International Crime Science Conference

Nick Ross Chairing

16 July 2015, British Library, LONDON

This year the 9th International Crime Science Conference will focus on “Science and Security: the application of scientific method to the most pressing crime and security problems of today”. The conference will take place on 16th July 2015 at the British Library in London. The International Crime Science Conference will focus on how techniques, methodologies and technologies from across the physical and social sciences spectrum are being used to tackle some of the most pressing crime and security concerns facing today’s societies. Topics covered will include cyber crime operations; preventing and mitigating extremism; knife and gun crime; advances in sensing for security applications, post-blast explosives detection; money laundering in the Information Age; tackling modern slavery; human trafficking; new approaches in forensic evidence detection and interpretation.

The conference, which has enjoyed consistently high approval ratings from delegates over the past eight years, brings together senior security practitioners, policy-makers, technologists, and academics, all developing the latest techniques and technologies for preventing crime and increasing security. The conference is supported by the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction at the College of Policing.

(Please note: talk/speaker details will be updated here as they are confirmed)

9.30 Welcome

9.40 Opening Plenary

Chair: Professor Gloria Laycock OBE, UCL Security and Crime Science and Director, What Works in Crime Science Reduction Consortium

Speaker TBC

10.40 Coffee and Student Posters

11.00 Parallel Sessions

Auditorium: Preventing, Interdicting and Mitigating Extremism

Chair: Dr Paul Gill, UCL Security and Crime Science

Exploiting Theoretical Frameworks to the Full:  A best practice review of situational approaches for protecting Multi-Modal Passenger Termini from terrorist attack
Professor Paul Ekblom, Central Saint Martins & Professor Alex Hirschfield, University of Huddersfield

Deradicalisation and counter-radicalisaton programmes:  Evidence and lessons from the UK, US and Canada
Dr Amy Thornton, UCL Security and Crime Science

Bronte Room: Illicit Money in the Era of Big data - How has the Information Age changed Money Laundering and what can we do about it?

Chair: Rob Cutler, KPMG

Money Laundering Opportunities and Controls in the Age of the Algorithm
Professor Michael Levi
, Cardiff University

Criminal motivation and money laundering
Richard Lowe, National Crime Agency

Elliot Room: Data-science for Security and Intelligence

Chair: Alex Gibberd, UCL Security and Crime Science

Data Analytics and Sense-Making
Professor Chris Hankin, Imperial College London

Reclaiming the White Elephant
Mike MacIntyre, Panaseer

11.45 Parallel Sessions

Auditorium: What Works in Crime Reduction - Systematic Reviews in youth knife crime, domestic violence and access control

Chair: Professor Gloria Laycock OBE, UCL Security and Crime Science

Gating alleys to reduce crime: A meta-analysis and realist synthesis
Dr Aiden Sidebottom, UCL Security and Crime Science

Mediation, mentoring and peer-support to reduce youth violence: a systematic review Dr Phil Edwards, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Increasing perpetrator motivation to improve the efficacy of interventions for domestic violence:  A review of the research evidence
Carol Vigurs, UCL Institute of Education 

Bronte Room: New approaches in forensic evidence detection and interpretation

Chair: Dr Ruth Morgan, UCL Security and Crime Science

Expressing uncertainty about evidence
Professor David Spiegelhalter, University of Cambridge

Talk title  TBC
Dr Gill Tully, The Forensic Science Regulator

Elliot Room:  Tackling modern slavery: A focus on human trafficking for labour exploitation

Chair: Dr Ella Cockbain, UCL Security and Crime Science

The people, places and processes behind labour trafficking in the UK
Dr Ella Cockbain, UCL Security and Crime Science

National Policing Portfolio: Shaping the police services response to understanding & tackling Modern Slavery
Clare Gollop, Devon and Cornwall Police

Challenges in enforcing, prosecuting and adjudicating labour exploitation
Luuk Esser, National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence against Children in the Netherlands

Hyper-precarity as a lens for understanding and tackling forced labour
Louise Waite & Dr Hannah Lewis, University of Leeds

12.45 – 13.45 Lunch and Student Posters


13.45 Auditorium:  Afternoon Plenary

Chair: Professor Shane Johnson, UCL Security and Crime Science

The Robocop Paradox

Dr. P. Jeffrey Brantingham, Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles

14.30 Coffee and Student Posters

15.00 Parallel Sessions

Auditorium: Explosives – advances in ‘pre-blast’ and 'post-blast' research

Chair: Dr Nadia Abdul-Karim, UCL Chemistry

Talk title TBC
Dr Bill Proud, Imperial College University

The threat to London - 10 Years on from 7/7
David Frisby, Metropolitan Police

Airborne vehicle detection of explosives
Kevin To, Home Office CAST

Trace contamination characterisation of crystalline and plastic explosives
Natasha Stevens, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory

Bronte Room: The evolution of cybercriminal operations  - from commodity malware to targeted attacks

Chair: Dr Gianluca Stringhini, UCL Security and Crime Science

Combating modern malware:  challenges and some approaches to today's malware detection and analysis
Marco Cova, Lastline

Attributing Cyber Attacks
Ben Buchanan, Kings College London

Any time, any place, anywhere: the growing threat to mobile devices
David Emm, Kaspersky Lab

Elliot: Advances in sensing with security applications

Chair: Dr Matthew Richie, UCL Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Active and Passive Radar for Defense and Security
Dr Francesco Fioranelli, UCL Radar Group

New sensors for ionising radiation in security applications
Professor Robert Speller, UCL Medical Physics

Can radar spot drones?
Dr Mohammed Jahangir, Aveillant

16.00 Break

16.15 Auditorium:  Panel Discussion: "What is the most pressing crime problem facing Western societies today - cybercrime, extremism or something else entirely?"

Chair: Steve Welsh, National Crime Agency

Panelists:

Gary Platt, United Nations
David Emm, Kaspersky Lab
Marco Cova, Lastline
Professor Paul Ekblom, Central St Martins

17.00 Drinks and networking

Registration for the International Crime Science conference can be accessed via this link.


Registration costs

  • Early bird rate:   £199
  • Concessionary Rate (Probationary police officers, UCL and non-UCL students and UCL Staff only):   £99
  • Speakers and invited guests - Use the code provided by the administrator


To book please click on this link.

