International Crime Science Conference

Nick Ross Chairing

12 July 2017, British Library, LONDON

This year the 11th International Crime Science Conference will take place on Wednesday, 12th July 2017 at the British Library in London. The theme of this year’s conference is "The future of crime: how the crime and security landscape is evolving, and what we can do to respond." 

The conference will showcase leading research that is helping to tackle threats to our society. In particular, it will focus on the way crime and security providers are responding to the challenges created by "crimes of the future". Topics covered will include Future Crimes; Cyber Security, Future Forensics, Security Technologies 2050, The Evolving Terrorist; Organised Crime; Policing the Future, Transport Crime, and Data and Crime. 

Once again, the conference brings together senior security practitioners, policy-makers, technologists and academics, all developing the latest techniques and technologies for preventing crime and increasing security.

(Please note: talk/speaker details will be updated here as they are confirmed)

9.30 Welcome

9.45 Opening Plenary

Chair:  Professor Shane Johnson, UCL, Jill Dando Institute

Changing crime and crime prevention
Mike Warren, Home Office


10.30 Coffee and Student Posters

11.00 Parallel Sessions

Auditorium:  The Evolving Terrorist

Chair:  Dr Paul Gill, UCL Jill Dando Institute

Real-time Risk Assessment and Harm Prevention: Models and Methods for Terrorism
Dr Caroline Logan, Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust & University of Manchester

Use of formulation to understand risk of violent extremism in individuals with poor mental health: Examples from Clinical Practice
Nicola Fowler, Prevent In-Place

Bronte Room: Data and Crime

Chair: Dr Toby Davies, UCL Jill Dando Institute

Using open data to evaluate current approaches to cabs tasking
Reka Solymosi, University of Manchester

Real Time Prediction of Drive by Download Attacks on Twitter
Pete Burnap, Cardiff University

Elliot Room: Policing the future (panel discussion)

Chair:  Professor Gloria Laycock, UCL Jill Dando Institute

Crime recording for the Future
Professor Gloria Laycock, UCL Jill Dando Institute

Changing crime and the implications for policing
Harvey Redgrave, Crest Advisory

Policing the future:  building trust and retaining legitimacy
Professor Mike Hough, Birkbeck University


11.45 Parallel Sessions

Auditorium: Future Crimes

Chair: Professor Paul Ekblom, UCL Jill Dando Institute

Crime science-based approaches to horizon-scanning for future crime problems and security solutions
Professor Paul Ekblom, UCL Jill Dando Institute

Sin (Smart) City
Jonathan Geater, Thales e-Security

Exploring new vulnerabilities around connected and autonomous road vehicles
Professor Alan Stevens, Transport Research Lab


Bronte Room: Transport Crime

Chair: Dr Kartikeya Tripathi, UCL Jill Dando Institute

Secure travel on growing urban rail network in India: Hi-tech and high cost
Dr Kartikeya TripathiUCL Jill Dando Institute

The future of border control
Dr Selina Kolokytha, EMPA

How Transport for London is responding to challenges of a changing crime and security landscape
Siwan Hayward, Transport for London

Dickens Room:  Gun violence - the hidden bomb

Chair:  David Perez Esparza, UCL Jill Dando Institute

Illegal firearms: supply and demand, technologies and cultures 
Peter Squires, University of Brighton

Changing Trends in the Types of Firearms Used by Criminals
David W Dyson, Firearms Consultant Ltd

Understanding the Criminal Use of Firearms in the UK
Joanne Chilton, UK National Ballistics Intelligence Service (NABIS)

AI technology for firearms security
Lewis D. Griffin, Rapiscan Systems/ UCL Computer Science


Elliot Room: Future Forensic Science

Chair: Dr Ruth Morgan, UCL JDI Centre for Forensic Sciences

Microbial Forensics and Cyberbiosecurity, The Two Could Be Connected
Randall Murch, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

The Near Future of Cell Site Analysis
Joe Hoy, Forensic Analytics


12.45 – 13.45 Lunch and Student Posters


13.45 Auditorium:  Afternoon Plenary

Chair: Professor Richard WortleyUCL Jill Dando Institute

Digital Investigation and Intelligence (DII) in Disrupted Times
Richard Berry, National Police Chiefs Council

14.30 Coffee and Student Posters

15.00 Parallel Sessions

Auditorium: Cybercrime

Chair: Dr Gianluca Stringhini, UCL Jill Dando Institute

1000 days of UDP amplification DDoS attacks
Daniel Thomas, Cambridge Cybercrime Centre, University of Cambridge

Studying Drug Vendors on the Dark Net
Cerys Bradley, UCL Jill Dando Institute

Tails of the Dark Net
Steve Welsh, National Crime Agency


Bronte Room: Security Technology 2050

Chairs: Dr Kevin Chetty, UCL Jill Dando Institute & Dr Amin Amiri, UCL Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Nefarious Criminal and Terrorist Uses of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Dr Christopher Wyatt, University of Birmingham

GPS Denied UAV Navigation and Tracking/Recognition : A vision Based Approach
Professor Nabil Aouf, Cranfield University

Exploring alternative approaches to device Identification with ICMetrics
Dr Gareth Howells, University of Kent

Elliot Room: OCRN Cyberspace as a New Platform for Organised Crime: A Practitioner Perspective

Chair: Sanaz Zolghadriha, UCL Jill Dando Institute

Digital Criminalistics at the FBI
Supervisory Special Agent and Special Agent, FBI Cyber Behavioural Unit

Criminal use of technology: tackling the challenges, embracing the opportunities
Dr Jamie Saunders, National Crime Agency

*Please note, due to the sensitive material of this panel session, the names of some speakers and the details of the presentations will not be revealed prior to the conference. 


16.00 Break

16.15 Auditorium:  Panel Discussion:

“In a very real sense ‘crimes of the future’ are an emergent property of the advance of civilisation. It is not a question of if new criminal opportunities will be exploited, but when and how. How can resource-poor authorities best respond to this challenge?”

