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Showing 6 Projects from The Octagon:
Disrupters and Innovators
About Disrupters and Innovators
Discover more about Disrupters and Innovators, UCL's exhibition dedicated to remarkable women, whose lives and careers were shaped by what they learnt, taught and researched at UCL.The exhibition is presented in two parts: a prologue called The Magic Fruit Garden, and Disrupters and Innovators, which features a number of women with connections to the university.The stories in this exhibition reflect the long struggle for democracy in the UK and for gender equality in higher education. They provide insights into educational reform, advancements in science and art and social and political change in the world in which these women lived.Some women were rewarded with professional recognition and personal accolades for their contributions to their discipline, culture and social reform. Others, despite equally significant contributions, received much less attention and reward. It falls to later generations to uncover their achievements and restore their reputations. Find our more about these women here.[[{"fid":"8519","view_mode":"large","fields":{"height":"1510","width":"2347","class":"media-element file-large","format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Record card Aimee Nimr","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EStudent%20registry%20card%20for%20Slade%20student%2C%20Aimee%20Nimr%20(1907-1974).%20After%20graduating%2C%20Nimr%20became%20a%20driving%20force%20in%20the%20Art%20and%20Liberty%20Group%20founded%20in%201930s%20Cairo.%20Its%20members%20%26ndash%3B%20Surrealist%20artists%2C%20poets%20and%20writers%20%26ndash%3B%20aspired%20to%20connect%20art%20with%20social%20issues%2C%20particularly%20the%20impact%20of%20World%20War%20II%20on%20Egypt.%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"height":"1510","width":"2347","class":"media-element file-large","format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Record card Aimee Nimr","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EStudent%20registry%20card%20for%20Slade%20student%2C%20Aimee%20Nimr%20(1907-1974).%20After%20graduating%2C%20Nimr%20became%20a%20driving%20force%20in%20the%20Art%20and%20Liberty%20Group%20founded%20in%201930s%20Cairo.%20Its%20members%20%26ndash%3B%20Surrealist%20artists%2C%20poets%20and%20writers%20%26ndash%3B%20aspired%20to%20connect%20art%20with%20social%20issues%2C%20particularly%20the%20impact%20of%20World%20War%20II%20on%20Egypt.%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"1510","width":"2347","class":"media-element file-large"}}]]Exploring new disciplinesDisrupters and Innovators is displayed across four cases in UCL's Octagon Gallery. In the second part of the exhibition, each case addresses a different area of academic study: Archaeology, Art, Science, and Politics and Society. Visitors can explore how women pioneered new disciplines and their often interdisciplinary approaches.ArchaeologyArchaeology was a new science at the end of the 19th century. The study of Egypt – Egyptology – was on the edge of this new science. It did not require the same formal qualifications, such as knowing Latin and Greek, demanded by more established subjects. As women were less likely to have these qualifications, Egyptology was easier for them to enter.The attitude of the first UCL Professor of Egyptology, Flinders Petrie, was crucial to women’s advancement in this subject. Petrie helped to transform archaeology from treasure-hunting to a scientific discipline, and his collection is held at the UCL museum established in his name. Petrie's own career was made possible by the generosity and support of women, particularly his benefactor Amelia Edwards and his protégé Margaret Murray, who is featured below.Murray enabled Petrie to make long trips to Egypt to carry out excavations, as she taught most of UCL's Egyptology classes. Her high profile as a scholar, teacher and advocate for women’s rights in turn contributed to the subject’s popularity with women. In 1907, Manchester University Museum received a rare collection of two mummies, complete with the contents of their tomb, and Murray worked to catalogue the objects. A year later she took part in the public unwrapping of one of the mummies to an audience of 500 with extensive media coverage.[[{"fid":"8467","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Margaret Murray, mummy unwrapping","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EMargaret%20Murray%20and%20team%20unwrapping%20the%20mummies%20of%20the%20%26lsquo%3BTwo%20Brothers%26rsquo%3B%20at%20Manchester%20University%20Museum%20in%201908.%20%26copy%3B%20Courtesy%20of%20Manchester%20Museum%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Margaret Murray, mummy unwrapping","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EMargaret%20Murray%20and%20team%20unwrapping%20the%20mummies%20of%20the%20%26lsquo%3BTwo%20Brothers%26rsquo%3B%20at%20Manchester%20University%20Museum%20in%201908.