Speakers and abstracts

 
Professor Gloria Laycock, OBE
 
Gloria Laycock  

BIOGRAPHY

Gloria Laycock graduated in psychology from University College London in 1968 and completed her PhD at UCL in 1975. She worked in the Home Office for over thirty years of which almost twenty years were spent on research and development in the policing and crime prevention fields. She has extensive research experience in the UK and has acted as a consultant and trainer on policing and crime prevention in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand, Israel, India, South Africa and the Middle East.

In 1999 she was awarded an International Visiting Fellowship by the United States Department of Justice based in Washington DC. She returned to the UK in April 2001 from a four-month consultancy at the Australian Institute of Criminology in Canberra to become Founding Director of the UCL Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science. In 2010 she took special leave from UCL to establish the Community Policing and Police Science Institute in Abu Dhabi, UAE. She has now returned to UCL as Professor of Crime Science and is Director of the Commissioned Partnership Research Consortium of eight UK universities supporting the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction.

She was awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours 2008 for services to crime policy.

SESSION TITLE

What works in Crime Reduction – Systematic Reviews

ABSTRACT

This session will describe the results of some of the systematic reviews now completed as part of the 'What Works in Crime Reduction' research programme. it will cover aspects of domestic violence, knife crime and alley gating. Some theoretical and procedural issues will be raised for discussion.

 
Professor Shane Johnson
 
Shane Johnson  

BIOGRAPHY

Shane D. Johnson is a professor in the Department of Security and Crime Science, University College London. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, and has particular interests in exploring how methods from other disciplines can inform understanding of crime and security issues. His work has been funded by a variety of sponsors including the AHRC, ESRC, EPSRC, British Academy, Leverhulme Trust, Home Office and various police forces.  In 2015, he received a Chief Constable’s commendation for his contribution to the College of Policing’s what works to reduce crime online toolkit.

SESSION TITLE

Shane will Chair the afternoon plenary

 
Dr Paul Gill  
Paul Gill  
BIOGRAPHY
Dr Paul Gill is a lecturer in Security and Crime Science. Previous to joining UCL, Dr Gill was a postdoctoral research fellow at the International Center for the Study of Terrorism at Pennsylvania State University. He has previously managed projects funded by the Office for Naval Research and the Department of Homeland Security. These projects focused upon various aspects of terrorist behavior including the nature of malevolent creativity, terrorist network structures, terrorist leaders and lone-actor terrorism.

His doctoral research focused on the underlying individual and organizational motivations behind suicide bombing. This piece of research won the Jean Blondel Prize for the best PhD thesis in Political Science in Europe for 2010.

Dr Gill holds a PhD in Political Science, an MA in International Relations, and a BSocSc(Int) from the School of Politics and International Relations in University College Dublin, Ireland.

ABSTRACT TITLE

Similar Crimes, Similar Behaviors? Comparing Lone Actor Terrorists and Solo Mass Murderers

Objective - We compare demographic, psychological and behavioral (offense-related) variables across 71 lone actor terrorists and 115 solo mass murderers. These actors are more often than not assumed to be distinct, with little validity for comparison. Yet, both engage (or attempt to engage) in largely public and highly publicized acts of violence and often use similar weapons. While the outcomes of these acts often share multiple features, we ask if the respective actor trajectories into violence may be equally similar.

Method – We utilize a series of bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses drawing upon a comprehensive new dataset of offender behavior.

Results – The results indicate that there is little to distinguish these offender types in terms of their socio-demographic profiles however their behaviors significantly differ with regards to (a) the degree to which they interact with co-ideologues (b) their antecedent event behaviors and (c) the degree to which they leak information prior to the attack

Conclusions - One of the major implications of comparative analyses such as this could be to provide guidance or a framework to those tasked with responding to such phenomena. Given our counter-intuitive findings on the leakage of intent, this may be particularly relevant in terms of early disruption of plots. An understanding of this complexity and the multiplicity of potential factors could help inform how threat assessments of particular lone actors should be carried out. When we talk about ‘threat’, and the related concept of risk, we need to consider multiple, overlapping questions including issues related to identification of threats (e.g. threat of what precisely?), exposure (e.g. under what conditions are particular offences more likely?) and management (i.e. which interventions are likely to be effective in terms of mitigating either risk, broadly speaking, or a specific threat)
 
Dr Paul Ekblom
 
Dr Paul Ekblom  

BIOGRAPHY
Paul Ekblom read psychology and gained his PhD at University College London. As a researcher in the UK Home Office for many years, Paul initially worked on crime prevention projects including police truancy patrols, shoplifting, drink and disorder, and crime on the London Underground.  He then orchestrated the industrial-scale evaluation of the Safer Cities Programme, focusing on the impact of residential burglary projects. Final Home Office responsibilities centred on horizon-scanning; advising on Design against Crime (including on Safer Places, the government guide to crime prevention and the planning system, and the Foresight project Cyber Trust and Crime Prevention) and developing the professional discipline and knowledge management of crime prevention. 

Paul has worked internationally with EU Crime Prevention Network, Europol, Council of Europe, Australian Institute of Criminology, Government of Abu Dhabi, and UN. He is currently part-time Professor at the University of the Arts London Research Centre on Design Against Crime, based at Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design; also Visiting Professor at the Applied Criminology Centre, University of Huddersfield, and the Department of Security and Crime Science, UCL. His current work covers design and evaluation of products, places, systems and communications; horizon-scanning, and developing practice-knowledge and process evaluation frameworks for general and cyber crime prevention, community safety, counter-terrorism and problem-oriented policing. These frameworks can be viewed at www.designagainstcrime.com/methodology-resources/crime-frameworks and http://5isframework.wordpress.com.

 
Professor Alex Hirschfield  
Alex Hirschfield  

BIOGRAPHY
Alex Hirschfield took up the position of Professor of Criminology and Director of the Applied Criminology Centre at the University of Huddersfield in September 2004. He graduated from the University of Leeds with a BA and a Ph.D. in Human Geography. In 1989, after five years as a policy planner in local government, he became Research Coordinator of a multi-disciplinary ESRC-funded Regional Research at the University of Liverpool. In 1998 he was appointed a senior lecturer (Department of Civic Design, University of Liverpool) and in 2001 secured a readership in urban research.