Chair: Steve Welsh, National Crime Agency

Panel members:

Nick RossUCL Jill Dando Institute

Dr Randall MurchVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

FBI representative, FBI Cyber Behavioural Unit

Jon GeaterThales e-Security

17.00 Drinks and networking
Professor Richard Wortley  
richard-wortley  

BIOGRAPHY


Richard Wortley is Director of the Jill Dando Institute at UCL, Head of the Department of Security and Crime Science at UCL and Director of the SECReT Doctoral Training Centre.  He has a PhD in psychology, and worked as a prison psychologist for ten years before moving to academia. He was head of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University (Australia) for 9 years, and is a past national Chair of the Australian Psychological Society’s College of Forensic Psychologists. His research interests centre on environmental criminology and situational crime prevention. In recent years his research has been particularly concerned with the role that immediate environments play in facilitating child sexual abuse. He has been a chief investigator on 8 national competitive grants in Australia with total finding of around $Aus2 million.

WELCOME

CHAIR, Afternoon Plenary

 
Professor Shane Johnson, UCL Jill Dando Institute  
Shane Johnson  

BIOGRAPHY

Shane D Johnson is a Professor and Deputy Head of Department at the UCL Department for Security and Crime Science. He was previously a lecturer in Forensic Psychology and before that a senior research fellow at the University of Liverpool.

Professor Johnson has worked within the fields of criminology and forensic psychology for over 15 years, and has particular interests in exploring how methods from other disciplines (e.g. complexity science) can inform understanding of crime and security issues, and the extent to which theories developed to explain everyday crimes can explain more extreme events such as riots, maritime piracy and insurgency.  His research has been funded by a variety of sponsors including the AHRC, ESRC, EPSRC, Home Office, UK police forces, the Department for the Environment & Rural Affairs (Defra), Department for Education & Skills (DfES), British Academy, and Leverhulme Trust. 


CHAIR, Opening plenary

 
Dr Paul Gill  
Dr Paul Gill  

BIOGRAPHY

Dr Paul Gill is a lecturer in Security and Crime Science. Previous to joining UCL, Dr Gill was a postdoctoral research fellow at the International Center for the Study of Terrorism at Pennsylvania State University. He has previously managed projects funded by the Office for Naval Research and the Department of Homeland Security. These projects focused upon various aspects of terrorist behavior including the nature of malevolent creativity, terrorist network structures, terrorist leaders and lone-actor terrorism.

His doctoral research focused on the underlying individual and organizational motivations behind suicide bombing. This piece of research won the Jean Blondel Prize for the best PhD thesis in Political Science in Europe for 2010.

Dr Gill holds a PhD in Political Science, an MA in International Relations, and a BSocSc(Int) from the School of Politics and International Relations in University College Dublin, Ireland.

CHAIR, The evolving terrorist

 
Dr Caroline Logan  
Caroline Logan  
BIOGRAPHY
Caroline Logan is a Consultant Forensic Clinical Psychologist in Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust and an honorary research fellow in the Division of Psychology and Mental Health at the University of Manchester.  She has worked clinically in the field of risk assessment and management for over 20 years, with men and women with histories of violence in prisons, secure hospitals and in the community.  She has also worked as a consultant with agencies dedicated to the development of policy and best practice around risk assessment and management.  To date, she has published two books and a number of articles on the subject. 

PRESENTATION TITLE
Real-time Risk Assessment and Harm Prevention: Models and Methods for Terrorism

ABSTRACT
Risk assessment in general has evolved considerably in the last 25 years, and the counter-terrorism field has the potential to stand on the shoulders of the giants of that time.  From static measures of near lifetime risk of generic harmful behaviour (e.g., violence) in the 1990s and 2000s, we now benefit from evidence-based procedures that support real-time information gathering, formulation development, and constantly modified risk management, all towards the limitation if not the prevention of harmful outcomes.  In this presentation, the highlights of current practice in the risk field will be outlined briefly, and their relevance to the counter-terrorism field explained.  It will not over-simplify the task of understanding and managing the risk posed by individuals - to do so would be to misrepresent the enormous and complex challenge we face.  Instead, this presentation will offer the hope of progress through the application of rational procedures to comprehend the potential for extremist violence and the disruption of pathways towards its most harmful demonstration.  
 
Nicola Fowler  
Nicola Fowler  
BIOGRAPHY
Nicola is a clinical psychologist with extensive experience working with mentally disordered offenders in community, hospital and prison settings. Her research exploring the broad mental health and psychological needs of individuals at risk of radicalisation has underpinned the development of Prevent In-Place; an NHS-Police partnership which aims to understand and reduce the risk of radicalisation by improving mental health. 

PRESENTATION TITLE
Use of formulation to understand risk of violent extremism in individuals with poor mental health: Examples from Clinical Practice

ABSTRACT
A plethora of models from a wide range of theoretical perspectives have attempted to explain why some individuals commit terrorist atrocities. However, applying these theoretical models to individuals in clinical practice is highly problematic; extremism in all its forms is complex and multifaceted and weak associations are consistently found between any individual factor and risk. To further complicate matters, despite 30-40% of Prevent referrals presenting with a broad range of mental health and psychological difficulties the functional link with extremism, if there is one, is poorly understood.
Prevent In-Place is an innovative NHS-Police partnership which aims to improve clinical outcomes for individuals with mental health and psychological difficulties identified as at risk of radicalisation and to safeguard them from being drawn into extremism. In this presentation, case examples will illustrate how a service model based on formulation may bridge the gap between theory and clinical practice in this highly complex area of risk.
 
Dr Toby Davies  
Toby Davies  

BIOGRAPHY

Toby Davies is a lecturer in the Department of Security & Crime Science at UCL. His background is in mathematics, and his research is concerned with the application of quantitative methods to the modelling and analysis of crime. He has particular interest in the spatio-temporal characteristics of crime, and the modelling of these towards the end goal of crime prediction. In addition, his research involves the application of network science in the context of crime.

CHAIR, Data and Crime

 
Dr Reka Solymosi  
Reka Solymosi  

BIOGRAPHY

PRESENTATION TITLE

Using open data to evaluate current approaches to cabs tasking

ABSTRACT

In the past few years, tackling Taxi and Private Hire Vehicle (TPHV) related sexual offences have become a priority for transit safety in the United Kingdom.  It is known that pickup locations of victims correspond to general passenger pickup location hotspots. To identify these, practitioners rely on proxy measures such as land use data related to the night time economy, or end of route stations of rapid transit (eg: underground).  This paper evaluates the effectiveness of these various indicators against open taxi trip data for New York City. The aim of this paper is to identify the utility of indicators for estimating pickup hotspots in the absence of such data. Results can inform current tasking of police and community safety resources to target shifting hotspots, and reduce the prevalence of TPHV related sexual offences.

