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Poxvirus hijacks cell movement to spread infection

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Tracks of infected cells

Vaccinia virus, a poxvirus closely related to smallpox and monkeypox, tricks cells it has infected into activating their own cell movement mechanism to rapidly spread the virus in cells and mice, according to a new UCL-led study.

New cell movement process key to understanding and repairing facial malformations

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facial_malformation_cells

The embryonic stem cells that form facial features, called neural crest cells, use an unexpected mechanism of moving from the back of the head to the front to populate the face, finds a new UCL-led study.

How drug resistant TB evolved and spread globally

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TB

The most common form of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) originated in Europe and spread to Asia, Africa and the Americas with European explorers and colonialists, reveals a new study led by UCL and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.

Unexpected role of enzyme may help develop anti-cancer drugs

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171018-drug-target

A newly discovered role for the enzyme glutamine synthetase could have important implications for developing anti-cancer drugs according to a new UCL study.

Small-brained female guppies aren’t drawn to attractive males

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Guppies

Female guppies with smaller brains can distinguish attractive males, but they don’t recognise them as being more appealing or choose to mate with them, according to a new study by UCL and Stockholm University researchers.

Built-in sound amplifier helps male mosquitoes find females

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Yellow fever mosquito

The ears of male mosquitoes amplify the sound of an approaching female using a self-generated phantom tone that mimics the female’s wingbeats, which increases the ear’s acoustic input by a factor of up to 45,000, finds a new UCL-led study.

Land-based bird populations are at risk of local extinction

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to use cape spurfowl

Land-based bird populations are becoming confined to nature reserves in some parts of the world - raising the risk of global extinction - due to the loss of suitable habitat, according to a report led by UCL.

Why do we love bees but hate wasps?

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Wasps suffer a poor public image

A lack of understanding of the important role of wasps in the ecosystem and economy is a fundamental reason why they are universally despised whereas bees are much loved, according to UCL-led research.

Some patients not receiving ADHD treatment, despite overall increase 

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Some patients still not receiving ADHD treatment

Medication use to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has significantly increased across the world, however prescription rates are still far below diagnosis rates in most Western countries, a major new study co-led by UCL has found. 

Help survey wasps over the bank holiday weekend

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wasp 2

Wasps might not be the nation’s favourite insects but are some of the most important so UCL and University of Gloucestershire scientists are again asking for the public’s help to find out more about these misunderstood creatures.

Genes drive ageing, making normal processes damaging

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worm

Ageing in worms mainly results from the direct action of genes and not from random wear and tear or loss of function, and the same is likely to be true in humans, according to research by UCL, Lancaster University and Queen Mary University of London scientists.

Population declines of mammals and birds linked to rapid warming of climate

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black-tailed godwit

The rate at which our planet is warming has been found to be a critical factor in explaining the decline of bird and mammal species, reveals new research by UCL and ZSL (Zoological Society of London). 

Professor Lewis Wolpert recognised with Royal Society Medal

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Professor Lewis Wolpert

Lewis Wolpert CBE FRS, Emeritus Professor of Biology as applied to Medicine (UCL Cell & Developmental Biology), has been awarded the Royal Medal by the Royal Society, in recognition of his contribution to the advancement of biological sciences.

Fetal gene therapy prevents fatal neurodegenerative disease

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vector

A fatal neurodegenerative condition known as Gaucher disease can be prevented in mice following fetal gene therapy, finds a new study led by UCL, the KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital and National University Health System in Singapore.

Our fractured African roots

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African diversity

Our African ancestors were diverse in form and culture, and scattered across the entire continent, finds a team led by UCL, the University of Oxford and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.

UCL celebrates 70 years of working with the NHS

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Caroline Moore NHS

To celebrate 70 years of the National Health Service, researchers and clinicians from across UCL have spoken about what the NHS means to them and how their work impacts the nation’s health.    

New gibbon genus discovered in ancient Chinese tomb

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Gibbon

Bones of an entirely new but already extinct genus of gibbon have been discovered in China, revealing the magnitude of human-caused extinction of primates, according to a study by UCL and ZSL (Zoological Society of London).

Climate change to overtake land use as major threat to global biodiversity

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Gecko

Climate change will have a rapidly increasing effect on the structure of global ecological communities over the next few decades, with amphibians and reptiles being significantly more affected than birds and mammals, a new report by UCL finds.

Genome sequencing reveals origin of killer fungus behind the ‘amphibian plague’

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Borientalis

A deadly fungus responsible for the devastation of amphibian populations around the world has spread from East Asia, according to new research led by scientists at UCL, Imperial College London and Zoological Society of London.

Gene may have helped humans adapt to cold climates

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Finland

A gene variant common in Europeans may have proliferated because it helped early humans adapt to cold weather, according to UCL research.

Six UCL scientists elected Fellows of the Royal Society

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Royal Society Fellows 2018

Six scientists from the UCL community have been elected as Fellows of the Royal Society in recognition of their outstanding contributions to research and innovation that benefit humanity.

Artificial muscles promise to speed up testing of treatments for muscle diseases

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visualisation muscle

Artificial muscles grown from human stem cells could pave the way forward for treating muscle diseases, according to new research led by UCL.

Microbes are savvy when contributing to the common good

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slime mould

Microbes vary their contribution to a community to maximise the return on their investment according to a new study led by UCL and the University of Bath.

How does dietary restriction extend lifespan in flies?

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Drosophila fly

Lifespan in flies is extended by limiting the activity of a group of proteins called GATA transcription factors (TFs), giving clues to how a moderate reduction in food intake protects against multiple ageing-related diseases, according to a new UCL-led study.

Drug-resistant gene goes from pig farms to patients worldwide

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mcr-1 distribution map

A troublesome gene that is resistant to an antibiotic often used as a last resort has been tracked from its origins to hospital patients worldwide in a new study led by UCL and Peking University People’s Hospital.

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