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Elephant images
Art by Animals
Art by Animals exhibits works of art from several species of animals, including paintings by elephants and apes, starts this week at UCL’s Grant Museum of Zoology in collaboration with artist Mick Tuck, a graduate from the UCL Slade School of Fine Art.  YouTube Widget Placeholderhttps://youtu.be/V8AdN1pdM-M Since the mid-50s zoos have used art and painting as a leisure activity for the animals, also using the activities to raise funds for conservation or the zoo by selling the works.While many species in captivity have interacted with paint, the exhibition aims to ask visitors the question of whether animals can be creative and make art, and why some animal creations are considered valuable and creative, while others are dismissed as meaningless. Jack Ashby, Museum Manager, asks the big question  "Is this is actually art? While individual elephants are trained to always paint the same thing, art produced by apes is a lot more creative and is undistinguishable from abstract art by humans that use similar techniques"Featuring art by elephants, orang-utans, gorillas and chimps, exhibition co-curators Will and Mike Tuck have gathered paintings from locations as varied as Samutprakarn Zoo, Thailand (elephants); Erie Zoo, Pennsylvania, USA (gorilla, orang-utan); Saint Louis Zoo, Missouri, USA (chimp); and Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, Colorado, USA (orang-utan). The exhibition also includes specifically commissioned works from Erie Zoo.Images of monkeys painting date back at least to the 17th century in European art and possibly earlier but it wasn't until the 1950s that the actual animal paintings became a serious subject. This rise in popularity tied in with the emergence of the Abstract Expressionist movement in art which started to look closely at the act of mark making itself, and what it reveals about the artist’s subconscious. Within this newly emerging context the art of animals, particularly primates took on a radically different meaning.Animal art was first popularised by Granada TV’s Zoo Time, which started in 1956. The programme, which was presented by zoologist and artist Desmond Morris, included chimps painting live. One regular was the individual “Congo”, who went on have his own exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London in the late 50s, the catalogue for which is included in the exhibition.  Placing work by animals alongside specimens and historical documentation Art by Animals explore why some animal creations are considered valuable and creative, while others are dismissed as meaningless.
Photo by Naomi Salaman of life room at the Beaux-Arts in Paris 2004
Art Schools: Invention, Invective and Radical Possibilities (2010)
[[{"fid":"11435","view_mode":"xl","fields":{"format":"xl","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Naomi Salaman Life painting studio, Glasgow School of Art, early summer 2001","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Naomi Salaman Life painting studio, Glasgow School of Art, early summer 2001","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"Naomi Salaman, Life painting studio, Glasgow School of Art, early summer, 2001 © Naomi Salaman","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"xl","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Naomi Salaman Life painting studio, Glasgow School of Art, early summer 2001","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Naomi Salaman Life painting studio, Glasgow School of Art, early summer 2001","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"Naomi Salaman, Life painting studio, Glasgow School of Art, early summer, 2001 © Naomi Salaman","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"591","width":"736","class":"media-element file-xl"}}]]Investigating the intellectual and spatial legacy of the life-room.This conference considered the intellectual apparatus and physical spaces that structure art education today by exploring the history and legacy of the life room as both physical and intellectual space, and examining the traditions of looking and approaches to knowledge it established. Speakers included academics, curators and artists. See below for full conference programme.The conference was organised by UCL Art Museum, the Royal Collection and the University of Brighton in conjunction with Naomi Salaman's exhibition Looking Back at the Life Room at UCL Art Museum. It took place on Friday 11 June and Saturday 12 June 2010 Conference Programme Conference Programme9.30 - Registration and coffee10.00 - Introduction10.15 - Caravaggio, Annibale Carracci and life drawing in Baroque Rome - Martin Clayton (Deputy Curator of the Print Room, The Royal Collection)10.45 - A Day in 'the Life': The experience of studying at the Royal Academy of Arts in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries - Annette Wickham (Research Curator, Collections and Library, Royal Academy of Arts)11.15 - Coffee11.45 - Drawing the Figure from the Cast and Life - David Jeremiah (Leverhulme Emeritus Fellow)12.15 - The Redundant Rebus: Reality Checks on the Functioning of the Life Class - Deanna Petherbridge (Professor Emeritus University of the West of England, Bristol and Visiting Professor of Drawing, University of the Arts, London)12.45 - Discussion1.15 - Lunch (not provided)2.45 - Drawing from Objects: A Historical Perspective - Morna Hilton (Head of Learning, Victoria and Albert Museum)3.15 - When is Realistic too Realistic? - Ed Allington (Professor and Head of Graduate Sculpture, Slade School of Fine Art, UCL)3.45 - Discussion4.15 - TeaPanel: History and Practices of the Slade and Norwich Life Rooms:4.45 - The 'F' Studio 1970s to the Present - Jo Volley (Senior Lecturer, Painting, Slade School of Fine Art, UCL)5.00 - John Wonnacott and John Lessore: The Life Room at Norwich School of Art 1978-1985 - Lynda Morris (Curator EASTinternational and AHRC Research Fellow, Norwich University College of the Arts)5.15 - Don't go in there: Painting in the Slade Life Room 2003-07 - Geoff Stein (Artist)5.30 - Dot and Carry; point and scan - Tom Lomax (Lecturer, Sculpture, Slade School of Fine Art, UCL)5.45 - Discussion6.15 - Reception and Private View of the exhibition Looking Back at the Life RoomSaturdayTransitions in art education 1960s - 1970s10.00 - Introduction10.15 - Drawing Parallels between Life and Art: Challenges to the Art School in Fifties and Sixties Britain - Ben Cranfield (Lecturer in Arts Management, Department of Media and Cultural Studies, Birbeck College)10.45 - 'Audience-free' Practices and the Art School Panopticon - Chris Dorsett (Reader in Art School Practices, Department of Arts, School of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Northumbria)11.15 - Coffee11.45 - Excavating the British Art School - Matthew Cornford (Professor of Fine Art, Faculty of Arts, University of Brighton) and John Beck (Senior Lecturer, School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics, Newcastle University)12.15 - Yurts, Bars and Trailer Parks: Anti-Paradigms for the New Art School - Steven Henry Madoff (Senior Critic, Yale University School of Art)12.45 - Discussion1.15 - Lunch (not provided)Production of the art student as subject2.45 - A Body in Part (performance) - Yuen Fong Ling (PhD Student, University of Lincoln)3.45 - Tea4.15 - Between the Studio and the Seminar: What does art-school's double language do? - Mary Anne Francis (Senior Lecturer Critical Fine Art Practice, University of Brighton and Research Fellow in Writing and Art, Chelsea College of Art)4.45 - Micropolitics of Art and Economy in the Art School Today - Susan Kelly (Course Leader BA Fine Art and History of Art (Studio Practice) Department of Art, Goldsmith's College, University of London)5.15 - Under Construction: Alternative Art School SpRoUt - Amy Cunningham (Senior Lecturer, Music and Visual Art, University of Brighton), Hayley Skipper (Arts Development Officer, Forestry Commission, Grizedale Forest) and Hannah Chiswell (MA Fine Art, Slade School of Fine Art)5.45 - Discussion6.15 - Close  
Artefacts of Excavation
Artefacts of Excavation
‘Artefacts of Excavation’ is a 3-year, AHRC-funded collaborative project led by Dr Alice Stevenson at UCL, and Professor John Baines at the University of Oxford.From the 1880s to the 1980s British excavations at sites across Egypt resulted in the discovery of tens of thousands of objects. A large proportion were exported from Egypt and distributed to an estimated 200 museums around the world before they were fully documented or published.  'Artefacts of Excavation' is an ambitious project that will create an online resource for the relocation and re-contextualization of these objects, and will explore the role of these distributions in the development of archaeology and museology. [[{"fid":"3405","view_mode":"xl","fields":{"format":"xl","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"ohi1.jpg","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"xl","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"ohi1.jpg","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"1025","width":"1402","class":"media-element file-xl"},"link_text":null}]]The project aims to address the following questions:What was the scale and scope of the distribution of finds from British excavations in Egypt between 1880 and 1980? Where are these collections now?What do these finds distributions reveal about the changing relationship between museums, field archaeology and the development of research between 1880 and 1980?How were local, regional, national, and international identities (including colonial relations) negotiated through the circulation of antiquities from Egypt? How may these be understood in relation to questions of the ownership of Egyptian heritage today?How were ancient Egyptian artefacts from British excavations accommodated within different museums around the world? How may these local narratives be linked with wider developments in archaeology and museology?Project CollaboratorsThe Griffith Institute, University of OxfordEgypt Exploration SocietyProject conferenceApril 7-8 2016, University College London, Institute of Archaeology, G6The conference outline is available here and the conference programme here.The book of abstracts is also available here.