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ALCS Call for papers

The 10th biennial conference of the Association for Low Countries Studies will be held from 10-12 September 2014 at University College London and the Dutch Centre in the City of London (Austin Friars). This year’s theme will be “Discord and Consensus” in a Low Countries context and original contributions are invited that interpret the conference theme in the broadest possible sense. More...

Publiseret: Mar 3, 2014 4:05:46 PM

Dutch Crossing : Journal of Low Countries Studies

Dutch Crossing: Journal of Low Countries Studies 38.1 (March 2013)

At the beginning of this first issue of 2014 let me draw your attention to the forthcoming tenth biennial conference of the Association for Low Countries Studies, which under the theme of Discord and Consensus will be held at University College London and the (new) Dutch Centre in the (old) Dutch Church at Austin Friars in the City of London,1 in September 2014. All countries, regions, and institutions are ultimately built on a degree of consensus, on a collective commitment to a concept, belief, or value system. This consensus is continuously rephrased and reinvented through a narrative of cohesion and challenged by expressions of discontent and discord. The history of the Low Countries is characterized by both a striving for consensus and eruptions of discord both internally or through outside challenges. In the centenary year of World War I (1914), which the Netherlands was lucky to be spared but Belgium and Luxembourg had to endure heavily, two centuries (and a bit) after the Battle of Waterloo and the reunification of the Low Countries in the Kingdom of the United Netherlands (1813–14), and three centuries after the Peace of Utrecht (1713), we thought this to be an appropriate theme for an interdisciplinary conference which aims to explore consensus and discord in a Low Countries context along and across broad cultural, linguistic, and historical lines, and interpret the conference theme in the broadest possible sense. More...

Publiseret: Mar 1, 2014 11:05:00 AM


Theo van Doesburg: Contra-composition of Dissonances XVI

The study of Dutch history, language and culture has a long and distinguished past at UCL. It began in 1919 with the founding of a Chair of Dutch History and the establishment of a Department of Dutch.

Since then, its remit has expanded to the entire Low Countries, including Belgium and Luxembourg as well as the Netherlands. Today, it includes a full programme of research, teaching, publications, and events. The centre’s location at UCL in London provides direct access to:

  • Massive collections of Dutch books, manuscripts, prints, and maps that rival, in some cases, those in Amsterdam, The Hague and Brussels
  • Dutch and Flemish art collections with major masterpieces at the National Gallery and several other museums
  • The largest Dutch-language library of any UK university
  • A concentration of expertise that is unique in the Anglophone world.