XClose

UCL CULTURE

Home
Menu

Projects landing page

Showing All Projects:
A horse weathervane in a blue wash of colour
2019 Beacon Bursaries awarded
UCL Culture is delighted to announce the awardees in the latest round of Beacon Bursary public engagement funding.The aim of this scheme is to advance the practice and culture of public and community engagement within UCL by enabling UCL staff and postgraduate students to:Explore mutually beneficial engagement between communities and UCL research and teaching.Be innovative in their engagement.Evaluate, learn from and share their engagement activities.The Beacon Bursary funding scheme supports UCL’s Public Engagement Strategy which aims to embed public engagement as a normal, valued activity for UCL staff and studentsWe have funded eight projects in this round, three of which involve communities and local organisations in east London.The projects are:Julia Bailey – Primary Care and Population HealthContraception Choices.Contraception choices will offer a series of outreach workshops and an International Women's Day public engagement event to engage a range of audiences in discussions about contraception. This project will reach communities such as the queer, trans and non-binary communities, homeless people and migrant women, working with groups including Open Doors in Hackney and Queer Newham. It will facilitate discussions to find more about the contraception needs of these 'hard-to-reach' communities, and to set agendas for future research.Dr Julia Bailey is an associate professor in Primary Care at the UCL eHealth Unit, and a specialty doctor in community sexual health in South East LondonEllie Buckley and Ali Northcott – Centre for Research in Education and Autism (CRAE)Embodying Difference – A multi-platform event exploring neurodiversity and creativity.Embodying Difference will be a one-off event creating a public dialogue between artistic and scientific disciplines and modes of research. The event will explore new ways to generate knowledge from different perspectives - highlighting the strengths of the neurodivergent art practitioners, showcasing their insights, and highlighting how their neurodiversity and co-existing conditions such as autism, dyspraxia, ADHD, dyslexia and synaesthesia enhance and inform their creativity and artistic practice.Ellie Buckley is a current PhD student in the Centre for Research in Autism and Education. Ali Northcott is the Artist-in-Residence and Honorary Researcher for the Centre for Research in Autism and EducationRachel Frost –  Primary Care and Population HealthUpping our game: achieving meaningful patient and public collaboration in primary care research and teaching across the whole department.Upping our game will further develop PCPH’s existing project-level patient and public involvement to transform and embed long term public and patient involvement through all aspects of Departmental strategy (research, teaching, impact and patient involvement).Dr Rachael Frost is a Research Associate in the Department of Primary Care and Population Health.Valentina Giordano – Bartlett School of PlanningPlace Alliance: Child-centred urban planning.This will involve children in a design workshop to explore the question: What would child-centred urban planning look like? Students from Bobby Moore Academy, near UCL East, will be involved through an assembly, co-design workshops and the chance to share their work through public exhibitions.Valentina Giordano is a Research Fellow at the Bartlett School of Planning where she manages the Place Alliance.Ezra Horbury – English Language and LiteratureWriting Trans LivesWriting Trans Lives builds on the ‘Trans Studies, Trans lives symposium’ to bring together aspiring trans/non-binary writers with established trans/non-binary writers through three workshops, a public reading and potential publication. The established writers will provide practical advice and develop aspiring writers’ expertise and experience at writing their own narratives.Dr Ezra Horbury is a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of English Language and Literature.Jaqueline McDermott – UCL Cancer InstituteVisible Vulvas – Artistic Explorations of Living with Vulval Disease.Visible Vulvas will involve the delivery of three workshops around vulval health awareness leading to an art exhibition co-produced by scientists, women living with vulval disease, and artists and, hopefully, taking place in the Vagina Museum in Camden. The project will increase awareness and understanding of vulval disease amongst the general public and the medical profession.Dr Jackie McDermott is an Academic Gynaecological Pathology Consultant at University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation TrustNaaheed Mukadam – Faculty of Brain SciencesRe-framing the dementia narrative in east London.Re-framing will co-develop and run four art based workshops to raise awareness of dementia risk factors and the benefits of dementia diagnosis in the South Asian community in east London. Working with community groups such as the Sonali Gardens Day Centre and Kobi Nazrul Community Centre, it will gather the communities’ input regarding research priorities from this group.Dr Naaheed Mukadam is a Senior Clinical Research Fellow Consultant in the Division of PsychiatryMelanie Ramdarshan Bold – Department of Information StudiesThe Green Room play and workshop, Theatre PeckhamThis project will provide opportunities and a platform for authors of colour; Drawing on UCL research, the project will increase the awareness of theatre audiences of the experiences of authors of colour in the British publishing industry. To achieve this the project will co-create a reciprocal dialogue and partnership between academia and community stakeholders (Words of Colour and Theatre Peckham) and create a longer and larger-scale project.Dr Melanie Ramdarshan Bold is a Senior Lecturer/Associate Professor in the Department of Information Studies. 