 
Pete Burnap  
Pete Burnap  

BIOGRAPHY
I am a Reader in Data Science & Cyber Analytics at Cardiff University - and Social Computing research priority area lead in the School of Computer Science & Informatics’ Complex Systems research group. I have developed a reputation for data-driven, innovative, and interdisciplinary research that broadly contributes to the growing field of Data Science, working closely with the Cardiff School of Social Sciences and School of Engineering. I am an applied computer scientist with a principal focus on data and computational methods to improve understanding, operations and decision making outside of academia, while contributing to the academic fields of Social Computing, Web Science and Cybersecurity. These three fields are integrated within my research through the  analysis and understanding of Web-enabled human and software behaviour, with a particular interest inemerging and future risks posed to civil society, business (economies) and governments. I achieve this using computational methods such as machine learning and statistical data modelling, and interaction and behaviour mining, opinion mining and sentiment analysis to derive key features of interest. My research outcomes, which include more than 50 academic articles – stemming from funded research projects worth over £7.2million, are organised and disseminated via the Social Data Science Lab, within which I am a director and the computational lead. The Lab’s core funding comes from a £450k ESRC grant and it forms part of the £64m ‘Big Data Network’. Core funding runs between 2017 and 2020, during which time the Lab will host 5 post-doctoral researchers and 9 PhD students, all studying topics related to Risk, Safety & Human/Cybersecurity. I am the director of the Airbus Centre of Excellence in Cyber Security Analytics at Cardiff University. 

PRESENTATION TITLE

Real Time Prediction of Drive by Download Attacks on Twitter

ABSTRACT

In a drive-by-download attack, a user's computer system is infected when visiting a malicious web-page (and represents one of the most common attacks employed nowadays). An attacker attempts to lure users to these malicious web-pages so that they can hijack their system by exploiting some system vulnerability. One method used by cyber criminals to attract user traffic to these malicious web-page is by posting the URL of these websites on Twitter. Twitter over the years has emerged as one of the goto place to get update on news, current affairs, entertainment news or to get updates on sporting events and celebrity activities. The popularity of Twitter and its inbuilt feature of shortening a URL, due to its 140 character restriction, gives a cyber criminal an opportunity to obfuscate the URL of a malicious web-page. Cyber criminals carry out a drive by download attack by tweeting a shortened URL pointing to a malicious website around a trending topic. The rationale is to tweet something that will stand out amongst other tweets and will make a user curious enough to click on the shortened URL. In this paper we build a machine learning model using machine activity data and tweet metadata to to detect such URLs at 99% accuracy (using 10-fold cross validation) and 82% (using an unseen test set) at 1 second into the interaction with a URL

 
Professor Gloria LaycockOBE  
Gloria Laycock  

BIOGRAPHY

Gloria Laycock graduated in psychology from University College London in 1968 and completed her PhD at UCL in 1975. She worked in the Home Office for over thirty years of which almost twenty years were spent on research and development in the policing and crime prevention fields. She has extensive research experience in the UK and has acted as a consultant and trainer on policing and crime prevention in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand, Israel, India, South Africa and the Middle East.

In 1999 she was awarded an International Visiting Fellowship by the United States Department of Justice based in Washington DC. She returned to the UK in April 2001 from a four-month consultancy at the Australian Institute of Criminology in Canberra to become Founding Director of the UCL Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science. In 2010 she took special leave from UCL to establish the Community Policing and Police Science Institute in Abu Dhabi, UAE. She has now returned to UCL as Professor of Crime Science and is Director of the Commissioned Partnership Research Consortium of eight UK universities supporting the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction.

She was awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours 2008 for services to crime policy.

CHAIR, Policing the future


PRESENTATION TITLE

Crime Recording for the Future

 
Harvey Redgrave  
Harvey-Redgrave  

BIOGRAPHY

Harvey is Director of Strategy at Crest Advisory, the country's leading crime and justice consultancy. Prior to that he spent 4 years as Head of Home Affairs policy at the Labour Party and several years as a Deputy Director of the Prime Minister's Strategy Unit, where he led several reviews on behalf of three separate Prime Ministers.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Changing crime and the implications for policing

 
Professor Mike Hough  
Mike Hough  

BIOGRAPHY

Mike Hough is a Visiting Professor at the School of Law, Birkbeck, University of London and previously University of London Professor of Criminal Policy from 2003 until 2016. He is a member of the Institute for Criminal Policy Research (ICPR), which he founded and directed until his retirement in 2016. ICPR is one of the major UK centres for academic policy research on criminal justice. Mike’s research interests include: procedural justice theory; public perceptions of crime and punishment; crime measurement and crime trends; and sentencing. He has around 250 publications. He was President of the British Society of Criminology from 2008 until 2011.

PRESENTATION TITLE
Policing the future: building trust and retaining legitimacy

 
Professor Paul Ekblom  
Dr Paul Ekblom  

BIOGRAPHY

Paul Ekblom read psychology and gained his PhD at University College London. As a researcher in the UK Home Office for many years, Paul initially worked on crime prevention projects including police truancy patrols, shoplifting, drink and disorder, and crime on the London Underground.  He then orchestrated the industrial-scale evaluation of the Safer Cities Programme, focusing on the impact of residential burglary projects. Final Home Office responsibilities centred on horizon-scanning; advising on Design against Crime (including on Safer Places, the government guide to crime prevention and the planning system, and the Foresight project Cyber Trust and Crime Prevention) and developing the professional discipline and knowledge management of crime prevention.  