%20%26copy%3B%20Courtesy%20of%20Manchester%20Museum%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"1772","width":"2490","class":"media-element file-large"}}]]“The shelf is not a comfortable place and I have no desire to be on it...I look forward to working till the last."Egyptologist Margaret Murray aged 100, autobiography, 1963ArtThe Slade School of Fine Art was founded in 1871. Teaching was grounded in the study of the human figure, setting the Slade apart from other schools. The admission of women to study alongside men formed another radical departure from established models. The Royal Academy followed suit nearly twenty years later, with other disciplines at UCL even slower to adopt a co-education approach: medicine was the latest in 1917-18.The Slade influenced women’s integration into wider College life and society, and many Slade women worked across disciplines or were involved in socio-political reform. Female students quickly outnumbered male ones at the Slade and their achievements were recognised by prizes. While 45% of the artists in the Slade Collection are women, many including Clara Klinghoffer (featured below), Winifred Knights and Aimee (Amy) Nimr in the exhibition, remain largely unknown today.Clara Klinghoffer (1900-1970) was an Austrian Jewish émigré who enrolled at the Slade in 1918. A year later, she won second prize for Figure Drawing and received the Orpen Bursary for students who ‘intend to become Professional Artists’. Promoted by influential artists such as Sir Jacob Epstein and Alfred Wolmark, she presented her first critically acclaimed exhibition in 1919. Reviewers compared her to the grand master of Italian Renaissance, Raphael. Journeys of early 20th-century women artists like Klinghoffer are explored in the UCL Art Museum's 2018 exhibition Prize & Prejudice. [[{"fid":"8531","view_mode":"medium","fields":{"format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Clara Klinghoffer © The artist's estate","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cdiv%3E%3Cp%3EClara%20Klinghoffer%2C%20%3Cem%3EFive%20Studies%20of%20a%20Female%20Nude%2C%3C%2Fem%3E%20c.1918-1919%2C%20pencil.%20UCL%20Art%20Museum%206075%26nbsp%3B%26copy%3B%20The%20artist%26%2339%3Bs%20estate%3C%2Fp%3E%3C%2Fdiv%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Clara Klinghoffer © The artist's estate","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cdiv%3E%3Cp%3EClara%20Klinghoffer%2C%20%3Cem%3EFive%20Studies%20of%20a%20Female%20Nude%2C%3C%2Fem%3E%20c.1918-1919%2C%20pencil.%20UCL%20Art%20Museum%206075%26nbsp%3B%26copy%3B%20The%20artist%26%2339%3Bs%20estate%3C%2Fp%3E%3C%2Fdiv%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"800","width":"504","class":"media-element file-medium"}}]]“Girl Who Draws Like Raphael - Success at 19"—Review of artist Clara Klinghoffer’s exhibition in The Daily Graphic, 1919Politics and SocietyWomen’s and workers’ rights, prison reform, education and Irish independence were key social and political concerns of the early 20th century. Women working across the sciences and humanities at UCL became forces for change in these areas, often alongside significant contributions in their own disciplines.Constance Markievicz (née Gore-Booth) was the first woman elected to the British House of Commons in 1918. She became an MP for a Dublin constituency while in prison, along with many Sinn Féin MPs who were political prisoners at this time. As with other Sinn Féin MPs, then and now, Markievicz did not take her seat in Parliament.Markievicz previously studied at the Slade School of Art and she became increasingly involved in the suffrage cause during this time. Despite her aristocratic background and marriage to a Polish count, she felt passionately about art and workers’ rights throughout her life. She was imprisoned and sentenced to death for her part in the 1916 Easter Rising against British rule, but was later released under a general amnesty.[[{"fid":"8543","view_mode":"medium","fields":{"height":"5688","width":"3960","class":"media-element file-medium","format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Constance Markievicz","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cdiv%3E%3Cp%3EDigital%20reproduction%20of%20studio%20portrait%20of%20Countess%20Constance%20Markievicz%2C%20Keogh%20Brothers%20Ltd%2C%20c.1910-1927%20NPA%20POLF206%20%26copy%3B%20National%20Library%20of%20Ireland%3C%2Fp%3E%3C%2Fdiv%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"height":"5688","width":"3960","class":"media-element file-medium","format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Constance Markievicz","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cdiv%3E%3Cp%3EDigital%20reproduction%20of%20studio%20portrait%20of%20Countess%20Constance%20Markievicz%2C%20Keogh%20Brothers%20Ltd%2C%20c.1910-1927%20NPA%20POLF206%20%26copy%3B%20National%20Library%20of%20Ireland%3C%2Fp%3E%3C%2Fdiv%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"5688","width":"3960","class":"media-element file-medium"}}]]“...When I urged that the women’s suffrage movement had gone too far to be stopped he disagreed."