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EME ONLINE: Workshop on GEMMS (Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons)

31 May 2022, 5:00 pm–7:00 pm

John Owen portrait

This workshop will introduce GEMMS (Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons), which is a group-sourced online bibliographic database of early modern (1530-1715) manuscript sermons from the UK, Ireland and North America.

This event is free.

Event Information

Open to

All

Availability

Yes

Cost

Free

Organiser

Prof Alison Shell

This workshop was originally scheduled in March 2022, but had to be postponed due to industrial action. It is now taking place on 31st May 2022.

This workshop will introduce GEMMS (Gateway to Early Modern Manuscript Sermons), which is a group-sourced online bibliographic database of early modern (1530-1715) manuscript sermons from the UK, Ireland and North America.

GEMMS is freely accessible (https://gemmsorig.usask.ca/) and fully searchable and currently contains records of over 20,000 sermons and sermon notes from more than 70 libraries and archives.

We will explore the range of materials included in GEMMS and the various ways users can search the database. As scholars have increasingly recognized the importance of sermons in early modern society and culture, we also will consider how manuscript sermons could be useful for a variety of research projects, including not only religious topics, but also work on book history and ownership, manuscript transmission, cultural exchanges, genre studies, women's history, the lives of children, social networks, political history, and even the history of science.

This event will take place online, via Zoom. Please register to receive the joining link: https://eme-gemms.eventbrite.co.uk

To be presented by Catherine Evans and chaired by Alison Shell. Hosted by the UCL Centre for Early Modern Exchanges

About the Speaker

Dr Catherine Evans

Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow at John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester

Catherine's doctoral thesis, completed at the University of Sheffield in 2019, examined early modern religious literature and the materiality of time in psalm translations, devotional verse, and sermons. She was a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities, University of Edinburgh, from December 2019 - August 2020, where she worked on 17th century women’s meditations. She is currently a Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow at the John Rylands Research Institute, University of Manchester, researching glass and pearls in devotional cultures. She has been a researcher for GEMMS since 2018.

More about Dr Catherine Evans