A horse weathervane in a blue wash of colour
2019 Train and Engage projects funded
UCL Culture is delighted to announce the awardees in the latest round of Train and Engage funding.Train and Engage is a training and funding program for postgraduate research students, who are looking to connect their work with public groups.The unit is proud to have funded 5 projects in the latest round of funding and brief summaries are below.Chuckie Fer Calsado – Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment - Institute of Education.Curriculum Enrichment: STEM and Indiginous Knowledge for Lumad Bakwit School.The project aims to gather and mobilise volunteer STEM educators in enriching the current STEM curriculum of the Lumad Bakwit Schools and in crafting essential learning materials for them. The Lumad People are an etholinguistic group in Mindanao, Philippines: they have been forcibly displaced from their ancestral lands where their culture is deeply rooted, and where their community schools are situated. Seeking refuge in evacuation areas through the help of support groups, Lumad ‘Bakwit’ (from the word ‘evacuation’) Schools were built to continue their education. These makeshift classrooms in evacuation centers serve as their school. This project aims to provide a venue for open discussions with the volunteer educators on the realities of the people from the countryside, such as that of the Lumad People’s struggle for the right to education and self determinationTabitha Millett – Culture, Communication and Media - Institute of Education.Queering the Art Classroom Collaborates.This project is an exhibition of five London-based early career artists, which will take place in September 15-26th at the National Trust’s Sutton House. The artists involved will be making work in response to a June exhibition, which is comprised of student work from three GCSE classes in London who have made work with Queering the Art Classroom (QTAC), exploring gender and sexuality. The aim of Queering the Art Classroom Collaborates is to provide a platform for emerging LGBTQ+ artists. The project will also run workshops for schools and the public throughout the duration of the exhibition. This particular project is driven by a desire to connect local school students with artists and give them the opportunity to work with industry professionals.Diana Margot Rosenthal – Population, Policy and Practice - UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health.Walk In My Shoes.This project sets out to facilitate a series of creative and collaborative skill-based workshops with homeless mothers of children under-5 and to produce an exhibition promoting public awareness of child homelessness and the challenges encountered in meeting the Healthy Child programme recommendations when living in temporary accommodation. We will work together with mothers to translate the research data gathered through citizen science approaches into a map quilt, creating a visual representation of the barriers they personally face when trying to engage with health care services and supporting their children to meet developmental milestones. These workshops will be hosted at The Magpie Project, Newham, where their children will be in a supportive and safe space as their mothers develop transferable skills to sustain in the long term, as many are currently unable to work due to their immigration status. These efforts will culminate in a week-long art exhibition and programme of talks, as well as further visualisations of the project data produced by local artists in a public space.Choong Ling Liew-Cain – Space & Climate Physics - Mathematics & Physical Sciences.Stargazing at Mullard Space Science Laboratory.The aims of this project are to increase the visibility of Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL, Department of Space & Climate Science) within the local community where they can learn about the research taking place in the department and its value, to create an opportunity for researchers and local residents to interact and create a legacy of public engagement activities for local residents in MSSL.Eva A Sprecher – Psychoanalysis Unit – Psychology and Language Sciences.Dialogue Development Workshops: what should we be researching regarding foster carer-foster child relationships?This project aims to act as a response to the systematic exclusion of young people with care experience and foster carers in research concerning parenting relationships. Often being a foster carer or looked-after-child are exclusion criteria for parenting-focused studies; leading to neglect in research of large numbers of children in the UK who grow up in long-term foster care. The project will work with project partners to co-design dialogue workshops that include creative and engaging activities to generate ideas and conversations with participants about research regarding the relationship between foster carers and looked after children/young people.  