—Reformer Isabel Fry reflecting on a conversation with retired Judge Bacon, known for his anti-feminist views, 1911Sciencey the 1990s, the scientific community had started to uncover the missing histories of women scientists. Disciplines such as botany and geology had long traditions of amateur contributors, often women, alongside professionals. The uncertain career paths offered in emerging scientific disciplines were often less attractive to men, and new disciplines often had less defined entry paths, or involved applied research that carried less academic prestige. These circumstances all provided opportunities for women to further develop research and careers.Dame Kathleen Lonsdale (née Yardley) (1903-1971) is pictured below. She was one of the first two women to become a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1945, and the following year she founded a research group in Crystallography at UCL. In 1949, Lonsdale became the university's first female professor and she received both the Royal Society’s Davy Medal and a DBE in under a decade.During her lifetime, Lonsdale worked with influential professors such as William Bragg and Christopher Ingold. Nobel Prize winners Bragg and his son Lawrence pioneered the use of X-rays to determine crystal structures, and Lonsdale applied this technique to the petrochemical benzene, confirming its long-disputed structure. As a scientist she worked at many institutions but UCL was her first, last and longest. UCL marked her legacy by naming a university building in her honour, the only building to be named after a women. The refurbished Kathleen Lonsdale Building is located on UCL’s main Bloomsbury campus.[[{"fid":"8471","view_mode":"large","fields":{"height":"1308","width":"1772","class":"media-element file-small","format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Kathleen Lonsdale with crystal models","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EKathleen%20Lonsdale%20with%20crystal%20models%2C%20photographer%20unknown%2C%20c.1946.%20Courtesy%20of%20Professor%20Ian%20Wood%2C%20UCL%20Earth%20Sciences%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"height":"1308","width":"1772","class":"media-element file-small","format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Kathleen Lonsdale with crystal models","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EKathleen%20Lonsdale%20with%20crystal%20models%2C%20photographer%20unknown%2C%20c.1946.%20Courtesy%20of%20Professor%20Ian%20Wood%2C%20UCL%20Earth%20Sciences%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"1308","width":"1772","class":"media-element file-large"}}]]“...questioning of the established order is the hallmark of the true scientific outlook..."—Crystallographer Dame Kathleen Lonsdale, The Melbourne Herald, 1966Behind the exhibitionDisrupters and Innovators is part of Vote 100 at UCL in 2018. Find out more about the background to this exhibition below:The history of women at UCLThis exhibition is part of UCL's year-long Vote 100 programme, which marks the centenary of the Representation of the People Act that granted the vote to some women over the age of 30 in the UK.Beginning in the 1860s, UCL experimented with providing classes for women. From 1878, women could study alongside men and receive University of London degrees: the first time this had happened in the UK. It was not until 1918 that new legislation allowed the first women to vote in the UK. This was part of wider electoral reforms accelerated by World War I. Ten years later, women received equal voting rights with men. This process was a backdrop to the lives of female students and researchers at UCL and beyond in the early 20th century. However, co-education was not adopted in all subjects and female students and staff continued to face many obstacles.The UCL Vote 100 programme reveals the impact of the pioneering women who built the university, and imaginatively explore the battles still to be won. Find out more about UCL Vote 100 here.Working across UCLThis UCL Culture exhibition is curated by Dr Nina Pearlman, Head of UCL Art Collections,who also produced this interpretation text.Exhibition produced in association with:Maria Blyzinsky, Museum Consultant, The Exhibitions TeamVictoria Kingston, Interpretation Consultant, The Exhibitions TeamAngela Scott, Senior Graphic Designer, UCL Digital MediaDave Bellamy, Display Technician, Chiltern ExhibitionsUCL Culture would like to thank the following people for their support with the exhibition:Society: David Blackmore (UCL Slade School of Fine Art), Dr Georgina Brewis (UCL Institute of Education), Dr Claire Robins (UCL Institute of Education)Archaeology: Dr Emma Libonati (UCL Petrie Museum)Art: Helen Downes (UCL Art Museum), Grace Hailstone (UCL Slade School of Fine Art)Science: Deborah Furness (UCL Library Services), Lesley Hall (Wellcome Library), Dr Jenny Wilson (UCL Science & Technology Studies), Professor Ian Wood (UCL Earth Sciences)Thanks are extended also to:UCL Art Museum, Grant Museum of Zoology, Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UCL Geology Collection, UCL Pathology Collection, UCL Institute of Education Archives, UCL Library Services, UCL Records, UCL Special Collections UCL Special Collections, and UCL Slade School of Fine Art for their generous loans. 
