

For the past two years, the Centre for International Courts and Tribunals (CICT) at University College London has been conducting a project entitled Process and Legitimacy in the Nomination, Election and Appointment of International Judges funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (United Kingdom). The project has focussed on nominations and elections to the International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Court, with broader comparative reference to other international courts, and has asked:

(a) How do states nominate candidates for the ICJ and ICC?
(b) How do the election procedures for those courts operate in practice?
(c) What changes, if any, are needed to the nomination and election procedures?

The research team has interviewed over 100 individuals involved in the nomination and election of international judges. Interviewees have included diplomats, government legal advisors, members of the Permanent Court of Arbitration national groups, international and domestic judges, lawyers and academics.

This seminar, which has been jointly organised by the Centre for International Courts and Tribunals (CICT) and the Institute for International Law and Justice (IILJ), NYU Law School, will present the preliminary findings of the project for discussion and comment. Those taking part will include diplomats dealing with these issues, personnel of international organizations, academics, and judges. 

A limited number of additional places are available. If you would like attend this seminar, please contact Ms. Kate Barber on email kate.barber@ucl.ac.uk. If you are based at NYU, please contact iilj@juris.law.nyu.edu.

Venue: Greenberg Lounge at the New York University (NYU) School of Law

Related documents: 

 

International Courts and Tribunals in the 21st Century: the future of international justice

30 November - 1 December 2007

On 30 November and 1 December 2007, the Centre for International Courts and Tribunals (CICT) organised a conference at the Peace Palace in The Hague entitled International Courts and Tribunals in the 21st Century: the future of international justice. The event marked the tenth anniversary of the establishment of the Project on International Courts and Tribunals, and was organised  in cooperation with Loyola Law School Los Angeles, the Center on International Cooperation of New York University, the Grotius Centre of Leiden University and the Permanent Court of Arbitration.  
 
The conference addressed a number of key themes in the light of practice and research over the last ten years, including: the proper relationship between the various international and regional courts that now exist; factors that influence choices among international dispute settlement procedures; the relationship between international and national courts; the achievements, limitations and prospects of international criminal tribunals; and the function of ‘the international judge’. In a keynote session of the conference, the President of the International Court of Justice, Judge Rosalyn Higgins, responded to questions on various aspects of the conference themes. In the closing session, participants proposed priority issues for inclusion in a future research agenda on international courts and tribunals.
 
The participants included academics and practitioners, as well as representatives of twelve international courts and tribunals, including the International Court of Justice, the International Criminal Court, the World Trade Organization Appellate Body, the African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights and the Court of Justice of the Andean Community. Philippe Sands QC, Ruth Mackenzie and Kate Barber of CICT participated in the meeting, and 22 UCL LL.M students and one PhD student also attended. The conference saw the launch of three new titles in the Oxford University Press International Courts and Tribunals series.

 

Lecture Series 2007-08:
The Function of International Courts and Tribunals

9 October 2007Professor Campbell McLachlan QC
Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand; Bankside Chambers (Auckland) and Essex Court Chambers (London); Visiting Fellow, Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, University of Cambridge
The Relationship Between Investment Treaty Law And General International Law
(
Keeton Room, Bentham House)
3 December 2007Professor Cesare Romano 
Loyola Law School, Los Angeles
Professor Daniel Terris
Brandeis University
The International Judge
(Keeton Room, Bentham House)
5 February 2008Dr Chester Brown
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
A Common Law of International Adjudication
(Keeton Room, Bentham House)
4 March 2008Dr. Nikolaos Lavranos 
Center for International Law, University of Amsterdam
Regulating Competing Jurisdictions Among International Courts And Tribunals 
(Keeton Room, Faculty of Laws, UCL)

 

 

 

Lecture Series 2004-05:
The Function of International Courts and Tribunals

9 November 2004Mr Ibrahima Kane
Legal Officer for Africa, Interights
Protecting Human Rights in Africa: Can the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights Meet the Challenge?
(Keeton Room, Bentham House)
30 November 2004Professor Joel Paul
Hastings College of Law, University of California
American Justice: The War on Terror and the Rights of Prisoners
(Moot Court Room, Bentham House)
9 December 2004Professor Anne-Marie Slaughter
Dean, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University
Independence of the International Judiciary
(Keeton Room, Bentham House)
 

Lecture Series 2003-04:
The Function of International Courts and Tribunals

21 October 2003Professor Paul Schiff Berman 
University of Connecticut
The Rise, Fall, and Puzzling Persistence of Transnational Jurisdiction
Keeton Room, Bentham House
14 January 2004Alan Perry 
Kendall Freeman
The Loewen Award and the Function of Foreign Investment Arbitration
Keeton Room, Bentham House
28 January 2004Professor Elizabeth Wilmshurst
Visiting Professor, UCL/ former Deputy Legal Adviser, Foreign & Commonwealth Office
The International Criminal Court: Challenges and Prospects
Keeton Room, Bentham House
11 February 2004Professor Bart Brown 
Chicago-Kent School of Law/Lauterpacht Research Centre for International Law, Cambridge University
The Complementary Jurisdiction of the ICC and the Balance between State Responsibility and Individual Criminal Responsibility
Keeton Room, Bentham House
6 May 2004Professor Francisco Orrego Vicuna 
University of Santiago, Chile
What future ICSID?
Keeton Room, Bentham House
26 May 2004Professor David Kennedy
Harvard Law School
The Dark Side of International Adjudication
Keeton Room, Bentham House

 

 

Past Lecture Series: 
The Function of International Courts and Tribunals

9 October 2002Professor Georges Abi-Saab
Member, Appellate Body, WTO; former Judge, ICTY
The Function of the International Judge
Followed by reception to launch Centre on International Courts and Tribunals
30 October 2002Allan Rosas, Judge
European Court of Justice
The European Court of Justice - Neither International nor Domestic
4 December 2002Michael Wood
Legal Adviser, Foreign and Commonwealth Office
The United Kingdom and the Settlement of Disputes by International Courts and Tribunals
5 February 2003Chidi Odinkalu
Interights
30 April 2003Patricia Sellars
Prosecutor, International Criminal Tribunal for former Yugoslavia
Midlife Prosecutorial Challenges at the ICTY
4 June 2003Professor Laurence Boisson de Chazournes
University of Geneva
The Development of International Environmental Law and Judicial Legislation: Where is the Boundary?