His research interests include environmental criminology, situational and technological approaches to crime reduction, urban regeneration, policy evaluation and health impact assessment. He has secured research funding from ESRC (Crime and Social Order Programme), EPSRC (Technologies for Crime Prevention and Detection), the EU and a range of government agencies including the Home Office, Department of Health, Department for Transport, Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM), Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure and numerous regeneration partnerships. Between 2002 and 2009 he served as Home Office Senior Adviser to Government Office North West and until recently was a Knowledge Transfer Champion with the Regional Development Agency, Yorkshire Forward. He was appointed to the Board of the Yorkshire and Humberside Fraud Forum in 2008. His other research work is in public health and in 2006 he was elected a Fellow of the Faculty of Public Health. He became a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy in 2011. Current projects include PreEmpt, a study for the EU of what works in protecting against and preparing for terrorist attacks at complex land transport hubs

 

PRESENTATION TITLE


Exploiting Theoretical Frameworks to the Full: A best practice review of situational approaches for protecting Multi-Modal Passenger Termini from terrorist attack

ABSTRACT


This paper discusses the creation and use of a Conceptual Attack Framework (CAF) to help identify best practice in protecting Multi-Modal Passenger Termini (MMPTs) against terrorist attack in the EU. MMPTs are where different forms of transportation and land use converge (e.g. sites combining railway station, bus terminal and shopping mall) and their complexity renders them hard to protect against terrorist attack. 

In the absence of substantial research and evaluation specifically on the protection of MMPTS or similar sites, the CAF performs a key function in identifying theoretically plausible terrorist attack opportunities and ways of blocking these through direct extrapolation from tested theory in situational prevention. Its novel and pivotal role resides first, in the design and implementation of the research instruments (e.g. search terms for the systematic review of published and grey literature, what to examine in visual audits of vulnerable sites, questions in interviews with security personnel); and second, in organising and structuring research findings and practice knowledge to facilitate protection of MMPTs by security staff. In particular, by revealing a) what proportion of the ‘entire space of attack possibilities’ (mapped out by the CAF using crime scripts and causal models) has been researched, in terms of threats and interventions to tackle them; b) how many of these threats and responses fall within security personnel’s awareness space; c) which theoretically plausible opportunities have been ignored by both researchers and practitioners; d) what additional insights are needed to identify what works, how and for whom.

The paper concludes by discussing how this 'operationalisation' of  theoretical frameworks can embed them far more in the dynamics of research and problem solving  and how more thought must be given to how to evaluate their utility and impact. In particular, would conventional evaluation techniques suffice? What would constitute the 'counterfactual' in assessing their utility? And finally, how can the effectiveness of theoretical frameworks in the identification and knowledge transfer of best practice in counter terrorism be maximised?

 
Dr Amy Thornton  
Dr Amy Thornton  

BIOGRAPHY


Amy Thornton was recently awarded her PhD from UCL as part of the Department of Security and Crime Science’s SECReT Doctoral Training Centre. Focussing on the emergence of radicalising settings in different contexts, Amy conducted interviews with former far-right and Islamist radicals, and de-radicalisation professionals in the UK, USA and Canada, allowing her to explore best practices in de-radicalisation and counter-radicalisation programmes in these countries. Her PhD was conducted with partnerships with the Institute for Strategic Dialogue, Home Office and Crown Prosecution Service. With a background in political science and conflict studies, Amy has previously worked with the Red Cross in Sierra Leone, with Berlin’s city government researching security implications of refugee integration, and with the Government of Jordan assessing the human security impact of Iraqi refugees. Amy currently works as a Research Associate in the Department of Security and Crime Science on the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction, evaluating crime prevention initiatives and presenting this evidence to practitioners. As well as teaching on the Countering Organised Crime and Terrorism MSc at UCL, Amy has presented at conferences and workshops in the UK and internationally for academics, practitioners and governments. She has also worked on European FP7 projects PRIME and Vox-Pol, both focussed on understanding and countering radicalisation.

PRESENTATION TITLE


Deradicalisation and counter-radicalisation programmes: Evidence and lessons from the UK, US and Canada

ABSTRACT


This presentation will discuss the UK government’s counter/de-radicalisation programme, Channel, and non-governmental counterparts in the USA and Canada. Based upon research conducted in the three countries with former right-wing and Islamist extremists, as well as professionals working on the Channel programme, these counter- and de-radicalisation programmes will be explored, analysed, and best practices identified. The Channel programme identifies individuals who are vulnerable to radicalisation, or who have already been radicalised, seeking to reduce that vulnerability and de-radicalise individuals where necessary. This may include provision of ideological assistance by intervention providers who specialise in Islamist or right-wing ideologies. Research identified a number of areas of discussion, including the choice of intervention providers to these vulnerable individuals, the training of these providers, the choice of participants in the programme, and the place of schools and youths within Channel. The strengths and weaknesses of Channel will be discussed, and comparisons then drawn with non-governmental programmes in the USA and Canada. Special attention will be paid to the importance of different contexts when practitioners are designing and implementing counter- and de-radicalisation programmes in order for them to be a success.

 
Rob Cutler  
Rob Cutler  
BIOGRAPHY
Rob is a partner focussing on financial crime issues for financial services clients of KPMG. Prior to joining KPMG, Rob spent 11 years working for a number of institutions in the city in head of Financial Crime and AML Compliance roles, and previously spent six years working as a Financial Crime Regulatory Advisor at a big four firm.

SESSION TITLE
Rob is chairing the session on Illicit Money in the Era of Big data
 
Professor Michael Levi  
Professor Michael Levi  
BIOGRAPHY
Michael Levi has degrees from Oxford, Cambridge, Southampton and Cardiff Universities and has been Professor of Criminology at Cardiff University since 1991.  He has been conducting international research on the control of white-collar and organised crime, corruption and money laundering/ financing of terrorism since 1972, and has received major international scholarly prizes for his work, most recently in 2013 he was given the Distinguished Scholar Award by the International Association for the Study of Organised Crime, and in 2014 he was awarded the Sellin-Glueck prize for international and comparative criminology by the American Society of Criminology.  Current public roles include Member of the European Commission Group of Experts on Corruption; Crime Statistics Advisory Committee; Center for Global Development Working Group on illicit financial flows; EC Asset Recovery Office Working Group; and Strategic Advisory Group to the RCUK’s Partnership for Conflict, Crime & Security Research.