[[{"fid":"3397","view_mode":"xl","fields":{"format":"xl","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"uc25969.jpg","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"xl","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"uc25969.jpg","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":"559","width":"924","class":"media-element file-xl"}}]]Project websiteHosted at the Griffith Institute: http://egyptartefacts.griffith.ox.ac.uk/This website is not only a repository for the project outcomes. It also forms a central tool of our research and a point of engagement with museums worldwide. We will be posting here resources to help people identify and more fully understand excavated objects in collections, as well as sharing some of the stories that lie behind artefacts from British fieldwork in Egypt now dispersed across the globe. Our focus will be on the fieldwork of the Egypt Exploration Fund (EEF)/Society (EES), and the British School of Archaeology in Egypt (BSAE)/Egyptian Research Account (ERA).Project publicationsStevenson, A., Libonati, E. and Williams. A. forthcoming (May 2016) 'A selection of minor antiquities: a multi-sited view on collections from excavations in Egypt. World Archaeology 48(2) Stevenson, A. 2016. Conflict antiquities and conflicted antiquities: challenging the sale of legally excavated artefacts. Antiquity  90: 229-236 http://dx.doi.org/10.15184/aqy.2015.188Stevenson, A. and Libonati, E. 2015. Artefacts of Excavation. Egyptian Archaeology 46: 27-29. Stevenson, A. 2015. Between the field and the museum: the ongoing project of archaeological context. Egyptian and Egyptological Documents Archives Libraries 4: 109-118Stevenson, A. 2014. Artefacts of excavation: the collection and distribution of Egyptian finds to museums, 1880–1915. Journal of the History of Collections 26(1): 89–102. 
Projection viewed through a display case
Artist Collaborations
10 years |150 artists respond to 500 years of art in UCL's collections. Exploring the contemporary relevance of the art collections at UCL and the key narratives they impart has been at the core of UCL Art Museum's activity over the past decade. ​The fact that works in the Museum’s Collections were either explicitly collected for the purpose of instruction or were the product of a process of learning and experimentation by artists early on in their career, makes the Collections particularly suited for this undertaking. In their efforts to create something new and original, artists at any given time were considering the significance and relevance of the work by those who preceded them. UCL Art Museum is home to a core collection of work by emerging artists spanning 150 years. Since its foundational years in the late 19th century, the Slade School of Fine Art collected the prize-winning works that are now in trust with UCL Art Museum. With new works added to its collections annually through the prize-system a unique and dynamic collection of emerging artists was formed, a long time before this became common currency in the art world. These prize-winning works sit alongside historic collections, international in scope and spanning 500 years, that were donated by philanthropists who believed in the educational use of their art collections. This history and context makes UCL Art Museum's collections the perfect setting for the emergence of new ideas.Only a small percentage of UCL Art Collections are actually on display in the museum. As a result, that which is visible is in constant dialogue with the hidden and vice versa, bringing to the fore the tensions between access to art and the regulation of its visibility, a theme often explored in the museum's collaborations.In 2019 UCL Culture launched UCL Public Art with new commissions by Rachel Whiteread and Thompson & Craighead for UCL's Student Centre. UCL Public Art continues a tradition that began in 1851 with the UCL Flaxman Gallery and the first public art commission in 1865 Marmor Homericum from one of the most sought after contemporary artists of the time Henri Triqueti.  