Paul has worked internationally with EU Crime Prevention Network, Europol, Council of Europe, Australian Institute of Criminology, Government of Abu Dhabi, and UN. He is currently part-time Professor at the University of the Arts London Research Centre on Design Against Crime, based at Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design; also Visiting Professor at the Applied Criminology Centre, University of Huddersfield, and the Department of Security and Crime Science, UCL. His current work covers design and evaluation of products, places, systems and communications; horizon-scanning, and developing practice-knowledge and process evaluation frameworks for general and cyber crime prevention, community safety, counter-terrorism and problem-oriented policing. These frameworks can be viewed at www.designagainstcrime.com/methodology-resources/crime-frameworks andhttp://5isframework.wordpress.com


CHAIR, Future Crimes

 
Jonathan Geater
 
Jon_Geater  

BIOGRAPHY

Jon Geater is Chief Technology Officer for Thales e-Security where he is responsible for product security and technology strategy, designing technical and cryptographic solutions to meet the ever-changing demands of cyber security threats.

In a career dedicated to high-tech and cryptographic security, Jon has held senior global roles in other leading companies such as nCipher, ARM, and Trustonic. Through these roles, he has designed, built and overseen leading-edge solutions for a wide variety of industries such as mobile, IoT, payments and smart cities and at every level of the technology stack from the fabric of the smallest microchips to the largest cloud systems.


PRESENTATION TITLE

Sin (Smart) City

ABSTRACT

Many crimes are crimes of opportunity, and nothing presents more potential opportunity than the smart cities of the future.

In this talk, Jon will take an attackers-eye-view of the smart city of the future and how this might shape the face of future crime - for better _and_ for worse.

 
Professor Alan Stevens  
Alan Stevens  

BIOGRAPHY

Alan Stevens is Research Director, Transportation at the UK`s Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) where he has been working on the application of new technology for over 25 years. His background is in physics but his recent professional work includes driver behaviour; he holds a PhD in imaging, and in previous research developed machine vision equipment for number-plate reading, digitisation of paper maps and for generating 3-D terrain maps from satellite images. Alan is a Chartered Engineer, Fellow of the Institute of Engineering and Technology and Chair of ITS (UK).

Alan`s main research areas are driver information and assistance systems, cooperative and automated road vehicles and "Human-Machine Interaction" (HMI). He has researched and published on cybersecurity of connected vehicles and in driver behaviour, particularly in relation to the use of new technology.

Alan acts as coordinator for TRL`s PhD students through the Open University, supervises PhD students and participates in University teaching at MSc level.  Having been founding Editor-in-Chief he is now on the Editorial Board of the IET`s international peer-review journal of Intelligent Transport Systems. For over 10 years he was an active member of the international standards committee on Ergonomics Applicable to Road Vehicles. He is also a visiting professor at the University of Southampton.

He has authored more than 120 published articles, reports and papers on Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) including being a co-author of the "European Statement of Principles on Human Machine Interfaces" and editor of a book on driver acceptance of new technology. 

PRESENTATION TITLE
Exploring new vulnerabilities around connected and autonomous road vehicles


ABSTRACT

Vehicles have substantial and increasing computing content, typically containing tens of millions of lines of software code, running on tens of electronics control units interconnected with internal data buses.   Over the next decades there will be vehicles using our roads with vastly varying capabilities in terms of connectivity as well as their degree of automation. This means that there will be a range of new on-vehicle vulnerabilities which could be targets for crime, including extraction of information, download of malware, interference with systems, and control of specific functions. Communications to and between vehicles also presents new opportunities for criminals attempting to prevent, intercept or manipulate information on its way between sender and receiver. Exploitation of such weaknesses in connected vehicles` security may have implications beyond individual vehicles.  This is because connected vehicles can cooperate with other vehicles (e.g. to develop short-headway platoons or to avoid collisions) and cooperate with the road infrastructure (e.g. providing information to traffic lights).  Thus, failure or control of one vehicle could have serious safety impacts on the transport system more widely.

 
Dr Kartikeya Tripathi  
Kartikeya Tripathi  
   

BIOGRAPHY

My research interests lie in applying a mixed-methods approach to investigate questions around crime, security and terrorism. In my work I draw upon my diverse academic background in History, Law, Criminology and Crime Science.

I have worked across a range of topics such as modeling deviation from security procedures by metro rail drivers (for my PhD), quantitative analysis of sexual harassment of women on public transport in India, practices used by police in developing world to geo-locate crime in informal neighbourhoods as well as my current project on cybercrime against the elderly.

I have worked on research projects with various government and private sector organisations both in Europe and Asia, and I am especially interested in applying principles of Crime Science to support capacity building in developing world.

As a Teaching Fellow at University College London I encourage students to use qualitative and quantitative research methods to comprehensively understand crime, its causation and prevention. 

CHAIR, Transport Crime

 
Dr Selina Kolokytha  
Selina Kolokytha  

BIOGRAPHY

Selina is currently a Research Scientist at EMPA, the  Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology in the department of X-Ray Analytics. She successfully completed her doctorate at UCL in 2015 in conjunction with the 3 departments of:  Security & Crime Science, Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering, and Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering. Her expertise in Radiation Physics and Imaging has been internationally recognised, published, and presented. She also holds deep interest and experience within science teaching, particularly in Higher Education, and became Associate Fellow of the Higher Education Academic in 2014. Aside her expanding knowledge and experience based skills; the attributes of an enthusiastic and ambitious young scientist are what drive her. Within IEEE, she has obtained positions at IEEE International School of Imaging, IEEE Imaging Systems and Techniques, and TC-19 Technical Committee member of Imaging Measurements and Systems.

PRESENTATION TITLE

The future of border control

ABSTRACT

Aviation security, and specifically the protection of airports and aircrafts from terrorism and smuggling, has undergone significant development in recent years. During 2015, a record total of 37.6 million commercial flights worldwide, carrying 3.5 billion passengers was reported. In addition, aviation activity, in terms of annual commercial flights, is reportedly growing at a rate of 3-5% per year. Clearly, the demand for security in movement of passengers' accompanying baggage is enormous and growing. This talk primarily focuses on baggage inspection: the methods used for the detection of explosives and illicit materials, with the purpose of prohibiting the illegal movement of goods and dangerous items. The systems and methods currently being used for these purposes internationally will be discussed, along with the related challenges that this discipline faces such as evolving threats, the human factor of inspector officers. Future ideas will be triggered for progresses in this sector, such as combined intelligence of security methods, and advanced technological developments.

 
 Siwan Hayward  
Siwan Hayward  

BIOGRAPHY

Siwan Hayward has worked at Transport for London for ten years as the Head of Transport Policing and Community Safety. She is responsible for managing TfL's £130million investment in Policing Services to deliver safe, secure and reliable journeys in the Capital. 