He is currently engaged in Research Council UK, City of London Corporation and other work on the detection of insider cyber frauds and other threats, on the cyber-enabled and cyber-dependent component of economic crimes and public-private sector collaboration in the policing of economic crimes, and on the risks of fraud to vulnerable adults from families and unpaid carers. 

He serves on several European Commission and UK advisory groups.  He is also a Senior Fellow of Rand Europe and an Associate Fellow of the Royal United Services Institute.

PRESENTATION TITLE
Money Laundering Opportunities and Controls in the Age of the Algorithm

ABSTRACT
Money laundering hype is everywhere:  apparently every year it is getting more sophisticated and more ‘organised’.  The talk tries to differentiate sense from nonsense in these assertions, and sets out some problems as well as benefits in attempts to control money laundering via Big Data techniques.
 
Richard Lowe  
Richard Lowe  

BIOGRAPHY
Richard Lowe works in the Economic Crime Command of National Crime Agency leading work on countering key money laundering threats.

He has specialised for many years in leading anti-money laundering programs in work at NCA and previously the Serious Organised Crime Agency and HM Customs and Excise. He has worked extensively with law enforcement, supervisors and the private sector in UK and around the world to identify and prevent money laundering. He is also a practicing expert witness on money laundering giving regular evidence in UK court cases for NCA, SOCA, HMRC and Police Forces for over ten years.

PRESENTATION TITLE
Criminal motivation and money laundering

ABSTRACT
Escaping the constraints of placement, layering & integration to look at what criminals are seeking to achieve, and how this may help in using data to identify money laundering.

 
Nadia Abdul-Karim  
Nadia Abdul-Karim  
BIOGRAPHY
Nadia Abdul-Karim is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in the Chemistry department at University College London and is the founder and chair of the UCL Explosives Working Group (EWG). The UCL EWG is a forum that facilitates cross-disciplinary networking and collaboration between UCL students, staff and external partners whose primary research interests are related (in various ways) to explosive materials. 

Nadia’s principal research interests are focused on the mechanisms of post-blast condensed phase explosive residue formation and dispersal during detonation events that involve both military and improvised explosive charges. Drawing upon the fields of detonation chemistry, shock physics and forensic science, this multidisciplinary topic has both fundamental and applied aspects to it, with significant implications on the forensic investigations of bomb scenes. Nadia’s work has been funded by the EPSRC and she also has successful academic collaborations with Cranfield Defence Academy, the Metropolitan Police and DSTL.

Nadia is a member of a number of national societies and served as a committee member of the Shock Waves and Extreme Conditions group of the IOP during her PhD. In 2015, she was invited to deliver the guest lecture at the RSC North section AGM. Aside from her academic role, Nadia is actively involved in science communication activities; her projects have attracted funding from a variety of sources and she has been awarded the UCL Provost’s Award for Public Engagement.

SESSION

Nadia will be chairing the session on Explosives – ‘pre-blast’ and ‘post-blast’ research
 
David Frisby  
BIOGRAPHY
23 years service within the Metropolitan Police, engaged in CT Policing since 2004. Part of SO15 Forensic Management Team for last 6 years. Various deployments including Tavistock Square, Kuta Bech, Bali, Westgate Mall, Nairobi and Algiers post In Amenas Disaster

PRESENTATION TITLE
The threat to London - 10 Years on from 7/7
 
Natasha Stevens
 
Natasha Stevens  
BIOGRAPHY
Natasha Stevens is a graduate scientist at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory in the Counter Terrorism and Security Division. Her main areas of work revolve around Mass Spectroscopy based techniques, largely LCMS, in support of the analytical capability of the Explosives Detection Group.

PRESENTATION TITLE
Trace contamination characterisation of crystalline and plastic explosives

ABSTRACT
Trace explosives characterisation and phenomenology has historically focussed on plastic explosives and trials which simulate the manufacture and concealment of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs).  The increasing use by terrorists of home-made and crystalline explosives presents a number of challenges.  Are previous studies using plastic explosives relevant to a crystalline explosives threat, and how can contamination be characterised for sensitive crystalline explosives which are not safe to handle in bulk quantities?

Dstl has developed a standardised method of safely generating trace contamination arising from any explosives threat.  The system is based on a force testing rig modified to depress a cast silicone thumb.  The thumb includes ridge detail essential to the spread of explosives contamination.  This system has successfully been used to produce fingerprint contamination depletion series of a range of crystalline explosives onto three different surfaces: ABS plastic, brushed aluminium and glass.  The contamination generated has been studied by microscopy and liquid extraction LC-MS. 

An automated test system has also been developed for swabbing based on a Crockmeter.  This system, designed to test clothing colourfastness, provides a realistic mimic for the action of swabbing.  A protocol to test explosives recovery from surfaces has been tested using explosives and glass microspheres.

 
 Professor Chris Hankin  
Chris Hankin  

BIOGRAPHY

Professor Hankin joined Imperial in 1984 and was promoted to Professor in 1995. He is Director of the Institute for Security Science and Technology. His research is in theoretical computer science and cyber security. He leads multidisciplinary projects focussed on developing advanced visual analytics and providing better decision support to defend against cyber attacks. He is Director of the CPNI/EPSRC Research Institute on Trustworthy Industrial Control Systems. He is immediate past President of the Scientific Council of INRIA, the French national institute for research in computer science and control, and Vice Chair of the DG CONNECT Advisory Forum for the European Commission.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Data Analytics and Sense-Making

ABSTRACT

The talk will review the techniques for extracting information from data that we have developed over a number of years.  We will also highlight some of the challenges faced by academics — particularly when working in support of crime-fighting and security analysts.  We will conclude with some future directions.

 
Dr Mike MacIntyre  
Mike Macintyre  

BIOGRAPHY
Mike is Chief Scientist at Panaseer and has a PhD in Astrophysics from the University of Sussex. He has built a career in industry developing threat models and data analytic solutions that address the challenges in financial crime and cyber security. At BAE Systems Mike led the security analytics team which developed the threat detection algorithms used to identify APT and Insider threats in organisations. In his role at Panaseer, Mike is responsible for researching, experimenting and applying analytic techniques to derive new insights in cyber security. His current research involves the derivation of practical cyber risk metrics and further development of anomaly detection techniques.

