Skip to site navigation

Robert Hazell gives evidence to Liaison Committee on public appointments

16 June 2011

Whitehall

Robert Hazell today appeared before the House of Commons Liaison Committee as expert witnesses on the issue of parliamentary involvement in key public appointments.

In February 2010, the Unit published a report that evaluating the scrutiny processes undertaken for top appointments which fed into the Liaison Committee's first report.


The Liaison Committee comprises the chairs of all the major Commons select committees. Following the Unit's report, it launched a short inquiry on Parliament's role in key public appointments, which included today's evidence session with Prof Hazell, and a hearing with Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude MP.

The committee is expected to publish a report with recommendations for reform to the current system.

Further Information

Join the Debate

Blog

News

A new bicameral parliament for Italy?

Thu, 16 Apr 2015 09:00:16 +0000

The Italian Parliament is presently involved in an effort to thoroughly revise the design and powers of the Senate. Carlo Fusaro outlines the background to the ‘perfect bicameralism’ that has existed in Italy until now and the nature of the current reforms. He argues that diversification of the two chambers is long overdue, and addresses […]

Read more...

The Succession to the Crown Act 2013 has landed

Mon, 13 Apr 2015 10:00:35 +0000

On Friday 26 March 2015 the 2013 Succession to the Crown Act was finally brought into force. Bob Morris offers an overview of the Act and explains why it has taken so long to come into effect. At practically the last gasp of the now dissolved Parliament, the bringing into force of the Succession to […]

Read more...

The Speaker election row tells us two important things about parliament

Thu, 09 Apr 2015 09:00:40 +0000

On 26 March, its final sitting day, the House of Commons rejected government proposals to reform how the Speaker is elected at the start of the new parliament. Here Meg Russell reflects on what this teaches us about parliament, suggesting it holds two lessons. First, that the 2010 House of Commons was more resistant than […]

Read more...
Mailing List

Connect with us

RSSFlickr

Footer menu