amended_octagon.jpg
Cabinets of Consequence
The Cabinets of Consequence is an exhibition that explores the interplay between human, environmental and technological activity by drawing on current UCL research in Geology, Neuroscience, Literature, Computer Science and Archaeology.The exhibition examines the following key themes: Agriculture-AnimalsThe scale of current ecological change is often difficult to perceive. Non-humans including animals and insects can be overlooked in their significance and impact upon the Earth’s eco-system.  This part of the exhibition looks at the interplay between natural history and animal worlds. It examines the use of animals in agriculture and farming, and asks: how will food be provided for a growing population of 9 billion people in 2050?Energies-ResourcesThe drive for energy and resources crosses both human and non-human histories. Forms of movement, extraction and displacement of natural resources create a multiplicity of effects. This part of the exhibition showcases the impact of fossil fuel extraction and burning, alongside the entangled military-industrial collisions of war and trade. It asks: when did humans begin to radically alter the Earth and what historical narratives have been created to explain our behaviour?Media-NaturesTechnology is often thought of as a human-centered pursuit and skill. Yet nature has not only inspired the rise of technology, it is materially involved in the production of digital culture. This part of the exhibition focuses on the blurring of technology and the natural world. It reveals the invisible connections that we have come to depend upon and asks: will the technology of today be the fossils of tomorrow?Afterlives-ExtinctionsWith the Earth’s resources dwindling, the possibility of a post-human planet emerges. Our own limits must be confronted in order to contemplate potential scenarios. This part of the exhibition connects the inevitability of finitude and the possible worlds it may bring. It asks: how will we prepare for the future and will our anthropogenic legacies transmit to other beings and planets?Come and visit the Cabinets of Consequence at The Octagon till May 2017.  
Kathleen Lonsdale
Disrupters and Innovators
As part of UCL's Vote 100 programme, the Octagon gallery presents an exhibition exploring the lasting contributions to research, teaching and wider society of female students and staff at UCL a century ago.Disrupters and Innovators, curated by Dr Nina Pearlman, is dedicated to a group of remarkable women whose lives and careers were shaped by what they learnt, taught and researched at UCL. Their perseverance, originality and ingenuity continue to inspire. Echoes of the challenges they faced remain today. The Octagon is a public space at the heart of UCL, directly under its iconic dome. On this page you'll find a selection of images from the forthcoming display that relate to the lives and work of these women in archaeology, art, education, poliics, science and society. Discover more about the exhibitionThis UCL Culture exhibition is curated by Dr Nina Pearlman, Head of UCL Art Collections.Produced in association with:Maria Blyzinsky, Museum Consultant, The Exhibitions TeamVictoria Kingston, Interpretation Consultant, The Exhibitions TeamAngela Scott, Senior Graphic Designer, UCL Digital MediaDave Bellamy, Display Technician, Chiltern ExhibitionsUCL Culture would like to thank the following people for their support with the exhibition:Society: David Blackmore (UCL Slade School of Fine Art), Dr Georgina Brewis (UCL Institute of Education), Dr Claire Robins (UCL Institute of Education)Archaeology: Dr Emma Libonati (UCL Petrie Museum)Art: Helen Downes (UCL Art Museum), Grace Hailstone (UCL Slade School of Fine Art)Science: Deborah Furness (UCL Library Services), Lesley Hall (Wellcome Library), Dr Jenny Wilson (UCL Science & Technology Studies), Professor Ian Wood (UCL Earth Sciences)Thanks are extended also to:UCL Art Museum, Grant Museum of Zoology, Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UCL Geology Collection, UCL Pathology Collection, UCL Institute of Education Archives, UCL Library Services, UCL Records, UCL Special Collections UCL Special Collections, and UCL Slade School of Fine Art for their generous loans.
Disrupters and Innovators
Disrupters and Innovators
Discover more about Disrupters and Innovators, UCL's exhibition dedicated to remarkable women, whose lives and careers were shaped by what they learnt, taught and researched at UCL. Here you'll find more detailed stories of the women featured in the display.The stories in this exhibition reflect the long struggle for democracy in the UK and for gender equality in higher education. They provide insights into educational reform, advancements in science and art and social and political change in the world in which these women lived.Some women were rewarded with professional recognition and personal accolades for their contributions to their discipline, culture and social reform. Others, despite equally significant contributions, received much less attention and reward. It falls to later generations to uncover their achievements and restore their reputations. [[{"fid":"8519","view_mode":"large","fields":{"height":"1510","width":"2347","class":"media-element file-large","format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Record card Aimee Nimr","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EStudent%20registry%20card%20for%20Slade%20student%2C%20Aimee%20Nimr%20(1907-1974).%20After%20graduating%2C%20Nimr%20became%20a%20driving%20force%20in%20the%20Art%20and%20Liberty%20Group%20founded%20in%201930s%20Cairo.%20Its%20members%20%26ndash%3B%20Surrealist%20artists%2C%20poets%20and%20writers%20%26ndash%3B%20aspired%20to%20connect%20art%20with%20social%20issues%2C%20particularly%20the%20impact%20of%20World%20War%20II%20on%20Egypt.