PRESENTATION TITLE


Reclaiming the White Elephant

ABSTRACT


Is Hadoop adoption rising or falling? It depends. As a low cost storage option uptake is high but when it comes to analytical use cases, and in particular in security, there appears to be a lot of White elephants wandering around enterprise server rooms. This talk explores some of the reasons why Hadoop implementations fail to meet initial expectations but delivers practical advice on how it is possible to build a successful security insight function that exploits the best of the Hadoop ecosystem.

 
Carol Vigurs  
Carol Vigurs  

BIOGRAPHY
Carol is a researcher from the Evidence for Public Policy and Practice Information Coordinating Centre, (EPPI-Centre), which is a research unit of UCL-Institute of Education, and is currently working on the 'What Works in Crime Reduction' research programme to produce a series of systematic maps and systematic reviews on domestic violence and police interactions with people with mental ill health.  Carol is also currently the lead reviewer on the UK National Institute for Care Excellence (NICE) Collaborating Centre for Social Care’ of models of service delivery for people with learning disabilities and challenging behaviour.  Previous systematic review work relevant to the criminal justice field includes a review of interventions to prevent reoffending in young people, Targeted Youth Support : a rapid evidence assessment of early interventions for youth at risk of future poor outcomes, and a systematic review of the literature on youth work.
PRESENTATION TITLE
A systematic review of motivational approaches as a pre-treatment intervention for domestic violence perpetrator programmes
ABSTRACT
This talk will report on the findings from a systematic review of motivational interviewing or other motivational enhancing interventions that were adjuncts to domestic violence perpetrator programmes.

Review questions – what works for perpetrators of domestic violence
The evidence to date regarding the efficacy of domestic violence perpetrator programmes for domestic violence  has shown little clear success (Vigurs et al 2015). However, One review (Eckhardt, 2013) included in the systematic review of reviews (Vigurs  et al 2015) found that interventions that focused on stages-of-change motivational interviewing group sessions had lower rates of recidivism compared to a traditional Duluth model programme and informed the basis of this systematic review.

Methods

Studies were included if they reduced recidivism after attending the attached perpetrator  programme or increased programme attendance and completion, (studies that only reported changes in attitudes or beliefs were excluded), the study compared two groups,  and was of sufficient methodological rigor in its study design, stated theory of change, and implementation.

Findings

Results from the meta analysis found a statistically significant difference in reducing reports of spouse/ partner physical re-abuse in the 6-12 months follow up. The pooled effect size of three studies that reported on victim –reported outcomes was d=.42.

The overall effect of motivational interviewing on increasing programme completion for the post treatment standard perpetrator programme was also statistically significant d=0.8.

The effect of the motivational interviewing was associated with the ‘stage of change’ of the perpetrator, that is, those with lower scores on stages in the change process were more likely to show greater benefits in terms of programme completion and recidivism compared to  control groups.  The association also holds in that perpetrators in later stages of change do not benefit from motivational interviewing or enhancement: In fact it may even be harmful, as the length of time attending the motivational enhancing pre-treatment programme only delays their efforts to seek action to change.

 
 Aiden Sidebottom
 
Aiden Sidebottom  

 BIOGRAPHY

Aiden Sidebottom is a lecturer in the Department of Security and Crime Science at University College London. His main research interests are crime prevention evaluation and problem-oriented policing. Recent research has focused on methods of synthesising research evidence to better inform crime prevention policy and practice, undertaken in collaboration with the UK College of Policing. He has published over 30 articles in journals such as Criminology and Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Gating alleys to reduce crime: A meta-analysis and realist synthesis

ABSTRACT

Alley gates are a widespread burglary reduction measure in the UK. This paper will describe the mixed methods approach taken to systematically review the evidence on alley gating as a crime reduction method. The results of and difficulties encountered in carrying out such a review will be discussed.

 
Dr. P. Jeffrey Brantingham  
jeff-brantingham  

 BIOGRAPHY

Jeff Brantingham is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California Los Angeles. His research interests lie in the study of human behavior in complex environments, including offender mobility, offender target selection and the organization of criminal street gangs.

Jeff directs the UC Mathematical and Simulation Modeling of Crime Project (UC MaSC), a collaboration between mathematicians, social scientists and law enforcement agencies aimed at understanding criminal behavior and crime hotspot formation. The goal of this research is to seek model-driven crime prevention and policing strategies. He has published more than 50 academic journal articles. His work on the mathematics of crime and predictive policing has received widespread media coverage including features by the Associated Press, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Economist, and BBC, NBC and CBS News. Jeff is a co-founder of PredPol, a company dedicated to delivering real-time crime predictions to law enforcement agencies.

PRESENTATION TITLE

The Robocop Paradox

ABSTRACT

A dominant trend in 21st Century policing is the delivery of ever more data at an increasing rate directly to officers on the street. Outlandish science fiction fears aside, we should welcome this trend. There seems to be little doubt that data-driven policing is much better than policing solely on the basis of officer knowledge, skills and experience. If policing decisions in particular situations are made better with data, then more data deployed in more situations should yield better decisions and outcomes all around.  Robocop is closer to reality than we might realize. As practitioners well know, however, there are significant barriers to data-driven policing, especially at the street level. Police, like all human decision makers, are  inclined to reject data in favor of their own intuition and experience.  Even if police accept data as part of the decision making process, they quite naturally struggle with how to interpret those data. As desirable as data-driven policing might be, it is very challenging to sustain the presence of data in street-level decision making.  Robocop in this sense seems just as fanciful as ever.  Here I will look closely at a case study of place-based predictive policing in Los Angeles with the goal of resolving this paradox. Using nearly two-years worth of predictive-policing patrol data I evaluate the interplay between probabilistic crime forecasts and officer preferences in determining patrol patterns. The implications for more successful delivery of data into patrol officers hands are discussed.