During her time at TfL she has spear-headed a number of ground breaking initiatives in community safety, including the award winning Project Guardian (#Report it to Stop it) a multi strand campaign to eliminate unwanted sexual behaviour on public transport; safeguarding for vulnerable adult and children; work on hate crime (We stand Together); targeted work to improve road safety such as the London Freight Enforcement Partnership which tackles criminal elements within the heavy good vehicle sector; the MPS Cycle Task Force dedicated to cyclists safety in London and Safer Travel at Night, tackling illegal taxis and minicabs. 

Before working at TfL Siwan worked for the Mayor of London, on policing and prior to that on urban social policy considering how cities address the problems of rough sleeping and drug and alcohol use. She has also worked for the National Health Service and local government, and started her career as a campaigner for human rights. 

PRESENTATION TITLE

How Transport for London is responding to challenges of a changing crime and security landscape

ABSTRACT

London is one of the greatest cities in the world, diverse, prosperous and dynamic. Everyday more than 31 million journeys are made across the capital.  The city is growing  â€“  by nine new residents every hour (that’s the equivalent of two full double decker buses arriving every day) – and changing, as patterns of work and play evolve spurred on by new technologies and opportunities. Transport for London is charged by the Mayor with the responsibility for making every journey feel safe and secure. This talk will describe how TfL work with partners to keep Londoners safe as they travel around the capital, and how TfL is responding to new challenges, from disruptive technology to terror threats.

 
David Pérez Esparza  
David Perez Esparza  

BIOGRAPHY

David Pérez Esparza holds a Master in Public Policy (EGAP School of Government), a Master in Crime Science (UCL), and a Master in Political Economy and Conflict Resolution (University of Essex). David has co-authored and co-edited four books on security and crime, and has worked as Consultant to a number of police forces. He is a founding member of the UCL Organised Crime Research Network (UCL-OCRN) and coordinates the Think-tank #PropuestaMx. Currently, David is completing his PhD on the prediction of illegal gun trafficking and gun-related violence at UCL.

CHAIR, Gun violence – the hidden bomb

 
Peter Squires  
Peter Squires  

BIOGRAPHY

Professor of Criminology and Public Policy since 2005 at the University of Brighton.  Interested in policing, youth crime, gangs and anti-social behaviour but have been researching gun crime and firearms control since 1994.  Two books: Gun Culture or Gun Control (Routledge, 2000), Gun Crime in Global Contexts (Routledge, 2014) published on these issues.

PRESENTATION TITLE
Illegal firearms: supply and demand, technologies and cultures 

ABSTRACT

This talk aims to explore some of the several dilemmas of European firearm trafficking security, including incompatibilities of ballistics intelligence procurement and weapon-tracing systems, inter-agency discrepancies, inadequate resourcing, contrasting jurisdictional cultures and priorities, and inadequate fast-parcel and cargo scanning technologies – not to mention the familiar low-level ‘ant-trade entrepreneurs’, the ‘cottage industry converters’  and the vagaries of domestic firearm licensing.

 
David W. Dyson  
David Dyson  

BIOGRAPHY

Involved with firearms for over 40 years, now acting as a consultant and expert witness. Master of Laws degree in Firearms Legislation in the U.K.

PRESENTATION TITLE 

Changing Trends in the Types of Firearms Used by Criminals

ABSTRACT

Over the years different types of weapons become more, or less prevalent in crime. This talk briefly considers the type of weapons identified, and their sources.

 
Joanne Chilton  
Joanne Chilton  

BIOGRAPHY

Detective Chief Superintendent Jo Chilton – Head of NABIS 

Detective Chief Superintendent Jo Chilton has worked for West Midlands Police for the whole of her police service. She joined the force in 1989, during her service Jo has spent time working in Child Protection as a Police Constable and Detective Inspector, Response Policing, Community Safety, Professional Standards and CID.

Before joining NABIS Jo was a Detective Superintendent in Force CID. In this role she set up the Gangs and Organised Crime Unit (now known as the Serious & Organised Crime Unit) and, for a while, led on the issue of gangs, guns and kidnap for West Midlands Police. Part of this role included running the Communities against Guns, Gangs and Knife crime programme, which was a 2 year Home Office funded project. As the force lead for Kidnap Jo attended the national meetings representing the West Midlands Regional Forces and was involved in drafting guidance as well as running several training events. Whilst Head of the Gangs and Organised Crime Unit Jo also had responsibility for the Economic Crime Unit.

 Jo spent time as the Deputy Head of Force CID with responsibility for the Coroners Officers, Service Transformation and had the force lead on Drugs. After a few months as acting Head of Force CID Jo took over the newly formed Violence Investigation teams, before joining NABIS in December 2014 as Head of Unit.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Understanding the Criminal Use of Firearms in the UK

ABSTRACT

NABIS provide fast time ballistic intelligence to Police and Law Enforcement in the UK. This intelligence is used to tackle the criminal use of firearms. The talk will give an overview of the current threat picture of firearms used in the UK and the work of NABIS. 

 
Lewis D. Griffin  
Lewis Griffin  

BIOGRAPHY

Lewis D. Griffin received the BA (honors) degree in Mathematics and Philosophy from Oxford University, United Kingdom, in 1988, and the PhD degree from the University of London in 1995 for a thesis “Descriptions of Image Structure” in the area of computational vision. Following positions at Aston University (Vision Sciences) and Kings College London (Imaging Sciences) he has been at University College London (Computer Science) since 2005, where is now a Reader. His research interests include image structure, color vision, machine learning and biomedical modelling, with applications in security science, biomedicine and geoscience.

PRESENTATION TITLE

AI technology for firearms security


ABSTRACT

I will describe how recent advances in Machine Learning methods, in particular Deep Learning, allow creation of computer algorithms that can recognize firearms in X-ray or CCTV images with super-human levels of performance.

 
Professor Ruth Morgan  
Ruth Morgan  

BIOGRAPHY

Ruth joined UCL in 2007 having completed a D.Phil in Forensic Geoscience at the University of Oxford. Her research is focussed around the role of physical evidence in the detection of crime.  Current research interests include establishing the evidence dynamics, transfer and persistence of geoforensic materials (soil, sediment, pollen etc.), and research that contributes to the production of guidelines for the practice of forensic geoscience. Recent work has concentrated on developing forensic applications of Scanning Electron Microscopy in the analysis of quartz grain surface textures.  Her research has been presented at a number of international conferences and appeared in New Scientist and the press. 

