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Prospectus

Student Testimonials

Rishi Raj Banerjee - Year 1

Tell us a little about your background and your motivation to apply to UCL?

I was born and raised in Singapore and studied as an international student in South East Asia where I obtained the International Baccalaureate Diploma. UCL immediately stood out as an obvious choice for me, the MBBS programme at UCL is a very relevant and modern one, strengthened by its association with leading research projects and its emphasis on striking a balance between theory and practice. The facilities available to a UCL medical student are second to none.

What features of the medical degree programme and your general experience at UCL would you recommend to others considering applying to study here?

The Medical Programme at UCL allows flexibility in learning, allowing students to take responsibility for their own learning and to proceed through the programme at a pace that is suitable for them. I’ve also appreciated the fact that the programme doesn’t put undue pressure on students with constant assessments and unrealistic deadlines.

There is a steady and directional structure in place that puts students on the right path without causing unnecessary stress and anxiety. The ‘spiral-learning’ methodology is also something very positive about the programme. The revisiting of areas of knowledge, perhaps in different clinical contexts, is a process which develops longterm knowledge, helping students to break out of the ‘exam-mode’ mould.

Negin Damali Amiri - Year 4

What features of the medical degree programme and your general experience at UCL would you recommend to others considering applying to study here?

If I had to apply to Medical School again, UCL would still be my first choice. Despite our intense timetable I have still been able to carry out activities I’m interested in. Being the medical students’ senior president, and representing the views of students both at a union and university level, has given me the opportunity to practise and improve my interests and skills in leadership, management and medical politics. Through joining the horse riding society, I have had the chance to try this sport for the first time. I have also been able to study Spanish as a student-selected component, with the aim of possibly travelling to South-America for my electives.

At an academic level, I have also built on my research interests by participating in research projects during my summer holidays and during the academic year, and I can only thank the university and Medical School for all the opportunities given to students during and even after our studies here.

Tell us a little about your choice of iBSc and what this involves.

UCL is one of the world-renowned universities for neurosciences, and it was a privilege to have studied this subject in more depth during my iBSc. I aspire to pursue a career in neurology and my iBSc project and modules played a key role in my decision-making.

What advice would you give to prospective applicants?

My advice to prospective students would be to choose your degree programme and university wisely. Studying medicine is more than just learning concepts; it’s about growing into an empathetic individual who can deal with the multi-dimensional challenges of medicine.

Damian Bruce-Hickman - Year 3 (iBSc)

What features of the medical degree programme and your general experience at UCL would you recommend to others considering applying to study here?

In terms of studying medicine at UCL, the absolutely invaluable learning tool that most universities now do not offer is dissection. To see a particular organ in real life for me was paramount to learning anatomy. Books and models did not compare.

Tell us a little about your choice of iBSc and what this involves.

I am currently studying for an iBSc in Physiology. What I have appreciated about this year is the opportunity to branch out and learn about your own areas of interest.

The best thing about this year is the opportunity to study under world class supervision – my iBSc project is based at the Hatter Cardiovascular Institute, which is a world leader in cardiac reperfusion injury.

The diversity inside of one BSc is also reflected in the choice of BSc degrees available – ranging from Philosophy to Surgical Sciences.

What advice would you give to prospective applicants?

Above research ethos and academic goals, I have found UCL Medical School to be a very supportive institute. The interviews at UCL were in my opinion the most relaxed and supportive ones I attended. However – come prepared. Why do you want to study here, what is the attraction of UCL, and what can you offer to the university?

Jack Marjot - Year 3 (iBSc)

Tell us a little about your background and your motivation to apply to UCL

Medicine was always the subject I wanted to do at university and pursue as a career. For me, London was undoubtedly the best place to do this; being a busy hub of culture and entertainment and home to some of the best hospitals in the world.

UCL in particular seemed to have this lively atmosphere and sense of student life, whilst also having the academic renown to set me in good stead for a career in Medicine.

Has your experience at UCL lived up to your expectation?

My student experience at UCL has gone far beyond my expectations.

What features of the medical degree programme and your general
experience at UCL would you recommend to others considering
applying to study here?

The individual identity that Medics at UCL have as part of ‘RUMS’ is one of the most attractive features of UCL Medical School. RUMS is a large and supportive community, with its own sports teams, societies and socials. Belonging to RUMS gives Medics a strong sense of identity, whilst allowing them to be fully involved in the wider community of UCL.