%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"height":"1510","width":"2347","class":"media-element file-large","format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Record card Aimee Nimr","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EStudent%20registry%20card%20for%20Slade%20student%2C%20Aimee%20Nimr%20(1907-1974).%20After%20graduating%2C%20Nimr%20became%20a%20driving%20force%20in%20the%20Art%20and%20Liberty%20Group%20founded%20in%201930s%20Cairo.%20Its%20members%20%26ndash%3B%20Surrealist%20artists%2C%20poets%20and%20writers%20%26ndash%3B%20aspired%20to%20connect%20art%20with%20social%20issues%2C%20particularly%20the%20impact%20of%20World%20War%20II%20on%20Egypt.%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"1510","width":"2347","class":"media-element file-large"}}]]Exploring new disciplinesDisrupters and Innovators is displayed across four cases in UCL's Octagon Gallery. Each case addresses a different area of academic study: Archaeology, Art, Science, and Politics and Society. Visitors can explore how women pioneered new disciplines and their often interdisciplinary approaches.ArchaeologyArchaeology was a new science at the end of the 19th century. The study of Egypt – Egyptology – was on the edge of this new science. It did not require the same formal qualifications, such as knowing Latin and Greek, demanded by more established subjects. As women were less likely to have these qualifications, Egyptology was easier for them to enter.The attitude of the first UCL Professor of Egyptology, Flinders Petrie, was crucial to women’s advancement in this subject. Petrie helped to transform archaeology from treasure-hunting to a scientific discipline, and his collection is held at the UCL museum established in his name. Petrie's own career was made possible by the generosity and support of women, particularly his benefactor Amelia Edwards and his protégé Margaret Murray, who is featured below.Murray enabled Petrie to make long trips to Egypt to carry out excavations, as she taught most of UCL's Egyptology classes. Her high profile as a scholar, teacher and advocate for women’s rights in turn contributed to the subject’s popularity with women. In 1907, Manchester University Museum received a rare collection of two mummies, complete with the contents of their tomb, and Murray worked to catalogue the objects. A year later she took part in the public unwrapping of one of the mummies to an audience of 500 with extensive media coverage.[[{"fid":"8467","view_mode":"large","fields":{"format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Margaret Murray, mummy unwrapping","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EMargaret%20Murray%20and%20team%20unwrapping%20the%20mummies%20of%20the%20%26lsquo%3BTwo%20Brothers%26rsquo%3B%20at%20Manchester%20University%20Museum%20in%201908.%20%26copy%3B%20Courtesy%20of%20Manchester%20Museum%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Margaret Murray, mummy unwrapping","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EMargaret%20Murray%20and%20team%20unwrapping%20the%20mummies%20of%20the%20%26lsquo%3BTwo%20Brothers%26rsquo%3B%20at%20Manchester%20University%20Museum%20in%201908.%20%26copy%3B%20Courtesy%20of%20Manchester%20Museum%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"1772","width":"2490","class":"media-element file-large"}}]]“The shelf is not a comfortable place and I have no desire to be on it...I look forward to working till the last."Egyptologist Margaret Murray aged 100, autobiography, 1963ArtThe Slade School of Fine Art was founded in 1871. Teaching was grounded in the study of the human figure, setting the Slade apart from other schools. The admission of women to study alongside men formed another radical departure from established models. The Royal Academy followed suit nearly twenty years later, with other disciplines at UCL even slower to adopt a co-education approach: medicine was the latest in 1917-18.The Slade influenced women’s integration into wider College life and society, and many Slade women worked across disciplines or were involved in socio-political reform. Female students quickly outnumbered male ones at the Slade and their achievements were recognised by prizes. While 45% of the artists in the Slade Collection are women, many including Clara Klinghoffer (featured below), Winifred Knights and Aimee (Amy) Nimr in the exhibition, remain largely unknown today.Clara Klinghoffer (1900-1970) was an Austrian Jewish émigré who enrolled at the Slade in 1918. A year later, she won second prize for Figure Drawing and received the Orpen Bursary for students who ‘intend to become Professional Artists’. Promoted by influential artists such as Sir Jacob Epstein and Alfred Wolmark, she presented her first critically acclaimed exhibition in 1919. Reviewers compared her to the grand master of Italian Renaissance, Raphael. Journeys of early 20th-century women artists like Klinghoffer are explored in the UCL Art Museum's 2018 exhibition Prize & Prejudice. [[{"fid":"8531","view_mode":"medium","fields":{"format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Clara Klinghoffer © The artist's estate","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cdiv%3E%3Cp%3EClara%20Klinghoffer%2C%20%3Cem%3EFive%20Studies%20of%20a%20Female%20Nude%2C%3C%2Fem%3E%20c.1918-1919%2C%20pencil.%20UCL%20Art%20Museum%206075%26nbsp%3B%26copy%3B%20The%20artist%26%2339%3Bs%20estate%3C%2Fp%3E%3C%2Fdiv%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Clara Klinghoffer © The artist's estate","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cdiv%3E%3Cp%3EClara%20Klinghoffer%2C%20%3Cem%3EFive%20Studies%20of%20a%20Female%20Nude%2C%3C%2Fem%3E%20c.1918-1919%2C%20pencil.