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Holocaust Memorial Day 2023: Survival, Trauma, Silence

26 January 2023, 5:00 pm–7:00 pm

Safer in Silence film poster

A screening of the documentary 'Safer in Silence' by author Corinne Niox Chateau, followed a panel discussion with Corinne Chateau, Holocaust survivor Agnes Kaposi, Antony Polonsky (Emeritus, Brandeis) and François Guesnet (Chair, UCL Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies) on 'Survival, Trauma, Silence'

Event Information

Open to

All

Availability

Yes

Organiser

Professor François Guesnet

Location

Engineering Building Room 1.02
Malet Place
London
WC1E 7JE

A screening of the documentary 'Safer in Silence' by author Corinne Chateau, followed by Corinne, the daughter of a World War II refugee, searches for the truth of her family’s Polish past. Uncovering Jewish roots, she is pulled into a complex journey revealing startling revelations that force her to face the patterns of hiding and secrecy that have profoundly affected her life.

There will be a panel discussion with Corinne Chateau, Holocaust survivor Agnes Kaposi, Antony Polonsky (Emeritus, Brandeis) and François Guesnet (UCL) on 'Survival, Trauma, Silence'

This is an event for Holocaust Memorial Day, presented in conjunction with the UCL Institute of Jewish Studies, UCL Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies and the Martin Gilbert Learning Center.

About the Speakers

Corinne Niox Chateau

Corinne Niox Chateau is an author, director, and actor with appearances in film, TV and theatre productions based in New York. She is the written, directed and produced ‘Safer in Silence’ (2020), the history of her own family, originating from Warsaw. The documentary has been screened at film festivals and received several awards, including the Best Story Award at the East Europe International Film Festival and the Judaica Foundation Award 2021.

François Guesnet

François Guesnet, Professor of Modern Jewish History, UCL Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies, is an expert on early modern and 19th century Polish-Jewish history, co-chair of the Editorial Board of Polin Studies in Polish Jewry, and most recently editor of ‘Sources on Jewish Self-Government in the Polish Lands from its Inception to the Present’ (2022).

Agnes Kaposi

Agnes Kaposi, born in 1932 to a Hungarian-Jewish and socialist family, survived Debrecen ghetto and forced labour camps in Austria during World War Two. A graduate of the Technical University of Budapest, she left Hungary for England after the 1956 uprising and became an industrial researcher in the Telecommunication and Computer industries. She obtained a PhD in Computer Aided design in 1971, and for many years was the head of Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering South Bank Polytechnic, later to become South Bank University. Over the past years, she has dedicated her time to drafting a memoir of her childhood, of the time of persecution and forced labour, of student years under Stalinist tyranny, and of her professional career in Britain. These recollections were published as ‘Yellow Star, Red Star’ (i2i, Manchester 2020). She advocates for social justice, anti-prejudice, and equality.

Antony Polonsky

Antony Polonsky, Chief Historian of the Global Educational Outreach Programme/Polin Museum Warsaw, and Professor Emeritus, Brandeis University, is co-chair of the Editorial Board of Polin Studies in Polish Jewry and the author of numerous studies on eastern European Jewish history, including ‘The Jews in Poland and Russia’, 3 vols (2010, 2012), and ‘The Jews in Poland and Russia. A Short History’ (2013).