2007

FIRST BLOOMSBURY CONFERENCE ON E-PUBLISHING AND E-PUBLICATIONS, 28 & 29 JUNE 2007
CENTRE FOR PUBLISHING, UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON
MODELS IN FLUX: BOOKS AND JOURNALS

The Centre for Publishing at University College London has already built up a reputation for ground-breaking research in scholarly communication and this initial conference is devoted to scholarly publishing, placed in context as one aspect of the larger picture. All of us involved in the information chain and especially scholars instinctively think of books and journals as the main way that knowledge is mediated by us and to us. We are therefore concentrating on communication using these means. They are constructs that have served us well for centuries and continue to do so. This conference, planned to be the first of an annual series, questions the sustainability of the old models of content delivery as well as the old business models themselves.

The changing environment is an international phenomenon, but we will be focusing on UK speakers and UK developments, as examples or exemplars of the wider picture.

This conference will commence with a keynote presentation by someone who is, by virtue of his position as well as his experience and abilities, particularly well qualified to pronounce with insight on what is, and what may be, in this field. The morning sessions (and part of the first afternoon session) will be devoted to expert presentations establishing some of the drivers of change which look likely to transform the landscape of scholarly publishing over the current decade. There will be question and answer sessions at the end of each presentation.

The afternoons will be devoted to panel sessions, covering on the first day books (specifically e-books), and on the second day journals, now already primarily delivered electronically. At the end of the second day there will be an overview of the topic and a commentary on what has been presented by a leading publisher also known as an independent thinker. All the speakers will be urged to think in terms of business models, how they will change and on the achievement of sustainability in such a way that scholarly communication will be optimally facilitated.

Venue: Darwin Lecture Theatre, UCL

Email: infostudies-conferences@ucl.ac.uk

PROGRAMME:

DAY ONE THURSDAY 28 June 2007

Registration and Coffee in the Garden Room from 9.30
The first day of the Conference will begin at 10.15 in the Darwin Lecture Theatre, Darwin building


10.15 Introductory Comments by the chair of the conference
Anthony Watkinson, University College London

10.30 An Overview of the e-content scene
Graham Taylor, Publishers Association

DRIVERS OF CHANGE 1

The organisers have picked out six drivers of change. There could have been more. Some of these drivers result from changes in the way that scholars work but most of them are from outside the Academy and not necessarily welcomed within the Academy. The emphasis is as much on the realm of ideas as on the actualities of policy making and the speakers are asked to concentrate on the likely impact on the way scholars work arising from the processes described.

11.00 The first driver of change – What the virtual user seems to want
Professor David Nicholas, Centre for Publishing at University College London
Professor Nicholas and his team have been researching for five years on how academics use the web in pursuit of their scholarly goals and it is central to his thinking that we cannot separate scholarly activity from the wider behavioural changes brought about by all interactions with the Internet.

11.45 The second driver of change – Changing economics - lessons from another sector
Richard Withey, Independent News and Media PLC
Mr. Withey analyses the profound changes in recent years in the way that the newspaper industry is financed and is developing, and speculates on how these changes, already obvious, may point to developments in our own sector and how we survive in the new environment.

12.30 The third driver of change – He who pays the piper
Robert Kiley, Wellcome Trust
The scholarly enterprise has to be paid for and one of the big changes of the last few years has been the decision by funding agencies to concern themselves with the dissemination of scholarship and not just what research is done. The Wellcome Trust has been a bell wether in this process and has strongly influenced government thinking in the UK.

Lunch in the Garden Room from 13.15

The afternoon session will be chaired by Professor Iain Stevenson, Professor of Publishing at University College London

PANEL ON BOOKS
Moderator:Christoph Chesher, Taylor & Francis/Informa
A range of authoritative speakers from different parts of the information chain will lead discussion on the role of eBooks in scholarship.

14.20 Introduction
Christoph Chesher, Taylor & Francis/Informa
Mr. Chesher, a leader in making talk about an e-Book explosion into a reality, will outline where we are in the digital revolution as applied to scholarly books.

14.40 Publisher business models
Linda Bennett, e-book consultant
Ms Bennett has an unrivalled knowledge of publisher thinking as they try to find business models that make sense of the new and rapidly changing world of eBooks. She will provide insights into what models seem to be making sense

15.15 A librarian’s perspective on eBooks
Terry Bucknell, University of Liverpool libraries
Librarians have a key role as intermediaries between the publisher of the eBook and the end-user, whether academic or (increasingly) students. They are stakeholders who are concerned with inadequacies in publishing provision and in particular access and pricing models they are confronted with. Mr. Bucknell will provide guidance to what might suit him and his colleagues

Refreshments in the Garden Room from 15.50

16.20 The eBrary vision: A case study
Christopher Warnock, CEO eBrary
EBrary has pioneered innovative models for the provision of e-content. Mr. Warnock will outline his original aims and ambitions in setting up eBrary, how has he has adapted and his vision for the future

16.55 Amazon, Google & Windows Live
Michael Holdsworth, consultant, formerly Cambridge University Press
Mr. Holdsworth is well known for his insights into these companies whose impact on e-publishing cannot be underestimated. He will explain the current programmes and models and the impact some of their planned changes may have on pricing and traditional bookselling.