 
Dr Gianluca Stringhini
 
Gianluca Stringhini  

BIOGRAPHY
Dr Gianluca Stringhini is a lecturer in the Departments of Computer Science and Security and Crime Science at UCL . His research interests include cybercrime, network security, social network security, web security, and malware analysis. His work was awarded a Best Paper Award at ACSAC in 2010 and a Symantec Research Labs Graduate Fellowship in 2012. Dr Stringhini holds a PhD from UC Santa Barbara, and his thesis work received the Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Department of Computer Science at UCSB in 2014

SESSION TITLE

The evolution of cybercriminal operations  - from commodity malware to targeted attacks

 
Ben Buchanan
 
Ben Buchanan  

BIOGRAPHY
Ben Buchanan is a PhD candidate at King's College London in the Department of War Studies. His thesis examines the intersection of cybersecurity and national strategy. Additionally, Ben has published journal articles on cyber deterrence and on attributing cyber attacks. Prior to coming to King's, he served in a variety of roles in policing, software design, counterterrorism, and pre-hospital care. He is a certified computer forensic analyst and a Marshall Scholar.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Attributing Cyber Attacks

ABSTRACT

Who did it? Attribution is fundamental. Human lives and the security of the state may depend on ascribing agency to an agent. In the context of computer network intrusions, attribution is commonly seen as one of the most intractable technical problems, as either solvable or not solvable, and as dependent mainly on the available forensic evidence. But is it? Is this a productive understanding of attribution? — This article argues that attribution is what states make of it. To show how, we introduce the Q Model: designed to explain, guide, and improve the making of attribution. Matching an offender to an offence is an exercise in minimising uncertainty on three levels: tactically, attribution is an art as well as a science; operationally, attribution is a nuanced process not a black-and-white problem; and strategically, attribution is a function of what is at stake politically. Successful attribution requires a range of skills on all levels, careful management, time, leadership, stress-testing, prudent communication, and recognising limitations and challenges.

 
David Emm
 
David Emm  

BIOGRAPHY

David Emm is Principal Security Researcher at Kaspersky Lab, a provider of security and threat management solutions. He has been with Kaspersky Lab since 2004 and is currently part of the company's Global Research and Analysis Team. He has worked in the anti-malware industry since 1990 in a variety of roles, including that of Senior Technology Consultant at Dr Solomon's Software, and Systems Engineer and Product Manager at McAfee. In his current role, David regularly delivers presentations on malware and other IT threats at exhibitions and events, highlighting what organisations and consumers can do to stay safe online. He also provides comment to broadcast and print media on the ever-changing cyber-security and threat landscape. David has a strong interest in malware, ID theft and the security industry in general and helped to develop the company's Malware Defence Workshop. He is a knowledgeable advisor on all aspects of online security.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Any time, any place, anywhere: the growing threat to mobile devices 

ABSTRACT


We live in a connected world. Most of us are now 'always-on': at home, at work, at the airport, in the cafe and anywhere else we can get a wireless signal. The use of smartphones and tablets is now well-established - including the use of personal devices at work. This has created new opportunities for cybercriminals and the volume of malware is growing rapidly. On top of this, there's the risk of data leakage from lost or stolen devices. This presentation will highlight the growing threat from mobile malware, the forms it takes and the impact it can have, as well as offering some guidelines for reducing the risk of attack.

 
Alex Gibberd
 
Alex Gibberd  

BIOGRAPHY

Alex Gibberd is a PhD student at University College London, supervised by Dr James Nelson (UCL Statistics) he is hosted within both the Statistical Science and Security and Crime Science departments. Funded by the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory (DSTL), his research focuses on understanding multivariate time-series data with applications to anomaly detection within computer networks. He currently holds an MPhys degree in Astrophysics (St-Andrews), and MRes in Security Science (UCL).

SESSION TITLE

Data-Science for Security and Intelligence

ABSTRACT

The complex and often large data-sets provided by modern big-data strategies require analytic tools in order to provide insight. In this session we consider how information extraction methods are developed from both academic and industrial settings. After introducing examples, we discuss some implications of using such methods in security applications. For example: How do we obtain pragmatic intelligence from analytic methods? How do we understand the bias of our methods? How do we balance privacy and intelligence? 

 
Luuk Esser LL.M
 
Luke Esser  

BIOGRAPHY
Luuk Esser is a researcher with the Office of the Dutch Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and affiliated as an external PhD Candidate with Leiden Law School (Leiden University).

PRESENTATION TITLE

Challenges in enforcing, prosecuting and adjudicating labour exploitation

ABSTRACT

The multifaceted character of trafficking in human beings for labour exploitation poses major challenges to law enforcement officials, prosecutors and judges. Because of the divergent forms in which the phenomenon can occur it differs from case to case which organisations are involved and how they could and should respond and cooperate with each other. Moreover, different forms of labour exploitation ask for different approaches. Mr. Luuk Esser, a researcher with the Dutch Rapporteur and PhD Candidate at Leiden Law School, will highlight the difficulties that occur when enforcing, prosecuting and adjudicating labour exploitation cases and will point at some pitfalls and best practices from the Netherlands. Do perceptions of victims play a role? How to deal with cultural backgrounds of perpetrators and victims? And, if cooperation is key, how could we reach it?

 
Dr Ella Cockbain
 
Ella Cockbain  

BIOGRAPHY

Dr Ella Cockbain is a researcher at UCL whose work focuses on serious and organised crime and its prevention, especially human trafficking, child sexual exploitation and forced labour. She currently holds an ESRC 'Future Research Leaders' Fellowship for a three-year study into labour trafficking, in collaboration with Professor Kate Bowers and the National Crime Agency. Their ongoing research has helped inform counter-trafficking strategy, including through input into the National Threat Group on Human Trafficking, National Policing and the Home Office's Modern Slavery Unit. Ella recently co-edited with J. Knutsson her first book: 'Applied Police Research: Challenges and Opportunities' (Routledge, 2014).

SESSION TITLE

Tackling modern slavery: A focus on human trafficking for labour exploitation

ABSTRACT

Human trafficking and modern slavery continue to move up the national and international threat agenda. Empirical evidence is, however, notoriously scant in this field. In this session, we will bring together a range of practitioner and academic perspectives to share new evidence and insights into the characteristics and challenges of human trafficking. Our particular focus will be on labour trafficking, an increasingly important but often overshadowed form of trafficking.

 
Claire Gollop
 
   

BIOGRAPHY

Clare has been operating within a range of law enforcement and security environments in the UK and overseas over the past decade in analytical, policy, and investigative roles, and is currently working within the National Policing Portfolio to help improve the way that Modern Slavery is understood, and analysed by UK Police agencies. She was an early graduate of UCL’s MSc in Countering Organised Crime & Terrorism and has since encouraged the development of approaches to understanding threat, risk and harm in a range of linked environments.