Together with UCL Peformance Lab, launched with the reopening of UCL's newly refurbished Bloomsbury Theatre, UCL Culture cements the role of artists at the interesection of research and audiences, amplifies the legacy of a decade of artist and curatorial collaborations and UCL's founding principles.Two activity strands underpin investigations of contemporary relevance of the collections: The annual UCL Art Museum/Slade Collaboration, Artist Commissions, Residencies & Curatorial Collaborations. The two strands frequently intertwine.The annual UCL Art Museum / Slade CollaborationThe annual UCL Art Museum/Slade Collaboration began in 2008 with an online exhibition, progressed to a weekend-pop-up, an annual exhibition and finally to funded artists residencies. All the projects began with an invitation to the Slade artists to make new work in response to the Collections. Throughout this past decade 150 artists have produced outstanding new work which is the outcome of their indpendent research. Some artists were at the begining of their educational journey, others more advanced. For some this opportunity was the first encounter with collections-based research. Many of the participating artists have since gone on to win major national and international awards and for many engagement with collections and interdisciplinary research continues to shape and inform a multi-faceted practice. This pioneering initiative went on to influence how the museum works with artists to interrogate its collections. UCL Culture at large embraced collaboration with artists as part of its core activity. This model has also encouraged other disciplines to engage with the Collections and has contributed to the institutional turn to interdidisciplinary research and integrated research and education. As such, this annual collaboration has prepared numerous emerging artists to embrace collaboration, develop their work beyond the studio, hone their public engagement skills and gain valuable experiences that serves them well on their chosen professional path. For each exhibition, the artists worked with the Museum team on all aspects of the exhibitions. A signficant component was also the development of the public programme, by creating events in which the artists engaged researchers from other disicplines and a wide range of audiences.This programme was led by artists Jon Thompson and Kate Bright from the Slade and Andrea Frederiscken and Nina Pearlman from UCL Art Museum.Further information about this collaboration is available in RE-LAUNCH, the catalogue accompanying the 2015 exhibition that includes a conversation about the collaboration between Dr Andrea Fredericksen, Curator UCL Art Collections, with Professor Susan Collins, former Director of the Slade. A video capturing the experience of participating artists in the 4th Annual Collaboration Vincula is available here.Exhibition list:Sequel (2009), Transfer (2010), Moreover (2011), Vincula (2012), Duet (2013), Second person looking out (2014), RE-LAUNCH (2015), Vault (2016), The composition has been reversed (2017), REDRESS (2018)Residencies and commissionsSince 2008 UCL Art Museum has initiated collaborative projects with contemporary artists and other partners through commissions, residencies and curatorial collaboration, linking current research at UCL across the disciplines with the collections and a wide range of audiences. Collaboration outputs range from performances, installations, exhibitions, talks and screenings. Projects include:Naomi Salaman, Looking back at the life room (2010), Nelly Dimitranova Flaxman Gallery (2012), Nadine Mahoney, ANON (2012), Marcia Farquhar, Flaxman Exchange (2013), Edward Allington & Jo Volley, Plasterd (2013), Kristina Clackson Bonnington, Girl at the Door (2015), Edward Allington, Neil Jefferies & Gary Woodley,  Roderick Tye: The Human Presence (2015), Helena Hunter & Mark Peter Wright, Cabinets of Curiosity (2016), Eloise Lawson, Ruins in a Landscape (2016), David Blackmore (2016, 2017) Liz Rideal Splicing Time (2017), Lisa Gornick, Lisa Gornick Regrets (2017), Tai Shani,  Spirit of Slade Ladies Past (2018), Robert Mead (2019)    
light-bulb-1246043_1920.jpg
Beacon Bursaries
For over 13 years now, the Engagement Team at UCL Culture has run the flagship Beacon Bursary Funding Scheme to advance the practice and culture of public and community engagement within UCL.   We’re thrilled to have awarded eleven bursaries in 2020. Find out about the projects funded last year at this web link.  The 2021/2022 Beacon Bursary funding round is now open. Applications will be accepted up to the deadline of midday on Monday 13th December 2021. Who can apply: Any current member of UCL staff (both academic and professional services) or UCL postgraduate research students can apply. If you are at UCL on an honorary contract, your proposed project must be related to UCL research or teaching. With support from UCL East we also have dedicated funding for projects working with communities in east London.  We also encourage applications for projects from teaching fellows that will foster connections and bring mutual benefit for UCL students and target communities.  Before you apply We strongly advise that before you submit an application you read the following: Beacon Bursary Funding Scheme Guidance (pdf)For project examples and names of previous award holders, you can download a full list of all previously funded projects. Or you can see more information about projects funded in 2020 and 2019.  