%20UCL%20Art%20Museum%206075%26nbsp%3B%26copy%3B%20The%20artist%26%2339%3Bs%20estate%3C%2Fp%3E%3C%2Fdiv%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"800","width":"504","class":"media-element file-medium"}}]]“Girl Who Draws Like Raphael - Success at 19"—Review of artist Clara Klinghoffer’s exhibition in The Daily Graphic, 1919Politics and SocietyWomen’s and workers’ rights, prison reform, education and Irish independence were key social and political concerns of the early 20th century. Women working across the sciences and humanities at UCL became forces for change in these areas, often alongside significant contributions in their own disciplines.Constance Markievicz (née Gore-Booth) was the first woman elected to the British House of Commons in 1918. She became an MP for a Dublin constituency while in prison, along with many Sinn Féin MPs who were political prisoners at this time. As with other Sinn Féin MPs, then and now, Markievicz did not take her seat in Parliament.Markievicz previously studied at the Slade School of Art and she became increasingly involved in the suffrage cause during this time. Despite her aristocratic background and marriage to a Polish count, she felt passionately about art and workers’ rights throughout her life. She was imprisoned and sentenced to death for her part in the 1916 Easter Rising against British rule, but was later released under a general amnesty.[[{"fid":"8543","view_mode":"medium","fields":{"height":"5688","width":"3960","class":"media-element file-medium","format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Constance Markievicz","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cdiv%3E%3Cp%3EDigital%20reproduction%20of%20studio%20portrait%20of%20Countess%20Constance%20Markievicz%2C%20Keogh%20Brothers%20Ltd%2C%20c.1910-1927%20NPA%20POLF206%20%26copy%3B%20National%20Library%20of%20Ireland%3C%2Fp%3E%3C%2Fdiv%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"height":"5688","width":"3960","class":"media-element file-medium","format":"medium","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Constance Markievicz","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cdiv%3E%3Cp%3EDigital%20reproduction%20of%20studio%20portrait%20of%20Countess%20Constance%20Markievicz%2C%20Keogh%20Brothers%20Ltd%2C%20c.1910-1927%20NPA%20POLF206%20%26copy%3B%20National%20Library%20of%20Ireland%3C%2Fp%3E%3C%2Fdiv%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"5688","width":"3960","class":"media-element file-medium"}}]]“...When I urged that the women’s suffrage movement had gone too far to be stopped he disagreed."—Reformer Isabel Fry reflecting on a conversation with retired Judge Bacon, known for his anti-feminist views, 1911Sciencey the 1990s, the scientific community had started to uncover the missing histories of women scientists. Disciplines such as botany and geology had long traditions of amateur contributors, often women, alongside professionals. The uncertain career paths offered in emerging scientific disciplines were often less attractive to men, and new disciplines often had less defined entry paths, or involved applied research that carried less academic prestige. These circumstances all provided opportunities for women to further develop research and careers.Dame Kathleen Lonsdale (née Yardley) (1903-1971) is pictured below. She was one of the first two women to become a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1945, and the following year she founded a research group in Crystallography at UCL. In 1949, Lonsdale became the university's first female professor and she received both the Royal Society’s Davy Medal and a DBE in under a decade.During her lifetime, Lonsdale worked with influential professors such as William Bragg and Christopher Ingold. Nobel Prize winners Bragg and his son Lawrence pioneered the use of X-rays to determine crystal structures, and Lonsdale applied this technique to the petrochemical benzene, confirming its long-disputed structure. As a scientist she worked at many institutions but UCL was her first, last and longest. UCL marked her legacy by naming a university building in her honour, the only building to be named after a women. The refurbished Kathleen Lonsdale Building is located on UCL’s main Bloomsbury campus.[[{"fid":"8471","view_mode":"large","fields":{"height":"1308","width":"1772","class":"media-element file-small","format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Kathleen Lonsdale with crystal models","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EKathleen%20Lonsdale%20with%20crystal%20models%2C%20photographer%20unknown%2C%20c.1946.%20Courtesy%20of%20Professor%20Ian%20Wood%2C%20UCL%20Earth%20Sciences%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"height":"1308","width":"1772","class":"media-element file-small","format":"large","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Kathleen Lonsdale with crystal models","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"%3Cp%3EKathleen%20Lonsdale%20with%20crystal%20models%2C%20photographer%20unknown%2C%20c.1946.%20Courtesy%20of%20Professor%20Ian%20Wood%2C%20UCL%20Earth%20Sciences%3C%2Fp%3E","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"1308","width":"1772","class":"media-element file-large"}}]]“...questioning of the established order is the hallmark of the true scientific outlook..."