3D Petrie
The 3DPetrie project looked at the viability of using high quality 3D images of museum collections to engage a range of audiences.  This took place through the production of 3D models of Petrie Museum artefacts and the development of end-user digital 3D applications.Since 2009, The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology at UCL, in collaboration with UCL's Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering and business partner Arius 3D, has been developing this groundbreaking programme for creating 3D images of objects in the Petrie collection.The aims of the projects:To develop a viable workflow for the production of high quality 3D models of museum objects, in particular using colour laser scanning.To develop a range of digital 3D applications that will engage audiences.To undertake audience evaluations of the 3D models and applications to better understand the potential of 3D in cultural heritage.This selection of our most recent publications over the past 2 years show our expertise and research in 3D imaging for museums and cultural heritage. e-brochure: Hess, M. , Nelson, T. , Robson, S. (2013). The Science of 3D [Digital scholarly resource].Payne, E.M., 2013. Imaging Techniques in Conservation. Journal of Conservation and Museum Studies, 10(2).  Nelson, T. and MacDonald, S.: “A Space for Innovation and Experimentation: University Museums as Test Beds for New Digital Technologies” in Academic Museums: Beyond Exhibitions and Education; “Viral Capacity Building for Innovation” in British Council Creative and Cultural Economy; (Autumn 2012) Publisher LinkGiacometti, A., Campagnolo, A., MacDonald, L., Mahony, S., Terras, M., Robson, S.,  Gibson, A. (2012). Cultural heritage destruction: Documenting parchment degradation via multispectral imaging. Proc. of Electronic Visualisation and the Arts (EVA 2012), 301-308.Macdonald, S., Hess, M., Robson, S., & Were, G. (2012). 3D Recording and Museums. In C. Warwick, Terras, Nyhan (Eds.), Digital Humanities in Practice (pp. 91-115). London, UK: Facet.Hess, M., & Robson, S. (2010). 3D colour imaging for cultural heritage artefacts. International Archives of Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences, XXXVIII (Part 5), 288-292.Find out more here http://www.ucl.ac.uk/3dpetriemuseum
Disrupters and Innovators
About Disrupters and Innovators
Discover more about Disrupters and Innovators, UCL's exhibition dedicated to remarkable women, whose lives and careers were shaped by what they learnt, taught and researched at UCL.The exhibition curated by Dr Nina Pearlman is presented in two parts: a prologue called The Magic Fruit Garden, and Disrupters and Innovators, which features a number of women with connections to the university.The stories in this exhibition reflect the long struggle for democracy in the UK and for gender equality in higher education. They provide insights into educational reform, advancements in science and art and social and political change in the world in which these women lived.Some women were rewarded with professional recognition and personal accolades for their contributions to their discipline, culture and social reform. Others, despite equally significant contributions, received much less attention and reward. It falls to later generations to uncover their achievements and restore their reputations. Find our more about these women here.[[{"fid":"8519","view_mode":"large","fields":{"height":"1510","width":"2347","class":"media-element file-large","format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Record card Aimee Nimr","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EStudent%20registry%20card%20for%20Slade%20student%2C%20Aimee%20Nimr%20(1907-1974).%20After%20graduating%2C%20Nimr%20became%20a%20driving%20force%20in%20the%20Art%20and%20Liberty%20Group%20founded%20in%201930s%20Cairo.%20Its%20members%20%26ndash%3B%20Surrealist%20artists%2C%20poets%20and%20writers%20%26ndash%3B%20aspired%20to%20connect%20art%20with%20social%20issues%2C%20particularly%20the%20impact%20of%20World%20War%20II%20on%20Egypt.%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"height":"1510","width":"2347","class":"media-element file-large","format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Record card Aimee Nimr","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EStudent%20registry%20card%20for%20Slade%20student%2C%20Aimee%20Nimr%20(1907-1974).%20After%20graduating%2C%20Nimr%20became%20a%20driving%20force%20in%20the%20Art%20and%20Liberty%20Group%20founded%20in%201930s%20Cairo.%20Its%20members%20%26ndash%3B%20Surrealist%20artists%2C%20poets%20and%20writers%20%26ndash%3B%20aspired%20to%20connect%20art%20with%20social%20issues%2C%20particularly%20the%20impact%20of%20World%20War%20II%20on%20Egypt.