Ruth is the Director of the UCL Centre for the Forensic Sciences.  The Centre seeks to facilitate a network of UCL academics from a wide range of different disciplines and departments to enable a strategic and multidisciplinary research programme in collaboration with external partners and forensic science stakeholders.

She is a member of a number of committees including the London Geological Society Forensic Geoscience Group, the UK Forensic Science Education Group and a member of the Advisory Board of Inside Justice. She is also a reviewer for forensic geoscience submissions for a number of internationally peer reviewed journals.

Current collaborators include Dr Lewis Griffin (UCL Computer Science), Dr Peter Bull (University of Oxford), Dr Melanie Webb (University of Surrey), Dr James Robertson (University of Canberra), Dr Lorna Dawson (Macaulay Institute), Dr James Riding (British Geological Survey).

CHAIR, Future Forensic Science

 
Dr Randall Murch  
Randall Murc  

BIOGRAPHY

Randall Murch, Ph.D. has been a Professor of Practice at Virginia Tech University, USA, since December, 2004. His current funded research activities are focused advanced forensic science, biosecurity, chemical and biological defense, microbial forensics and cyberbiosecurity. From 1980 – 2002, he with the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), where he was a Special Agent and Senior Executive. He was assigned to three field offices, the FBI Laboratory, Operational Technology (engineering) program in various capacities. In 1996, he created the original program for the forensic investigation of WMD threats and events which also established or matured new fields of nuclear, chemical and biological (microbial) weapons forensics and associated programs in several U.S. Government organizations. He has published and presented extensively in the field of microbial forensics. Throughout his career, he has been involved in outreach regarding science, technology and security. He also has extensive experience as a member of U.S. National Academies standing and study committees, including those addressing high impact forensic issues. Murch has BS, MS and PhD degrees in the Life Sciences.

 

PRESENTATION TITLE

Microbial Forensics and Cyberbiosecurity, The Two Could Be Connected

ABSTRACT

Microbial forensics is a field which emerged from the creation in 1996 of the first-ever national program in the U.S. for the forensic investigation of bioterrorism, biowarfare, bioproliferation and the illicit use of legitimate science. Since then the discipline has made significant strides  and is maturing, yet scientific and other challenges remain. Further, like any forensic discipline, microbial forensics must meet legal expectations and provide investigative value. Additionally, it also must provide support and guide other activities and decisions that are not of a traditional investigative and legal nature. Cyberbiosecuity is a new venture that sits at the interface of biosecurity and cybersecurity which is being initiated to protect biomanufacturing, particularly of critical medical products such as vaccines and therapeutics. It is possible that traditional forensic sciences and microbial forensics could be leveraged during investigations for which a biomanufacturing facility has been compromised in some critical manner.

 
Joseph Hoy  

Joseph Hoy
 

BIOGRAPHY

Joe has a background in telecoms engineering and training. Gaining experience initially as an IT and telecoms engineer with BT, NCR and AT&T, Joe moved across to cellular telecoms and worked on a variety of engineering and training projects for Nokia around the world. 

He has also worked as a cell site analyst and expert witness and has compiled many forensic reports for a variety of police forces and agencies and has presented them in a range of courts, including the Old Bailey. He is the author of "Forensic Radio Survey Techniques for Cell Site Analysis" (Joseph Hoy, Wiley 2015) and is a member of the Forensic Science Regulator`s cell site analysis best practice working group.

Joe is Managing Director of Forensic Analytics and helps shape the development of our products.

PRESENTATION TITLE

The Near Future of Cell Site Analysis

ABSTRACT

Communications data and cell site analysis have become an indispensable staple of modern investigations. Law enforcement agencies have become used to the idea that comms data can help them to determine who suspects have been in contact with and where they were at the time. Advances in communications networks are making new services available, such as 4G VoLTE calls and WiFi Calling, which offer users a wider range of calling options and better reliability for those calls. These services also offer new types of communications data, which offer the promise of providing 'mid-session' cell location details. At the same time, a greater proportion of call activity is moving away from traditional voice/SMS methods and towards Internet-based services such as WhatsApp and Face Time and therefore no longer show up in 'normal' call records. This means that billing records are becoming less useful at precisely the same time that are becoming more detailed. This talk attempts to outline the problem that this will cause and the potential solutions that investigators can employ.

 
Richard Berry  
Richard Berry  

BIOGRAPHY

Richard is a serving chief officer and is the National Policing Lead for Communications Data (CD) and Digital Investigations and Intelligence.  He took the point role for presenting the policing case for the 2016 Investigatory Powers Act.   He leads the National Data Communications Group and chairs the multi-sector CD Professional Oversight Board (POB).  The POB was established as a response to the findings of the Interception Commissioner`s report on intrusion into journalistic sources, which had been commissioned by the Prime Minister. Richard co-chairs the CD Strategy Group with national communications services providers.  He has developed a national digital research collaboration and established the Independent Digital Ethics Panel for Policing (IDEPP).      

Previous experience includes homicide, organised crime and interagency anti-corruption investigations.   Richard was national coordinator for the UK Pentameter2 operation against human sex-trafficking where 528 arrests, led to the recovery of 167 victims, of whom 14 were children.  He has worked globally, including with a United Nations project, Europol and the US Department of Justice.  He has been a guest lecturer at the Estonian Security Sciences Academy.  Richard worked as a professional advisor on specialist security for the London 2012 Olympics.  He is a national extreme-threat firearms commander and has strategic command experience of unique policing events such as the Badger Cull and a number of cyber-attack events. 


PRESENTATION TITLE

Digital Investigation and Intelligence (DII) in Disrupted Times

ABSTRACT

The 2016 Investigatory Powers Act was the most heavily scrutinised legislation in decades. The World Economic Forum highlights that the 4th industrial revolution is underway whilst austerity still impacts. Cyber-crime represents about half of all crime in the UK.  This presentation will outline DII progress and direction with a focus on addressing future crimes.  