PRESENTATION TITLE

National Policing Portfolio: Shaping the police services response to understanding & tackling Modern Slavery

ABSTRACT

This talk will describe the way in which UK policing is seeking to evolve in order to better identify and combat modern slavery, including labour exploitation, and the role of analysis in helping partnerships (at local and national level) design upstream prevention and demand reduction responses. It uses crime scripts and process charts created during recent labour exploitation operations to discuss the methodology of offending and to assist different agencies and communities to identify potential intervention points – at a tactical and strategic level.

 
Professor Louise Waite
 
Louise Waite  

BIOGRAPHY

Louise Waite is Associate Professor in Human Geography at the University of Leeds, UK. Her research interests span migration, citizenship and belonging; with a particular focus on unfree/forced labour and exploitative work among asylum seekers and refugees in the UK. She has published on these themes in a range of peer reviewed journals and in recent books: Precarious lives: forced labour, exploitation and asylum (with H. Lewis, S. Hodkinson & P. Dwyer, Policy Press, 2014) and Citizenship, belonging and intergenerational relations in African migration  (with C. Attias-Donfut, J. Cook & J. Hoffman, Palgrave, 2012).


PRESENTATION TITLE

Hyper-precarity as a lens for understanding and tackling forced labour

ABSTRACT

The topic of forced labour is receiving a growing amount of political and policy attention across the globe. This paper makes two clear contributions to emerging debates. First, we focus on a group who are seldom explicitly considered in forced labour debates; forced migrants who interact with the asylum system. We build an argument of the production of susceptibility to forced labour through the UK’s asylum system. Second, we argue that forced labour needs to be understood as part of, and an outcome of, widespread normalised precarious work. Using precarity as a lens to examine forced labour encourages the recognition of extreme forms of exploitation as part of a wider picture of systematic exploitation of migrants in the labour market which distances from the dominant approach suggested through a ‘trafficking’ lens of ‘rescuing’ ‘victims’. Viewing forced labour as connected to precarity draws into question the assertion of criminalisation of trafficking as a principle remedy, and suggests different avenues and tools for tackling severe labour exploitation as part of the wider struggle for migrant labour rights.

 
Dr Ruth Morgan  
Ruth Morgan  

BIOGRAPHY

Ruth Morgan (MA (Oxon), D.Phil) is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Security and Crime Science, and the Director of the UCL Centre for the Forensic Sciences.  The Centre facilitates a network of UCL academics from a wide range of different disciplines and departments to enable a strategic and multidisciplinary research programme in collaboration with external partners and forensic science stakeholders.

Ruth's research group is focused around the role of physical evidence in the detection of crime and concerns the interpretation of forensic evidence and intelligence.  The research falls into two main areas; evidence dynamics and the interpretation of evidence.  The group is actively seeking to establish empirical evidence bases for understanding the evidence dynamics of trace evidence (soil, sediment, pollen, DNA, gun-shot residue, explosives etc.).  It is also conducting research that addresses the need to develop our understanding of decision-making and the interaction of multiple variables in crime investigation and detection to develop an evidence base to enhance our ability to interpret the analysis of forensic materials more effectively, in order to generate valuable and robust intelligence and evidence.

Ruth serves on a number of national committees, is the Vice Chair of the London Geological Society Forensic Geoscience Group, sits on the editorial board for the journal 'Medicine, Science and the Law', and is a member of the Advisory Board of Inside Justice. She was part of the group that put together the QAA benchmark statement for Forensic Science and acts as External Examiner for a number of UK Universities.  She is also a reviewer for forensic geoscience submissions for a number of internationally peer reviewed journals.

SESSION TITLE

New Approaches in Forensic Evidence Detection and Interpretation

ABSTRACT

This session will offer the opportunity to consider and discuss some of the cutting edge themes within the field of forensic science.  The development of new technologies that can offer analysis at ever increasing levels of resolution has transformed the analysis of forensic evidence, yet the development of approaches that enable the most accurate and transparent frameworks for evidence interpretation is still crucial.  Recent advances in the forensic sciences will be considered and the implications for forensic intelligence and evidence will be explored.

 
David Spiegelhalter
 
David Spiegelhalter  

BIOGRAPHY

David Spiegelhalter is Winton Professor for the Public Understanding of Risk, Professor of Biostatistics and Fellow of Churchill College at Cambridge University. He leads a small team (UnderstandingUncertainty.org) that attempts to improve the way in which risk and uncertainty are taught and discussed in society. He gives many presentations to schools and others, advises organisations on risk communication, and is a regular commentator on risk issues. In 2012 he presented the BBC4 documentary ‘Tails you Win: the Science of Chance’. He was elected FRS in 2005, awarded an OBE in 2006, and was knighted in 2014 for services to medical statistics. In 2011 he came 7th in an episode of Winter Wipeout.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Expressing uncertainty about evidence

ABSTRACT

The likelihood ratio approach to communicating statistical evidence is still contested.  An important issue is dealing with the common, if not universal, situation where there is uncertainty about what the appropriate likelihood ratio should be.  This is analogous to the distinction used in other areas between 'risk', where the chances are agreed, and 'uncertainty', where there is dispute, or lack of evidence, over the magnitude of the numbers.  I shall consider how this situation is dealt with handling evidence in contexts such as medicine and climate change, and examine possible methods for forensic reporting.

 
Dr Phil Edwards
 
Phil Edwards  

BIOGRAPHY

Phil Edwards BSc PhD is a Senior Lecturer in Statistics in the Cochrane Injuries Group, and Head of the Department of Population Health at LSHTM, University of London. His research interests are in injury prevention, transport and health

PRESENTATION TITLE

Mediation, mentoring and peer-support to reduce youth violence: a systematic review

ABSTRACT

Public health approaches that address attitudinal causes of youth violence, and that intervene early on with at-risk youth, may be effective at reducing youth violence. The results of a systematic review of the effects of mentoring, mediation or peer-support interventions to reduce youth violence will be presented.

 
Dr Marco Cova
 
Marco Cova  

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Marco Cova is a senior security researcher and a member of the founding team of Lastline, a company providing anti-malware and breach detection solutions. Before defecting to the industry, he was a Lecturer in Computer Security with the School of Computer Science, University of Birmingham. He has received his PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Marco's research interests include most areas of systems security, with an emphasis on web-based malware analysis and detection, botnets, and vulnerability analysis. He has published more than 25 papers on these topics in leading conferences and journals. He has also led the design and development of Wepawet, a publicly-available service for the analysis of malicious web pages, which are commonly used in cybercriminal operations.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Combating modern malware: challenges and some approaches to today's malware detection and analysis

ABSTRACT

Malware is one of the key elements of today's cybercriminal operations. In particular, malware authors have developed a number of techniques to evade or complicate the analysis of malware samples performed by the state-of-the-art analysis systems (aka sandboxes) used by defenders. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the evasive techniques that malware uses and of some interesting trends in their application and pervasiveness. We will also briefly present a few techniques that can be used to counter such evasive attempts. Finally, we will discuss how large-scale data analysis can help correlating and "connecting the dots" to perform malware forensics.