17.30 Discussion of future developments
which will include the moderator and will be chaired by the conference chair.

The first day of the Conference will conclude with drinks at 18.00 in the Garden Room

DAY TWO FRIDAY 29th JUNE 2007

Registration and Coffee from the Garden Room from 08.45
The second day of the Conference will begin at 9.30 in the Darwin Lecture Theatre
Chair for the day – Anthony Watkinson


DRIVERS OF CHANGE 2

09.30 The fourth driver of change – Everything should be open
Dr. David Prosser, SPARC Europe

The Open Access movement is an important driver of change and Dr. Prosser is one of Europe’s main advocates for the movement. The origins of the movement include the concept, central to the thinking of Internet pioneers, that information should be free and it is these and other philosophical underpinnings which will be central to his presentation.

10.15 The fifth driver of change – The disruptive power of technological advance
Geoffrey Bilder, CrossRef
Mr Bilder is an expert on the technology of the Internet particularly in the area of searching, central to scholarship, and he will demonstrate the threats and opportunities as presented by the Web.

Refreshments in the Garden room from 11.00

11.30 The sixth driver of change – Changes in scholarly communication
Dr. Michael Jubb, Research Information Network
Under the leadership of Dr. Jubb the RIN is building up a picture of how scholars work in the digital environment, and what they need in order to optimise their research efforts through successful discovery.

Lunch in the Garden room from 12.15

PANEL ON JOURNALS
Moderator:Martin Richardson, Oxford University Press
Journals are mainly online and the e-version is the definitive one, but, nevertheless there are many who would claim that the present economic model is unsustainable and radical changes are needed. What does the future look like?

13.20 Overview – where are mainstream journal publishers with new models?
Martin Richardson, OUP
Oxford University Press has an impressive record in trying out new models. Martin Richardson will draw on their experience to provide a wide-ranging analysis of where “traditional” publishers are now in testing models for sustainability and where they might go

14.00 Making journals more accessible
Leo Walford, Sage Publishing
A leading journals marketer will describe how publishers have sought to meet the needs of the academic user by making available journals in big subscription models and on a pay-per-view basis using creative licensing and payment models and speculate on what the future may hold

14.30 New, emerging, and potential models
Dr. Matthew Cockerill, BioMed Central
BioMed Central is the largest Open Access publisher and has developed a range of models. The term “OA journals” conceals a range of different possible ways of funding the basic concept. Not all of them involve publishers. Some involve libraries. Dr Cockerill will explain and comment.

Refreshments in the Garden Room from 15.00

15.30 What models suit librarians?
Sue McKnight, Nottingham Trent University
There is no monolithic library view of publishing models. The so-called Big Deal began as a win-win accommodation between a library consortium and a publisher but now all parties look to adjustment. Above all there is the problem of cost: how would librarians like publishers to help them face the problems of every increasing research and ever increasing papers in the literature

16.00 Panel discussion
will be chaired by the conference chair and will include the moderator.

16.40 Overview, Commentary, and Insights
Richard Charkin, Macmillan
Mr. Charkin is known as one of the most innovative publishers of his generation and is uniquely qualified to look ahead to the future of our sector. He is actively engaged in both scholarly journal and scholarly book publishing across many academic disciplines.

The second day of the conference will end at 17.10.
PANEL ON JOURNALS
Moderator:Martin Richardson, Oxford University Press
Journals are mainly online and the e-version is the definitive one, but, nevertheless there are many who would claim that the present economic model is unsustainable and radical changes are needed. What does the future look like?

13.20 Overview – where are mainstream journal publishers with new models?
Martin Richardson, OUP
Oxford University Press has an impressive record in trying out new models. Martin Richardson will draw on their experience to provide a wide-ranging analysis of where “traditional” publishers are now in testing models for sustainability and where they might go

14.00 Making journals more accessible
Leo Walford, Sage Publishing
A leading journals marketer will describe how publishers have sought to meet the needs of the academic user by making available journals in big subscription models and on a pay-per-view basis using creative licensing and payment models and speculate on what the future may hold

14.30 New, emerging, and potential models
Dr. Matthew Cockerill, BioMed Central
BioMed Central is the largest Open Access publisher and has developed a range of models. The term “OA journals” conceals a range of different possible ways of funding the basic concept. Not all of them involve publishers. Some involve libraries. Dr Cockerill will explain and comment.

Refreshments in the Garden Room from 15.00

15.30 What models suit librarians?
Sue McKnight, Nottingham Trent University
There is no monolithic library view of publishing models. The so-called Big Deal began as a win-win accommodation between a library consortium and a publisher but now all parties look to adjustment. Above all there is the problem of cost: how would librarians like publishers to help them face the problems of every increasing research and ever increasing papers in the literature

16.00 Panel discussion
will be chaired by the conference chair and will include the moderator.

16.40 Overview, Commentary, and Insights
Richard Charkin, Macmillan
Mr. Charkin is known as one of the most innovative publishers of his generation and is uniquely qualified to look ahead to the future of our sector. He is actively engaged in both scholarly journal and scholarly book publishing across many academic disciplines.

The second day of the conference will end at 17.10.

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