 
Dr Gianluca Stringhini  
Gianluca Stringhini 2017  

BIOGRAPHY

Dr Gianluca Stringhini is a lecturer in the Departments of Computer Science and Security and Crime Science at UCL . His research interests include cybercrime, network security, social network security, web security, and malware analysis. His work was awarded a Best Paper Award at ACSAC in 2010 and a Symantec Research Labs Graduate Fellowship in 2012. Dr Stringhini holds a PhD from UC Santa Barbara, and his thesis work received the Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Department of Computer Science at UCSB in 2014

CHAIR, Cybercrime

 
Dr Daniel Thomas  
Daniel Thomas  

BIOGRAPHY

Daniel R. Thomas completed his undergraduate and PhD degrees at the University of Cambridge. His PhD work explored security metrics for computer systems, including an analysis of the vulnerabilities in the Android platform. In 2015 he started work at the Cambridge Cybercrime Centre. Daniel's research interests are in protecting end users from security problems through large scale data analysis, good code and secure protocols.

PRESENTATION TITLE

1000 days of UDP amplification DDoS attacks


ABSTRACT

Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks employing reflected UDP amplification are regularly used to disrupt networks and systems. The amplification allows one rented server to generate significant volumes of data, while the reflection hides the identity of the attacker. Consequently this is an attractive, low risk, strategy for criminals bent on vandalism and extortion. To measure the uptake of this strategy we analyse the results of running a network of honeypot UDP reflectors (median size 65 nodes) from July 2014 onwards. We explore the life cycle of attacks that use our reflectors, from the scanning phase used to detect our honeypot machines, through to their use in attacks. We see a median of 1450 malicious scanners per day across all UDP protocols, and have recorded details of 5.18 million subsequent attacks involving in excess of 3.31 trillion packets. Using a capture-recapture statistical technique, we estimate that our reflectors can see between 85.1% and 96.6% of UDP reflection attacks over our measurement period.

 
Cerys Bradley  
Cerys Bradley  

BIOGRAPHY

I am a PhD student in the Crime and Security Department. I have a BSc in Mathematics and MRes in Crime and Security Science. My research focuses on Dark Net Marketplaces and law enforcement approaches to cybercrime.

PRESENTATION TITLE
Studying Drug Vendors on the Dark Net

ABSTRACT

Since the rise and fall of the marketplace Silk Road, dozens of Dark Net Markets (DNMs) have been created to facilitate the sale of illegal items. These DNMs have been populated by thousands of vendors whose sales strategies have evolved with the overall ecosystem. This talk will discuss what studying DNM vendors can tell us about the overall ecosystem and how law enforcement may be best able to challenge it. 

 
Steve Welsh  
Steve Welsh  

BIOGRAPHY

Steve Welsh is a Senior Manager at the National Crime Agency (NCA) in the UK that was formed in the on 3rd October 2013, succeeding the Serious Organised Crime Agency to lead the UK’s fight to cut serious and organized crime. 

Steve is the head of the Behavioural Science & Disruption department in Commodities division of the Intelligence Command within the NCA. Steve’s work includes exploring how psychology and social science may be applied in designing and delivering innovative and proactive evidenced based interventions to disrupt and fragment organized crime networks. Its remit encompasses cyber enabled serious crime and include the Dark Net dimension to that threat.

Steve was originally a police officer initially serving in the Metropolitan Police Service. In his 30 years in UK policing he served predominantly as a detective specialising in combating organised crime in proactive covert investigations. 

Whilst a police officer Steve was one of the multi-agency team that designed and produced the original National Intelligence Model for UK Law Enforcement. Steve concluded his police service as a Detective Superintendent with the National Crime Squad (NCS) before transferring in to SOCA in 2006 where he managed projects delivering non traditional and innovative responses to organized crime.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Tails of the Dark Net


ABSTRACT

The talk will concern challenges and issues in countering the global threats posed by serious and organised crime in Dark Net cryptomarkets hosted on Tor.

CHAIR, CLOSING PANEL DISCUSSION

 
Dr Kevin Chetty  
Kevin Chetty  

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Kevin Chetty is a Senior Lecturer in the UCL Department of Security and Crime Science (SCS) and the Deputy Director of the UCL Centre for Security Technology (CST). He joined SCS in November 2009 from the UCL Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering. Kevin Undertook his PhD in medical physics at Imperial College London where he investigated new strategies to improve the diagnostic capabilities of gas microbubbles which are used in medical ultrasound imaging. Kevin received a Bachelors degree in Phyics from Kings College London in 1999, and a Master degree in Image and X-Ray Physics from the same university.

CHAIR, Security technology 2050

 
Dr Amin Amiri  
aminamari2017  
BIOGRAPHY
Dr Amin Amiri is a research associate in the sensors and circuit group at University College London (UCL). He graduated from UCL in 2010 with masters of engineering in electronic engineering with communications engineering and completed an integrated doctoral programme in 2016. His Ph.D., funded by EPSRC was on ground penetrating radar for detection of Landmines and IEDs. His research interests include ground and ice penetrating radars, ultrawide band antennas and radar systems and microwave imaging.

CO-CHAIR, Security technology 2050
 
Dr Christopher Wyatt  

BIOGRAPHY

Chris has a background in International history and politics, and wrote Afghanistan in the Defence of Empire, published by IB Tauris. Chris has taught International History and International Politics at the Universities of Leeds and Reading and has also worked for several non-departmental public bodies, including the Economic and Social Research Council. He is a Research Fellow at the University of Birmingham and has worked on an ESRC-funded award on The Political Effects of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles on Conflict and Cooperation Within and Between States and a Gerda Henkel Stiftung-funded award on the Nefarious Use of Drones. He assisted in the work of the sixth University of Birmingham Policy Commission on the Security Impact of Unmanned and Remote-Piloted Systems and is also interested in terrorism, insurgency and military and security issues more generally. 