—Crystallographer Dame Kathleen Lonsdale, The Melbourne Herald, 1966 The history of women at UCLThis exhibition is part of UCL's year-long Vote 100 programme, which marks the centenary of the Representation of the People Act that granted the vote to some women over the age of 30 in the UK.Beginning in the 1860s, UCL experimented with providing classes for women. From 1878, women could study alongside men and receive University of London degrees: the first time this had happened in the UK. It was not until 1918 that new legislation allowed the first women to vote in the UK. This was part of wider electoral reforms accelerated by World War I. Ten years later, women received equal voting rights with men. This process was a backdrop to the lives of female students and researchers at UCL and beyond in the early 20th century. However, co-education was not adopted in all subjects and female students and staff continued to face many obstacles.The UCL Vote 100 programme reveals the impact of the pioneering women who built the university, and imaginatively explore the battles still to be won. Find out more about UCL Vote 100 here. This UCL Culture exhibition is curated by Dr Nina Pearlman Manager of UCL Art Museum who also produced this interpretation text. Exhibition produced in association with:Maria Blyzinsky, Museum Consultant, The Exhibitions TeamVictoria Kingston, Interpretation Consultant, The Exhibitions TeamAngela Scott, Senior Graphic Designer, UCL Digital MediaDave Bellamy, Display Technician, Chiltern ExhibitionsUCL Culture would like to thank the following people for their support with the exhibition:Society: David Blackmore (UCL Slade School of Fine Art), Dr Georgina Brewis (UCL Institute of Education), Dr Claire Robins (UCL Institute of Education)Archaeology: Dr Emma Libonati (UCL Petrie Museum)Art: Helen Downes (UCL Art Museum), Grace Hailstone (UCL Slade School of Fine Art)Science: Deborah Furness (UCL Library Services), Lesley Hall (Wellcome Library), Dr Jenny Wilson (UCL Science & Technology Studies), Professor Ian Wood (UCL Earth Sciences)Thanks are extended also to:UCL Art Museum, Grant Museum of Zoology, Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UCL Geology Collection, UCL Pathology Collection, UCL Institute of Education Archives, UCL Library Services, UCL Records, UCL Special Collections UCL Special Collections, and UCL Slade School of Fine Art for their generous loans. 
Illustration of a tree outlined on a grey background. Orange fruit are falling on the ground
The Magic Fruit Garden
A prologue to UCL's Disrupters and Innovators exhibition in the Octagon Gallery.This preview exhibition focused on an illustrated book by Marion Wallace-Dunlop (1864-1942), who studied at UCL. Take a closer look at her book called The Magic Fruit Garden.[[{"fid":"8847","view_mode":"xl","fields":{"height":"3937","width":"7673","class":"media-element file-large","format":"xl","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Illustration of a tree outlined on a grey background. Orange fruit are falling on the ground. Text reads: 'Now I wonder what will come next'","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Magic Fruit Garden","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"link_text":null,"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"height":"3937","width":"7673","class":"media-element file-large","format":"xl","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Illustration of a tree outlined on a grey background. Orange fruit are falling on the ground. Text reads: 'Now I wonder what will come next'","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Magic Fruit Garden","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"none","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"attributes":{"height":"3937","width":"7673","class":"media-element file-xl"}}]]Wallace-Dunlop was an artist, writer and lifelong campaigner for women’s rights. In 1909, she became the first suffragette to go on hunger strike, having been imprisoned for stencilling political graffiti on a wall in the House of Commons. Two decades earlier, she created a fairy tale about a girl struggling to write an essay on ‘Perseverance’.  In her quest for wisdom, Doc finds a magic fruit garden where knowledge-fruit grows on bushes and trees. Here she picks ‘geography-plums and history-apples and grammar-pears and all the time her knowledge of everything kept growing bigger and bigger’. In a glass conservatory, Doc encounters piles of sweets ‘made from mixtures of the various fruits in the garden boiled in a syrup called Research. There was botany-sugar, zoology-candy, geology-toffee, and sugar-plums of every kind and colour’.When she gets home, her brother tells Doc it was only a dream and remarks that it’s ‘just like a girl to think that a dream is real.’ However, he then embarks on an adventure of his own which forces him to admit the magic garden is real.Behind the exhibitionThe Magic Fruit Garden is part of Vote 100 at UCL in 2018. Find out more about the background to this exhibition below:The history of women at UCLThis exhibition is part of UCL's year-long Vote 100 programme, which marks the centenary of the Representation of the People Act that granted the vote to some women over the age of 30 in the UK.Beginning in the 1860s, UCL experimented with providing classes for women. From 1878, women could study alongside men and receive University of London degrees: the first time this had happened in the UK. It was not until 1918 that new legislation allowed the first women to vote in the UK. This was part of wider electoral reforms accelerated by World War I. Ten years later, women received equal voting rights with men. This process was a backdrop to the lives of female students and researchers at UCL and beyond in the early 20th century. However, co-education was not adopted in all subjects and female students and staff continued to face many obstacles.The UCL Vote 100 programme reveals the impact of the pioneering women who built the university, and imaginatively explore the battles still to be won. Find out more about UCL Vote 100 here.Working across UCLThis UCL Culture exhibition is curated by Dr Nina Pearlman, Head of UCL Art Collections, who also managed the design concept.Produced in association with:Design realisation: Angela Scott, UCL Digital MediaProduction: Darren Stevens and Sam Wilkinson, UCL CultureQuotes featured in the exhibition are from Marion Wallace-Dunlop, The Magic Fruit Garden (London: Ernest Nister, 1889)  
Bentham's ring
What Does It Mean To Be Human?