%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"1510","width":"2347","class":"media-element file-large"}}]]Exploring new disciplinesDisrupters and Innovators is displayed across four cases in UCL's Octagon Gallery. In the second part of the exhibition, each case addresses a different area of academic study: Archaeology, Art, Science, and Politics and Society. Visitors can explore how women pioneered new disciplines and their often interdisciplinary approaches.ArchaeologyArchaeology was a new science at the end of the 19th century. The study of Egypt – Egyptology – was on the edge of this new science. It did not require the same formal qualifications, such as knowing Latin and Greek, demanded by more established subjects. As women were less likely to have these qualifications, Egyptology was easier for them to enter.The attitude of the first UCL Professor of Egyptology, Flinders Petrie, was crucial to women’s advancement in this subject. Petrie helped to transform archaeology from treasure-hunting to a scientific discipline, and his collection is held at the UCL museum established in his name. Petrie's own career was made possible by the generosity and support of women, particularly his benefactor Amelia Edwards and his protégé Margaret Murray, who is featured below.Murray enabled Petrie to make long trips to Egypt to carry out excavations, as she taught most of UCL's Egyptology classes. Her high profile as a scholar, teacher and advocate for women’s rights in turn contributed to the subject’s popularity with women. In 1907, Manchester University Museum received a rare collection of two mummies, complete with the contents of their tomb, and Murray worked to catalogue the objects. A year later she took part in the public unwrapping of one of the mummies to an audience of 500 with extensive media coverage.[[{"fid":"8467","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Margaret Murray, mummy unwrapping","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EMargaret%20Murray%20and%20team%20unwrapping%20the%20mummies%20of%20the%20%26lsquo%3BTwo%20Brothers%26rsquo%3B%20at%20Manchester%20University%20Museum%20in%201908.%20%26copy%3B%20Courtesy%20of%20Manchester%20Museum%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Margaret Murray, mummy unwrapping","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EMargaret%20Murray%20and%20team%20unwrapping%20the%20mummies%20of%20the%20%26lsquo%3BTwo%20Brothers%26rsquo%3B%20at%20Manchester%20University%20Museum%20in%201908.%20%26copy%3B%20Courtesy%20of%20Manchester%20Museum%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"1772","width":"2490","class":"media-element file-large"}}]]“The shelf is not a comfortable place and I have no desire to be on it...I look forward to working till the last."Egyptologist Margaret Murray aged 100, autobiography, 1963ArtThe Slade School of Fine Art was founded in 1871. Teaching was grounded in the study of the human figure, setting the Slade apart from other schools. The admission of women to study alongside men formed another radical departure from established models. The Royal Academy followed suit nearly twenty years later, with other disciplines at UCL even slower to adopt a co-education approach: medicine was the latest in 1917-18.The Slade influenced women’s integration into wider College life and society, and many Slade women worked across disciplines or were involved in socio-political reform. Female students quickly outnumbered male ones at the Slade and their achievements were recognised by prizes. While 45% of the artists in the Slade Collection are women, many including Clara Klinghoffer (featured below), Winifred Knights and Aimee (Amy) Nimr in the exhibition, remain largely unknown today.Clara Klinghoffer (1900-1970) was an Austrian Jewish émigré who enrolled at the Slade in 1918. A year later, she won second prize for Figure Drawing and received the Orpen Bursary for students who ‘intend to become Professional Artists’. Promoted by influential artists such as Sir Jacob Epstein and Alfred Wolmark, she presented her first critically acclaimed exhibition in 1919. Reviewers compared her to the grand master of Italian Renaissance, Raphael. Journeys of early 20th-century women artists like Klinghoffer are explored in the UCL Art Museum's 2018 exhibition Prize & Prejudice. [[{"fid":"8531","view_mode":"medium","fields":{"format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Clara Klinghoffer © The artist's estate","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cdiv%3E%3Cp%3EClara%20Klinghoffer%2C%20%3Cem%3EFive%20Studies%20of%20a%20Female%20Nude%2C%3C%2Fem%3E%20c.1918-1919%2C%20pencil.%20UCL%20Art%20Museum%206075%26nbsp%3B%26copy%3B%20The%20artist%26%2339%3Bs%20estate%3C%2Fp%3E%3C%2Fdiv%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Clara Klinghoffer © The artist's estate","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cdiv%3E%3Cp%3EClara%20Klinghoffer%2C%20%3Cem%3EFive%20Studies%20of%20a%20Female%20Nude%2C%3C%2Fem%3E%20c.1918-1919%2C%20pencil.