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Gee Research Blog

Dating Mammalian Evolution

Fri, 28 Mar 2014 15:14:37 +0000

When the age of the dinosaurs ended around 65 million years ago, mammals stepped in to fill the gap, and the age of the placentals began. However, whether early placental mammals were already present on Earth before the demise of the dinosaurs has been the subject of a long standing debate. Recent research in GEE [...]

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The Delicate Balance of Effect and Response

Tue, 18 Feb 2014 11:50:36 +0000

We may not always be aware of it, but many wild plants, animals, fungi and even bacteria, provide crucial services to us which keep the ecosystems of Earth functioning. Environmental changes caused by human activities are now threatening many species, and those that cannot withstand these changes may be lost forever, potentially taking the services [...]

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It’s All in the Wrist

Fri, 20 Dec 2013 16:18:20 +0000

The evolution of the primate wrist has been dramatic, enabling primates to adapt to a wide variety of lifestyles and walking styles, including tree-swinging, climbing and terrestrial walking both on four legs and two. In hominids, the evolution of the bipedal gait freed up the forelimbs for tool use, and the wrist evolved independently from [...]

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The Transcriptional Profile of A ‘Wingman’

Wed, 27 Nov 2013 14:25:48 +0000

In many species, males have special adaptations to attract females. From antlers to stalk-eyes, to bright plumage and beards, males across the animal kingdom work hard to look attractive to the opposite sex. In some species, looking good isn’t enough, though. Male wild turkeys need a less attractive ‘wingman’ to help him attract a woman. [...]

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Damage and Fidelity: The Role of the Female Germline in mtDNA Inheritance

Mon, 11 Nov 2013 15:13:12 +0000

Billions of years ago, one single-celled organism engulfed another, beginning a symbiotic interaction that would change live on Earth forever. The mitochondria are what remains of this symbiotic event, and are responsible for producing energy in all eukaryotic cells. Derived from a free-living organism, they carry their own genes, but these genes are at risk [...]

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Academic Retreat

Joint GEE/IOZ Research Away Day

Mappin Pavillion, Institute of Zoology, London Zoo Regents Park

Thursday 18 April 2013   

09:00-10:00 Coffee
10:00-10.30

Jon Bielby (IoZ)

Behavioural, ecological and epidemiological impacts of badger mortality

10:30-11:00

Nazif Alic (IHA)

Transcriptional control and ageing in Drosophila: beyond dFOXO

11:00-11:30

Paola Oliveri (GEE/CDB)

Regulatory control and evolution of skeleton in echinoderms

11.30-12.00

Richard Pearson (CBER)

Modeling species’ ecological niches and geographic distributions

12.00-12.30

John Allen (Visiting Professor GEE)

Energy, fidelity, ageing, sex. Oocyte mitochondria are quiescent genetic templates

12:30-14:00

Lunch

14:00-14:30

Paul Jepson (IoZ)

Investigating impacts of chemical and noise pollution in dolphins and porpoises

14:30-15:00

Oliver Davis (UGI)

Mapping the UK's genetic and environmental hotspots

15:00-15:30

Garrett Hallenthal (UGI)

Inferring ancestry and historical mixing events using haplotypes

15:30-16:00

Tea

16:00-16:30

Nichola Raihani (GEE)

Human punishment is motivated by inequity aversion not a desire for reciprocity

16:30-17:00

Trent Garner (IoZ)

Determining when infectious diseases are conservation threats to amphibians

17:00-18:00 Drinks

Page last modified on 27 sep 13 17:13