PRESENTATION TITLE

Nefarious Criminal and Terrorist Uses of Drones

ABSTRACT
When most people think about drones, they think about Reapers in Pakistan or they think about Amazon delivering packages to their property. The application that appears quite low down the list is criminal and terrorist use. Yet the nefarious uses of drones is a real problem and is likely to become worse over time. Some criminal use is the work of naïve hobbyists but others, from criminals smuggling drugs into prisons to potential terrorist use, are more significant. The greatest concern emerging is the terrorist use of drones. Traditional approaches to target hardening require revision and it is only a matter of time until someone tries to use a drone to attack critical national infrastructure or crowded places in general. Migration of method by terrorists from places like Mosul needs to be taken seriously and law enforcement is alive to the threat. Other uses of drones can be nefarious without being kinetic, so criminal and terrorist use of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) is another area of interest to law enforcement. The research informing this paper comes from a Gerda Henkel Stiftung-funded award on the Nefarious Criminal and Terrorist Uses of Drones and findings from it relate to questions of vulnerability and risk that drone use generates. Integral to this is the interrogation of data to seek the reduction of epistemic uncertainty regarding the nefarious use of this disruptive technology.

 
Professor Nabil Aouf  
Nabil Aouf  
   

BIOGRAPHY

Nabil received his PhD from the Department of Electrical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada, in 2002. He has been a scientist for National Research Council Canada and also an Adjunct Assistant Professor with Concordia University, Canada. Nabil is leading the autonomy, imaging and sensor fusion theme of research and is currently heading the Signal and Autonomy Group. He is also the research lead of the Centre of Electronic Warfare and Information Cyber (CEWIC) and a founding member of the CDS research forum defining the CDS research strategy.

Nabil is an Associate Editor of the International Journal of Distributed Sensor Networks, the International Journal of Computational Intelligence in Control and the Imaging Science Journal.

PRESENTATION TITLE

GPS Denied UAV Navigation and Tracking/Recognition : A vision Based Approach

ABSTRACT

There is a lot interest in using UAVs for the Defense and Security sector these later years. The applications these platforms are use for differ from improving situational awareness to detection and recognition of threats. All these operations are usually run in a hostile environment where GPS signals are often jammed or simply not available as in the case of urban kind of environments. To improve the level of Autonomy of these machines, intelligence in terms of efficient algorithms providing GPS denied localization for these UAVs while keeping the level of performance in terms of automatic target recognition to its best is critical to have. Such algorithms, which are, based on exterioceptive imaging sensors, will be detailed in this talk.

 
Gareth Howells  
Gareth Howells  
BIOGRAPHY
Dr. Gareth Howells is a Reader in Secure Electronic Systems at the University of Kent, UK and Founder and Director of Metrarc Ltd, a joint spin-out company of the Universities of Kent and Essex in the UK. He has been involved in research relating to security, biometrics and pattern classification techniques for over twenty five years and has been instrumental in the development of novel ICMetric based security technology deriving secure encryption keys from the operating characteristics of digital systems. He has been awarded, either individually or jointly, many major research grants relating to the pattern classification and security fields, publishing over 190 papers in the technical literature. Recent work has been directed towards the development of secure device authentication systems which is currently in the process of being commercially exploited.

PRESENTATION TITLE
Exploring alternative approaches to device Identification with ICMetrics

ABSTRACT
The digital revolution has transformed the way we create, destroy, share, process and manage information. However, such technology has also increased the opportunities for fraud and other related crimes to be committed. Therefore, as the adoption of such technologies expands, it becomes vital to ensure the integrity and authenticity of electronic digital systems and to manage, control access to and verify their identity. ICMetrics represents an exciting new approach for generating unique identifiers for embedded electronic devices and online services based on their determinable operating characteristics and associated user behavioural and biometric characteristics. However, such a technology presents significant challenges in generating a robust and flexible system with sufficient entropy to operate in a practical environment. This talk introduces the technical challenges associated with ICMetric technology and explores some of the practical considerations associated with its successful commercial exploitation.
 
Sanaz Zolghadriha  
Sanaz Zolghadriha  
BIOGRAPHY
Sanaz Zolghadriha is the founder of the UCL Organised Crime Research Network, which she runs together with her fellow PhD colleagues. Prior to joining UCL, Ms Zolghadriha worked in the field of clinical and forensic psychology, both in academic and clinical settings. As a final year PhD at the UCL Department of Security and Crime Science, Ms Zolghadriha is currently applying her background in forensic psychology to her research on the investigation of transnational organised crime networks. Her PhD has led her to present at conferences, hold workshops for law enforcement, and consult practitioners on issues of transnational organised crime. 

CHAIR, OCRN
 
Supervisory Special Agent and Special Agent, FBI Cyber Behavioural Unit  
PRESENTATION TITLE
Digital Criminalistics at the FBI

ABSTRACT
The Digital Behavioral Criminalistics Cell (DBCC) is charged with the mission of extrapolating human behavior and cognitive processes from digital evidence. The discussion will detail the future of merging traditional violent crime with digital/cyber crime scene recreation, and application of forensic techniques and principles to distill the vital human behavioral patterns in every crime.
Multiple case studies will frame and guide an interactive discussion on this burgeoning subject matter. 
 
Dr Jamie Saunders  
Jamie Saunders  

BIOGRAPHY

Jamie Saunders is a Director at the UK’s National Crime Agency (NCA).

NCA was established in 2013 to lead and coordinate the UK’s fight against serious and organised crime.

Jamie was recruited into NCA in 2014 to lead the Agency’s work against cybercrime.  In 2016, he took on responsibility for the Agency’s intelligence mission.

Prior to joining NCA, Jamie held a variety of operational and policy roles in UK Government, including Director of International Cyber Policy at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (2012-2014), and lead for Cyber Policy at the British Embassy in Washington (2008-2011).

PRESENTATION TITLE

Criminal use of technology: tackling the challenges, embracing the opportunities


ABSTRACT

Changes in the way that criminals use technology create significant challenges Law Enforcement, but technology also provides opportunities for Law Enforcement, business, academics and other non-governmental organizations, and the public to work together in new ways to detect and prevent crime. I will provide an overview of these challenges and opportunities, and highlight a number of ways in which we can work together to turn technology to our collective advantage in reducing harm.

 
NICK ROSS  
Nick Ross  

Nick Ross is a psychologist by background and British broadcaster who worked extensively with the police, has campaigned for evidence-based public policy and has been a member of several UK government committees. He conceived the term crime science and inspired the Jill Dando Institute at UCL where he is a visiting professor and chairs the external advisory board.

PANEL MEMBER, CLOSING PANEL

 

Page last modified on 24 mar 17 12:32