%20UCL%20Art%20Museum%206075%26nbsp%3B%26copy%3B%20The%20artist%26%2339%3Bs%20estate%3C%2Fp%3E%3C%2Fdiv%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"800","width":"504","class":"media-element file-medium"}}]]“Girl Who Draws Like Raphael - Success at 19"—Review of artist Clara Klinghoffer’s exhibition in The Daily Graphic, 1919Politics and SocietyWomen’s and workers’ rights, prison reform, education and Irish independence were key social and political concerns of the early 20th century. Women working across the sciences and humanities at UCL became forces for change in these areas, often alongside significant contributions in their own disciplines.Constance Markievicz (née Gore-Booth) was the first woman elected to the British House of Commons in 1918. She became an MP for a Dublin constituency while in prison, along with many Sinn Féin MPs who were political prisoners at this time. As with other Sinn Féin MPs, then and now, Markievicz did not take her seat in Parliament.Markievicz previously studied at the Slade School of Art and she became increasingly involved in the suffrage cause during this time. Despite her aristocratic background and marriage to a Polish count, she felt passionately about art and workers’ rights throughout her life. She was imprisoned and sentenced to death for her part in the 1916 Easter Rising against British rule, but was later released under a general amnesty.[[{"fid":"8543","view_mode":"medium","fields":{"height":"5688","width":"3960","class":"media-element file-medium","format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Constance Markievicz","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cdiv%3E%3Cp%3EDigital%20reproduction%20of%20studio%20portrait%20of%20Countess%20Constance%20Markievicz%2C%20Keogh%20Brothers%20Ltd%2C%20c.1910-1927%20NPA%20POLF206%20%26copy%3B%20National%20Library%20of%20Ireland%3C%2Fp%3E%3C%2Fdiv%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"height":"5688","width":"3960","class":"media-element file-medium","format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Constance Markievicz","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cdiv%3E%3Cp%3EDigital%20reproduction%20of%20studio%20portrait%20of%20Countess%20Constance%20Markievicz%2C%20Keogh%20Brothers%20Ltd%2C%20c.1910-1927%20NPA%20POLF206%20%26copy%3B%20National%20Library%20of%20Ireland%3C%2Fp%3E%3C%2Fdiv%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"5688","width":"3960","class":"media-element file-medium"}}]]“...When I urged that the women’s suffrage movement had gone too far to be stopped he disagreed."—Reformer Isabel Fry reflecting on a conversation with retired Judge Bacon, known for his anti-feminist views, 1911Sciencey the 1990s, the scientific community had started to uncover the missing histories of women scientists. Disciplines such as botany and geology had long traditions of amateur contributors, often women, alongside professionals. The uncertain career paths offered in emerging scientific disciplines were often less attractive to men, and new disciplines often had less defined entry paths, or involved applied research that carried less academic prestige. These circumstances all provided opportunities for women to further develop research and careers.Dame Kathleen Lonsdale (née Yardley) (1903-1971) is pictured below. She was one of the first two women to become a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1945, and the following year she founded a research group in Crystallography at UCL. In 1949, Lonsdale became the university's first female professor and she received both the Royal Society’s Davy Medal and a DBE in under a decade.During her lifetime, Lonsdale worked with influential professors such as William Bragg and Christopher Ingold. Nobel Prize winners Bragg and his son Lawrence pioneered the use of X-rays to determine crystal structures, and Lonsdale applied this technique to the petrochemical benzene, confirming its long-disputed structure. As a scientist she worked at many institutions but UCL was her first, last and longest. UCL marked her legacy by naming a university building in her honour, the only building to be named after a women. The refurbished Kathleen Lonsdale Building is located on UCL’s main Bloomsbury campus.[[{"fid":"8471","view_mode":"large","fields":{"height":"1308","width":"1772","class":"media-element file-small","format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Kathleen Lonsdale with crystal models","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EKathleen%20Lonsdale%20with%20crystal%20models%2C%20photographer%20unknown%2C%20c.1946.%20Courtesy%20of%20Professor%20Ian%20Wood%2C%20UCL%20Earth%20Sciences%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"height":"1308","width":"1772","class":"media-element file-small","format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Kathleen Lonsdale with crystal models","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EKathleen%20Lonsdale%20with%20crystal%20models%2C%20photographer%20unknown%2C%20c.1946.%20Courtesy%20of%20Professor%20Ian%20Wood%2C%20UCL%20Earth%20Sciences%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"1308","width":"1772","class":"media-element file-large"}}]]“...questioning of the established order is the hallmark of the true scientific outlook..."