Tell us a little about your choice of iBSc and what this involves.

I chose to do an iBSc in Physiology, which covers areas as diverse as the physiology of space and high altitude. It has been both an interesting and refreshing year. Part of the programme involves spending a time in a laboratory conducting original research, often using state-of-the-art technology. This is an exciting opportunity – for the first time you feel as though you are actually contributing to science, rather than learning it.

What advice would you give to prospective applicants?

Come to UCL with an open mind, and a preparedness to get involved in as many aspects of student life as possible. You’ll have more opportunities in your six years at UCL than you will at any other point in your life – so make the most of it.

Katherine Belessiotis - Year 1

Tell us a little about your background and your motivation to
apply to UCL

I am half Canadian and half Greek, however I grew up in Brussels as my parents work for the European Institutions. I completed my BSc in Anatomy and Developmental Biology at UCL in 2010 with first-class Honours and applied to the Medical School in my final year of that programme. The reasons I applied here relate mainly to my first experience as well as the reputation of the Medical School. 

As an international student and having lived in London for three years, I wanted to stay in the dynamic and multi-cultural environment which I had previously experienced here.

What features of the medical degree programme and your general experience at UCL would you recommend to others considering applying?

UCL is a very good university, the programme is incredibly dynamic with a variety of different teaching styles including practicals, lectures, selfpaced and problem-based learning amongst others. There is also a lot of patient contact and community placements - this has really made me feel like a doctor in training as opposed to a pre-clinical student; it is really interesting to be able to apply what we learn in lectures to actual patients.

I have also managed to set up an independent research project in the Research Department of Cell and Developmental Biology as a Student Selected Component which I absolutely love and really complements the programme by having a purely scientific quality. I would definitely recommend prospective student to apply for quality of the programme as well as the quality of the societies and social atmosphere.

Bryony Alderman - Year 3 (iBSc)

Tell us a little about your background and your motivation
to apply to UCL I came to UCL straight from school.

I was attracted to study in London by the excellent reputation of the teaching hospitals here, and took advice from previous and existing students, who all enjoyed their time studying in the city. UCL in particular I found immediately very welcoming, and I knew I could expect a high standard of teaching and a wealth of opportunities.

Has your experience at UCL lived up to your expectation?

Finding myself at university in the heart of London was initially very intimidating, but I think there is a real sense of community within the university. The programme has certainly lived up to my expectations; undoubtedly hard work, but immensely rewarding to look back at the end of the year and see just how much you've learnt.

Tell us a little about your choice of iBSc and what this involves.

I am currently studying the iBSc in Paediatrics and Child Health, which is based at the UCL Institute of Child Health. This has been an excellent opportunity to further my interest in paediatric medicine. I have learnt a great deal more about the health services available for children, and how schools, social services, and all the different levels of healthcare (primary, secondary, tertiary etc) fit into this complex network.

What advice would you give to prospective applicants?

Of course, there's the obvious advice to work hard. However, I think medicine is also very much about having the right attitude towards others, and being able to relate to patients, speak to them, put them at their ease. A good amount of work experience will help to develop these skills, and will also help you to establish whether medicine is really the career you want to follow- it's a lot of study to do if your heart's not really in it!

Alistair Thorburn - Year 5

Tell us a little about your background and your motivation to apply to UCL?

I am a mature student, married with three young children, and a 15 year background in retail. When I was 34 I sold my business and realised that the next thing I did would be for the rest of my working life. When I was young and before my efforts at school fizzled out it was always my dream to be a doctor.

I wasn’t quite sure if this was now a realistic goal but talking to a member of the medical admissions here at UCL made me believe it was possible. I went to my local college and studied 4 A levels whilst working part-time at my local hospital.

Has your experience at UCL lived up to your expectation?

Yes and more, I thought I might just study and that would be it. Being older I thought I might not socialise all that much but there are many graduates and mature students studying medicine here and I have a large group of friends. I started playing rugby again and captained the Medics 3rd XV last year.

I've got involved with the admissions department doing tours, talks and interviews. After my Orthopaedic module last year I've stayed on in a clinic to assist with a study. I've received bursaries and scholarships which have been a godsend.