How to apply This year we are separating out what goes to our panel for consideration and what information we collect as UCL Engagement. So applications will have two parts:1. The panel application document. The information collected here will be shared with the Beacon Bursary Panel. No additional information will be shared with them. Once completed, please upload (as a word of pdf file) using the online form linked below. For guidance with the panel application, please see the panel application guidance document.2. The online form will be where you upload the panel application and UCL Engagement will collect information that will form part of the evaluation and review of the funding scheme. This collection will be aggregated, and individual records will not be kept. This includes personal diversity information. None of this information will be shared with the panel.Please complete both parts of the application by midday on Monday 13th December 2021. If you have any queries or concerns regarding your application, please contact publicengagement@ucl.ac.uk  Support for applicants 20 minute support and advice sessions with members of the public engagement team will be available to book by contacting publicengagement@ucl.ac.uk with the following information:  A short sentence on your project idea What School or Research Department you work within Whether your project connects with communities in east London.  Timeslot preference (we will assign you a 20 minute slot within this time) These are the available timeslots. All timeslots are available to all applicants, please let us know if you would like to talk specifically to any specialist available for that slot. More timeslots may be added in future, so please check this webpage for more options for dates / specialist advice.  Wednesday 24th November. 10:00 - 12:30. General advice & projects in east London. Wednesday 1st December. 13:30 - 15:30. General advice. Friday 3rd December. 13:30 - 16:00. Research & teaching with education & social sciences. Monday 6th December 10:00 - 12:30. General advice & projects in east London.  Please be aware these timeslots fill up quickly and are first come, first served. Diversity & Demographic InformationAs part of our ongoing work to improve the inclusivity and accessibility of the scheme, we encourage applications from those who are underrepresented in the sector and at UCL including but, not exclusive, to disabled, D/deaf and neurodiverse people, LGBTQ+ people, people from Black, Asian and Ethnic Minority backgrounds. With this in mind, we hope to hold specialised support and advice sessions with representatives from various networks at the university. We will post updates on this here on this webpage.  We are also asking for demographic information in two places. There may be duplication, but this way, you the applicant has control over where demographic information is shared:As part of the online application form. These questions are not compulsory. Any information you give here will not be seen by the judging panel and, therefore, will not inform funding decisions. We are collecting this data for the purpose of evaluation and reporting as this can help inform us how we can improve the diversity of project applicants for future Beacons Bursaries. This information will be unlinked from your application by a member of the UCL public engagement team and will be stored anonymously. As part of the panel application document, which will be shared with the panel, this way you can provide additional information for the panel to consider.  [[{"fid":"6595","view_mode":"medium","fields":{"height":"500","width":"800","class":"media-element file-medium","format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Beatboxing image","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Beatboxing after laryngectomy ","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":" Beatboxing after laryngectomy, a Beacon Bursary funded project led by Dr Evangelos Himonides ","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"height":"500","width":"800","class":"media-element file-small","format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Beatboxing image","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Beatboxing after laryngectomy ","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3E%3Cem%3E%26nbsp%3BBeatboxing%20after%20laryngectomy%2C%20a%20Beacon%20Bursary%20funded%20project%20led%20by%20%3Ca%20href%3D%22https%3A%2F%2Firis.ucl.ac.uk%2Firis%2Fbrowse%2Fprofile%3Fupi%3DEHIMO21%22%3EDr%20Evangelos%20Himonides%3C%2Fa%3E%26nbsp%3B%3C%2Fem%3E%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"2":{"height":"500","width":"800","class":"media-element file-medium","format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Beatboxing image","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Beatboxing after laryngectomy ","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":" Beatboxing after laryngectomy, a Beacon Bursary funded project led by Dr Evangelos Himonides ","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"500","width":"800","class":"media-element file-medium"}}]]  
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