—Crystallographer Dame Kathleen Lonsdale, The Melbourne Herald, 1966Behind the exhibitionDisrupters and Innovators is part of Vote 100 at UCL in 2018. Find out more about the background to this exhibition below:The history of women at UCLThis exhibition is part of UCL's year-long Vote 100 programme, which marks the centenary of the Representation of the People Act that granted the vote to some women over the age of 30 in the UK.Beginning in the 1860s, UCL experimented with providing classes for women. From 1878, women could study alongside men and receive University of London degrees: the first time this had happened in the UK. It was not until 1918 that new legislation allowed the first women to vote in the UK. This was part of wider electoral reforms accelerated by World War I. Ten years later, women received equal voting rights with men. This process was a backdrop to the lives of female students and researchers at UCL and beyond in the early 20th century. However, co-education was not adopted in all subjects and female students and staff continued to face many obstacles.The UCL Vote 100 programme reveals the impact of the pioneering women who built the university, and imaginatively explore the battles still to be won. Find out more about UCL Vote 100 here.Working across UCLThis UCL Culture exhibition is curated by Dr Nina Pearlman, Head of UCL Art Collections,who also produced this interpretation text.Exhibition produced in association with:Maria Blyzinsky, Museum Consultant, The Exhibitions TeamVictoria Kingston, Interpretation Consultant, The Exhibitions TeamAngela Scott, Senior Graphic Designer, UCL Digital MediaDave Bellamy, Display Technician, Chiltern ExhibitionsUCL Culture would like to thank the following people for their support with the exhibition:Society: David Blackmore (UCL Slade School of Fine Art), Dr Georgina Brewis (UCL Institute of Education), Dr Claire Robins (UCL Institute of Education)Archaeology: Dr Emma Libonati (UCL Petrie Museum)Art: Helen Downes (UCL Art Museum), Grace Hailstone (UCL Slade School of Fine Art)Science: Deborah Furness (UCL Library Services), Lesley Hall (Wellcome Library), Dr Jenny Wilson (UCL Science & Technology Studies), Professor Ian Wood (UCL Earth Sciences)Thanks are extended also to:UCL Art Museum, Grant Museum of Zoology, Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UCL Geology Collection, UCL Pathology Collection, UCL Institute of Education Archives, UCL Library Services, UCL Records, UCL Special Collections UCL Special Collections, and UCL Slade School of Fine Art for their generous loans. 
Elephant images
Art by Animals
Art by Animals exhibits works of art from several species of animals, including paintings by elephants and apes, starts this week at UCL’s Grant Museum of Zoology in collaboration with artist Mick Tuck, a graduate from the UCL Slade School of Fine Art.  YouTube Widget Placeholderhttps://youtu.be/V8AdN1pdM-M Since the mid-50s zoos have used art and painting as a leisure activity for the animals, also using the activities to raise funds for conservation or the zoo by selling the works.While many species in captivity have interacted with paint, the exhibition aims to ask visitors the question of whether animals can be creative and make art, and why some animal creations are considered valuable and creative, while others are dismissed as meaningless. Jack Ashby, Museum Manager, asks the big question  "Is this is actually art? While individual elephants are trained to always paint the same thing, art produced by apes is a lot more creative and is undistinguishable from abstract art by humans that use similar techniques"Featuring art by elephants, orang-utans, gorillas and chimps, exhibition co-curators Will and Mike Tuck have gathered paintings from locations as varied as Samutprakarn Zoo, Thailand (elephants); Erie Zoo, Pennsylvania, USA (gorilla, orang-utan); Saint Louis Zoo, Missouri, USA (chimp); and Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, Colorado, USA (orang-utan). The exhibition also includes specifically commissioned works from Erie Zoo.Images of monkeys painting date back at least to the 17th century in European art and possibly earlier but it wasn't until the 1950s that the actual animal paintings became a serious subject. This rise in popularity tied in with the emergence of the Abstract Expressionist movement in art which started to look closely at the act of mark making itself, and what it reveals about the artist’s subconscious. Within this newly emerging context the art of animals, particularly primates took on a radically different meaning.Animal art was first popularised by Granada TV’s Zoo Time, which started in 1956. The programme, which was presented by zoologist and artist Desmond Morris, included chimps painting live. One regular was the individual “Congo”, who went on have his own exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London in the late 50s, the catalogue for which is included in the exhibition.  Placing work by animals alongside specimens and historical documentation Art by Animals explore why some animal creations are considered valuable and creative, while others are dismissed as meaningless.
  1. previous
  2. 1
    ...
  3. 2
    ...
  4. 3
    ...
  5. 4
    ...
  6. 5
    ...
  7. 6
    ...
  8. 7
    ...
  9. 8
    ...
  10. 9
    ...
  11. 10
    ...
  12. 11
    ...
  13. 12
    ...
  14. 13
    ...
  15. 14
    ...
  16. 15
    ...
  17. 16
    ...
  18. 17
    ...
  19. 18
    ...
  20. 19
    ...
  21. 20
    ...
  22. 21
    ...
  23. next