 
Professor Robert Speller
 
Professor Robert Speller  

BIOGRAPHY

Robert Speller is the Head of the Radiation Physics Group at UCL, Deputy Head of the Department of Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering and is the Joel Professor of Physics Applied to Medicine. He has more than forty years’ experience in radiation physics and has worked in areas such as cosmic ray astronomy, medical imaging and security technology.


PRESENTATION TITLE


New sensors for ionising radiation in security applications

ABSTRACT


Active and passive measurements of ionising radiation find many applications in the security field. This talk will look at some of the more recent developments in sensor technology in three areas - imaging sensors with extended dynamic range, pixelated energy resolving sensors and directional detection systems. In each case the sensor system will be described along with an example of its application. These applications will cover areas such as the location of special nuclear materials (SNM) and characterisation of suspicious materials.

 
Dr Francesco Fioranelli  
Francesco Fioranelli  

BIOGRAPHY
Dr Francesco Fioranelli is currently a Research Associate at the Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London. His research focuses on the development of bistatic and multistatic radar systems and on the analysis of multistatic radar data, in particular human micro-Doppler signature analysis and classification, small maritime targets detection, and sea clutter characterization. Other research interests include through-wall imaging applications, detection and classification of small drones and UAVs, and analysis of radar signatures of wind turbines.

PRESENTATION TITLE


Active and Passive Radar for Defense and Security

ABSTRACT


This presentation aims at giving an overview of research activities related to the general field of security which are currently carried out within the radar group at the Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London. Topics will include the use of intelligent adaptive underwater sensor networks for mine countermeasures, the development of Ground Penetrating Radar systems for security applications (e.g. landmine detection), the deployment of radar systems for through-wall detection and indoor tracking (both using active and Wi-Fi based passive systems), cognitive radar for increased operational effectiveness, and the use of multistatic human micro-Doppler signatures for the classification of unarmed vs armed personnel.

 
Dr Mohammed Jahangir  
Dr Mohammed Jahangir  

BIOGRAPHY

Dr Jahangir is the lead Algorithm Designer at Aveillant Limited, a Cambridge based world-leading technology firm, developing radar applications based on their unique and patented Holographic RadarTM . Dr Jahangir graduated from Imperial College with 1st Class Honours in Electrical and Electronic Engineering and obtained his PhD in 2000 from University College London in radar signal processing. He has over two decades experience of working on many aspect of surveillance radar signal processing for land, air and maritime applications. He was a senior scientist at QinetiQ, leading the development of novel radar image exploitation techniques and produced several patented solutions. As a senior consultant with the disruptive technology group at L-3 TRL Technology, he specialised in multi-sensor data fusion. He has widely collaborative with academia and industry in his pursuit to drive innovation in radar surveillance techniques and served as industrial supervisor for
student projects and PhD CASE awards. His current focus is on multi-function surveillance radar that harnesses persistent dwell to track difficult targets in complex clutter environment. He has published over 30 journal and conference papers and has served on the technical committee of numerous international conferences. He is an IET mentor and assessor for chartered registration.

PRESENTATION TITLE


Can Radar Spot Drones?

ABSTRACT

Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), commonly referred to as drones, are rapidly proliferating. Whilst the high-end, larger variant UAS have been in operations for defence applications for over two decades, it is the emergence of low-cost drones that is opening the door for a host of civil applications. However, the accessibility of this technology is bringing about new challenges for security and safety. It is the class of micro-UAS which are raising particular concern. The reason being their small size and ability to fly low in a highly irregular manner makes them particularly difficult to detect with conventional wide-area surveillance sensors such as a scanning radar. Aveillant’s Holographic RadarTM , turns the problem on its head by deploying multiple fix beams that surveys the airspace constantly, never losing sight of the target.  It can detect and track an object from the size of a passenger airliner down to a micro-UAS. It harnesses the power of processors, developed for gaming, to be able to produce in real-time complete 3-D view of its coverage area, providing truly situational awareness surveillance. Results from real trials will be presented that show a small hexacopter UAS being successfully tracked by the Aveillant multibeam staring radar. The impact such drone detection radars can make on regulating and influencing the growth of this type of platforms will be discussed.

 
Steve Welsh  
Steve Welsh  
CHAIR, PANEL DISCUSSION

BIOGRAPHY
Steve Welsh is a Senior Manager at the National Crime Agency (NCA) in the UK that was formed in the on 3rd October 2013, succeeding the Serious Organised Crime Agency to lead the UK’s fight to cut serious and organized crime.

Steve is the head of the Behavioural Science & Disruption department in Specialist Operations at Organised Crime Command in the NCA. This Behavioural Science & Disruption capability still constitutes relatively 'new business' for UK law enforcement. Steve’s work includes exploring how psychology and social science may be applied in designing and delivering innovative and proactive evidenced based interventions to disrupt and fragment organized crime networks and its remit includes cyber enabled serious crime.

Steve is also the Project Director for a two year EC ISEC funded international project known as Pol-PRIMETT II (police-private sector partnerships against metal theft) to combat metal theft in the EU by promoting effective partnership initiatives and the adoption of recognized good practice and innovation.

Steve was originally a police officer initially serving in the Metropolitan Police Service. In his 30 years in UK policing he served predominantly as a detective specialising in combating organised crime in proactive covert investigations.

Whilst a police officer Steve was one of the multi-agency team that produced the original National Intelligence Model for UK Law Enforcement. He also led for UK law enforcement in the Home Office project that planned and delivered UK adoption of cross border surveillance within the European Union.  He has represented the UK in EU expert sessions on the topic of international use of proactive covert tactics.

Steve concluded his police service as a Detective Superintendent with the National Crime Squad (NCS) before transferring in to SOCA in 2006 where he managed projects delivering non traditional and innovative responses to organized crime.
 

Page last modified on 05 may 15 11:50