The severed heads of two famous scholars have spent the last few decades hidden from public view. Both were men strongly associated with UCL that consented to have their remains preserved for future generations to display, research and discuss. Here we exhibit the head of philosopher Jeremy Bentham for the first time in decades, alongside cutting-edge scientific techniques to extract and sequence his DNA. We also consider why the archaeologist Flinders Petrie left his head to science, and explore how the actions and work of both men have influenced our modern attitudes to death and what it means to be human.By looking at Flinders Petrie’s and Jeremy Bentham’s heads in the context of their own scholarship, alongside current scientific advances and other human remains from UCL's collections, 'What does it mean to be human?'  Examines the power of human remains to generate debate and critical reflection. Come and explore these issues in archaeology, history and philosophy of science, evolutionary science and ancient DNA research in this exhibition and accompanying events series.EventsWhat does it mean to be human? Through talks, workshops and a late opening discover how we use science to understand the dilemma of death. The Head of Flinders Petrie?Wednesday 6 September, 1.15-1.45pmTalkPetrie Museum of Egyptian ArchaeologyFind out more about the so-called head of Flinders Petrie that is stored in a jar in the Royal College of Surgeons. Elizabeth Jones (UCL STS) explains why it is there and the questions to science that it poses.  Death DrawingFriday 27 October 6-8pmWorkshopGrant Museum of ZoologyBe inspired by the heads and art works depicting heads on display in our exhibition, A Study of What it means to be Human?, as well as objects in the Grant Museum of Zoology to draw from death with artist Lucy Lyons. Includes an afterhours visit to the exhibition.Fake News: The Heads of Jeremy Bentham and Flinders PetrieWednesday 22 November 1.10 – 1.50pmTalkOctagon Gallery Everyone knows that the philosopher Jeremy Bentham’s head was used as a football. We all know that the widow of the Egyptian archaeologist Flinders Petrie brought Petrie’s head to England in her hatbox. Yet neither of these stories is true! Find out more about how such myths are made and how this exhibition is debunking these and other ‘fake news’. Unexpected Utility: Sequencing the Genome of Jeremy BenthamWednesday 11 October 1.15-1.45pmTalkOctagonThis talk explores what ancient DNA is and how an attempt was made to sequence the genome of the philosopher Jeremy Bentham. Lucy van Dorp will explain why we bother to analyse ancient DNA and present examples of how such analysis has had an impact on modern understanding of diseases and human activity. Lost Skills: Will WritingTuesday 21 November 1.10 – 1.50pmWorkshopPetrie Museum of Egyptian ArchaeologyHow do you write a will? How do you make it legally binding? Be inspired by a 3,000-year-old example preserved on papyrus from Ancient Egypt to write your own will. Discover how philosopher Jeremy Bentham’s will had an impact on modern ideas about death. Find out more about these historic examples and get advice on will writing.Curating Heads: Museum Studies Round TableWednesday 22 November 4-5.30pmDiscussionInstitute of ArchaeologyChaired by Dr Alice Stevenson (UCl IoA) a panel of museum professionals who’ve curated human remains and material culture around death and dying give provocations for discussion. A Wake for Jeremy Bentham: What Jeremy did for Death and the Living15 February 6-9pmLate openingSouth Cloisters, Wilkins Building Join us to celebrate Jeremy Bentham’s 270th birthday while his head is on display in the Octagon gallery and to bid adieu to his auto-icon as it goes to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. At this long-table style event a series of speakers will make a 5-10 minute ‘toast’ to Jeremy Bentham that explores how his decision for his body to become an auto-icon had an impact on how death and the dead body is perceived as well as people living. [[{"fid":"5863","view_mode":"small","fields":{"format":"small","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Star shaped logo for UCL Grand Challenges","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"left","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"small","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Star shaped logo for UCL Grand Challenges","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][title]":"","field_caption_heading[und][0][url]":"","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"limited_html","field_float_left_right[und]":"left","field_file_image_decorative[und]":"0"}},"link_text":null,"attributes":{"height":"1943","width":"2244","class":"media-element file-small"}}]]UCL Grand Challenges funded the extraction and genome sequencing of DNA from the remains of Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832) with a view to a wider programme of research on the history, legacy, ethics and practices of researching, exhibiting and curating human remains. The plan was also to extract DNA from the head thought to be of the UCL archaeologist Sir Flinders Petrie (1853-1942) in the Royal College of Surgeons but due to issues with family consent, we have not been able to do this. However, we still consider why Petrie left his head to science.