Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Please sign up for news and future events
For Email Marketing you can trust


Professor John O’Keefe

Publication date:

Professor John O’Keefe, inaugural Director of the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour at UCL, having launched the centre, will be stepping down from the role in September 2016 so he can once again devote his full attention to a significant program of ongoing and new scientific research. We are extremely grateful to him for having taken on the demanding role of launching the Centre and are delighted that he will continue his research within it.

Vice Provost (Health) View November 2015

Publication date:


Having been Vice-Provost (Health) for three months, I should like to start by thanking my predecessor Professor Sir John Tooke: health at UCL has gone from strength to strength over the past five and a half years.

PhotoSynthesis Competition results

Publication date:

After months of waiting the results are finally in for our Photosynthesis competition 2015. The judging panel (consisting of senior academics, managers and communications staff from across the School) were extremely impressed by all the entries but the winners are:

Genes involved in schizophrenia and obesity highlighted

Publication date:


Genes involved in schizophrenia and obesity have been highlighted in a new UCL study, which could lead to a better understanding of the DNA variants which affect risk of these conditions and aid the development of improved strategies for prevention and treatment.

Extra brain cells make males remember sex

Publication date:

His and hers

A pair of neurons have been found in the brain of male nematode worms that allow them to remember and seek sex even at the expense of food. 

How the Inuit adapted to Ice Age living and a high-fat diet

Publication date:


Greenland natives – the Inuit – have mutations in genes that control how the body uses fat which provides the clearest evidence to date that human populations are adapted to particular diets according to new UCL research. The genetic differences allow the Inuit to physically adapt to survive Arctic conditions and live healthily on a traditional diet which is rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from marine mammal fat.

Major new research study on the impact of system-wide reorganisation of cancer services

Publication date:

A research team led by Professor Naomi Fulop (UCL Department of Applied Health Research) has been awarded £1.2 million over three and a half years by the National Institute for Health Research Health Services and Delivery Research Programme to study the centralisation of specialist cancer surgical services.

Old world monkey had tiny, complex brain

Publication date:

Monkey brain

The brain of a 15 million year old monkey has been visualized for the first time by a team led by Professor Fred Spoor (UCL Cell & Developmental Biology). The 3D computer model shows that the brain is much smaller and has more folds than expected, supporting the idea that brain complexity can evolve before brain size in the primate family tree.

Cancer drug makes fruit flies live longer

Publication date:


Adult fruit flies given a cancer drug live 12% longer than average, according to a UCL-led study researching healthy ageing. The drug targets a specific cellular process that occurs in animals, including humans, delaying the onset of age-related deaths by slowing the ageing process.

Single gene controls fish brain size and intelligence

Publication date:


A single gene called Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) drives brain size and intelligence in fish according to a new study by researchers at UCL, Stockholm University and University of Helsinki.

Climate change threatens to undermine the last half century of health gains

Publication date:

Climate emergency

The threat to human health from climate change is so great that it could undermine the last fifty years of gains in development and global health, according to a major new UCL-led Commission, published in The Lancet.

Queen’s Birthday Honours for the UCL community

Publication date:

Helen Cross

Congratulations to the members of the UCL community who have been recognised in the 2015 Queen’s Birthday Honours list.

Dr D. Flemming Hansen wins Marlow Award

Publication date:

Congratulations to Dr D. Flemming Hansen on being awarded the 2015 Marlow Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry. The Marlow Award is in recognition of the most meritorious contributions to physical chemistry or chemical physics. Dr Hansen received the award for the development and application of NMR spectroscopy in understanding motions in biological molecules at atomic resolution. 

SLMS Education Domain announces the winners of the first SLMS Education Awards

Publication date:

education awards

We are proud to announce the winners of the first SLMS Education Awards to reward those dedicated to improving the quality of education for SLMS students and to spotlight and support excellence and innovation in the delivery of education.

Academy of Medical Sciences Fellows 2015

Publication date:

Academy of Medical Sciences

Five researchers from across UCL SLMS have been recognised for their contribution to the advancement of medical science by election to the Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences. Professors Peter Brocklehurst, Frances Brodsky, Diana Kuh, Catherine Law and Alan Thompson joined the existing Fellows of the Academy to bring the total membership to 1134.

Connecting places causes mental maps to merge

Publication date:


Realising how places connect geographically causes local maps in the brain to join, forming one big map which helps with planning future journeys, finds a new UCL study.

Men donate competitively on women’s fundraising webpages

Publication date:


Men give more money through fundraising websites after seeing that other men have donated large amounts and when the fundraiser is an attractive woman, according to new UCL and University of Bristol research.

Complex genetic ancestry of Americans uncovered

Publication date:

Approximate geographic sampling location of donor (circles) and recipient (diamonds) populations analyzed.

By comparing the genes of current-day North and South Americans with African and European populations, a new study has found the genetic fingerprints of the slave trade and colonisation that shaped migrations to the Americas hundreds of years ago.

‘Most attractive’ male birds don’t have the best genes

Publication date:


‘Attractive’ male birds that mate with many females aren’t passing on the best genes to their offspring, according to new UCL research which found promiscuity in male birds leads to small, genetic faults in the species’ genome. Although minor, these genetic flaws may limit how well future generations can adapt to changing environments. 

The first fine-scale genetic map of the British Isles

Publication date:

The regions of ancient British, Irish and Saxon control in the 7th Century

Many people in the UK feel a strong sense of regional identity, and it now appears that there may be a scientific basis to this feeling, according to a landmark new study into the genetic makeup of the British Isles.

Three of world’s premier pharmacy schools form landmark alliance

Publication date:

UCL, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Monash University are joining forces to advance and transform research, education and practice in pharmacy and the pharmaceutical sciences.

Computer reconstruction of human fossil sheds light on our origins

Publication date:

Handy man 1

The fossil of Homo habilis, or ‘handy man’, has undergone state-of-the-art computer reconstruction, revealing new information about its jaw shape which indicates the species has older evolutionary roots than previously thought and shows that three different Homo species existed between 2.1 and 1.6 million years ago, according to UCL researchers who led the study.

Brain’s GPS system influenced by shape of environment

Publication date:


Patterns created by the brain’s grid cells, which are believed to guide navigation, are modified by the shape of the environment, according to UCL researchers. This means grid patterns aren’t a universal metric for the brain’s GPS system to measure distance, as previously thought.

UCL and QMUL agree to establish a new institute to tackle cardiovascular disease

Publication date:


UCL and Queen Mary University of London have agreed to establish a joint  Cardiovascular Institute to rise to the global challenge of cardiovascular disease.

Human activity puts Earth’s systems at risk

Publication date:


Four of the nine systems that regulate the interaction between land, ocean, atmosphere, ice-sheets and life on Earth are at risk from destabilisation due to human activity, according to an international team including UCL scientists.

Search UCL News