UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES)


SSEES Lightwell


UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES)

The UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) is the world’s leading institution for research and teaching on Russia, the Baltics, and Central, Eastern and South-East Europe. The School’s mission is to foster cross-disciplinary approaches to area studies, using expertise in our primary geographical region to generate knowledge and understanding of the broader world. Our work is organized into four interrelated programmes: Economics and Business; History; Languages and Culture; Politics and Sociology. With our spectacular library and award-winning building in the heart of London, at the centre of a vibrant network of national and international connections, SSEES provides a unique and dynamic environment where students acquire the expertise and skills that employers want, including an unparalleled range of languages.

SSEES also leads the inter-university Centre for East European Language Based Area Studies (CEELBAS), the International Masters in Economy, State, and Society (IMESS), participates in the FP7 network project, ANTICORRP, funds the FRINGE Centre and runs the UCL Mellon Programme.

Prospective Students


Graduate (Taught)

Graduate (Research)


What’s Going On? Body Politics, Abortion and LGBT Rights in Poland

Join us for a lecture by philosopher and gender specialist from the Pedagogical University of Cracow, prof. Marzenna Jakubczak will be followed by the short talk by Marge Berer, the coordinator at the International Campaign for Women's Right to Safe Abortion and interventions from feminist activists and artists, Paulina Poli Palian (activist, Babski Londyn) and Margot Przymierska (artist) and the Polish lecturer dr. Katarzyna Zechenter.The seminar will be chaired by dr. Urszula Chowaniec and the welcome will be with the director of qUCL, dr. Robert Mills

Starts: Oct 27, 2016 6:00:00 PM

The Provisional Government’s Legal Experiment in 1917

While war, economic collapse, and national disintegration pushed Russian politics to the extremes in 1917, the Provisional Government concentrated on legal process and procedure, the essence of law but not revolution. 

Starts: Oct 28, 2016 5:00:00 PM