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Reading Recovery celebrates continued success in improving children's literacy

9 June 2016

The International Literacy Centre (ILC) will celebrate another year of success with its Reading Recovery programme at an awards ceremony on Friday 10 June.

Reading Recovery 2015

Teachers and school managers who have made an outstanding contribution to improving children's literacy through Reading Recovery will receive awards across a number of categories, and children will be recognised for their achievements in literacy.

The ceremony follows the second Read Aloud campaign, which was highly successful earlier this year and saw several influential figures lend their support, such as actor Gillian Anderson and footballer Jack Butland.

Awards will be given across several categories and presented by special guests, including award-winning writer, comedian and actress Katy Brand, who is passionate about children's literacy and will announce the winner of the children's writing awards.

Jack McNicholl, from Arsenal football club's 'Arsenal in the Community' project, which promotes literacy and learning in the local community, will give out the children's reading awards.

The Reading Recovery School and Teacher of the Year awards will be presented by Kim Johnson, President of the National Association of Head Teachers.

Speaking of the awards, Kim said:

"It has always been a challenge to get children and young adults with learning disabilities to see reading as an important skill and, in time, an absolute joy. My Special Academy staff have shown a magical touch with our students. I am very pleased to be taking part in the awards ceremony, to recognise the tremendous impact of Reading Recovery and celebrate the successes of all involved."

For over 25 years, the ILC has helped thousands of children with wide-ranging literacy difficulties learn to read. Many teachers testify to the transformative success of these teaching methods in enabling children who are struggling with literacy to become proficient readers.

Claudia Cotton, Reading Recovery Teacher from Whitefield, Liverpool, said:
"Reading Recovery is the thread of hope which weaves through the school, giving the children the tools to transform their own lives, whatever their circumstances."

Alfie Barwise from English Martyrs' Catholic Primary School, Preston, and Lancashire, one of the winners of the children's writing award, said: "When my mum is in pain, I cheer her up by reading to her. It makes her smile."

Julia Douetil, Director of the IOE's Reading Recovery programme said:

"It's the joy you notice - these children are reading and writing not just for pleasure, but with pleasure, and that is amazing for children who were, just a few months ago, the lowest attaining in their class for literacy. That's what makes Reading Recovery teachers so special; they don't just teach children how to read - they do so in ways that make children feel good about being readers and writers."

" "It's the joy you notice - these children are reading and writing not just for pleasure, but with pleasure, and that is amazing for children who were, just a few months ago, the lowest attaining in their class for literacy."

A 20 week Reading Recovery course has been shown to help 85 per cent of six year old children move from being the lowest achievers in their class to catching up with their peers. At age 11, these children maintain their progress and achieve the expected Key Stage 2 reading test results for their age. 

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  • Last year's Reading Recovery awards ceremony

Video

Reading Recovery Awards 2016

Watch the Reading Recovery awards ceremony video.

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