International Crime Science Conference

Nick Ross Chairing

16 July 2015, British Library, LONDON

This year the 9th International Crime Science Conference will focus on “Science and Security: the application of scientific method to the most pressing crime and security problems of today”. The conference will take place on 16th July 2015 at the British Library in London. The International Crime Science Conference will focus on how techniques, methodologies and technologies from across the physical and social sciences spectrum are being used to tackle some of the most pressing crime and security concerns facing today’s societies. Topics covered will include cyber crime operations; preventing and mitigating extremism; knife and gun crime; advances in sensing for security applications, post-blast explosives detection; money laundering in the Information Age; tackling modern slavery; human trafficking; new approaches in forensic evidence detection and interpretation.

The conference, which has enjoyed consistently high approval ratings from delegates over the past eight years, brings together senior security practitioners, policy-makers, technologists, and academics, all developing the latest techniques and technologies for preventing crime and increasing security. The conference is supported by the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction at the College of Policing.

Registration for the International Crime Science conference can be accessed via this link.


Registration costs

  • Early bird rate:   £199
  • Concessionary Rate (Probationary police officers, UCL and non-UCL students and UCL Staff only):   £99
  • Speakers and invited guests - Use the code provided by the administrator


To book please click on this link.

Speakers and abstracts

 
Professor Gloria Laycock, OBE
 
Gloria Laycock  

BIOGRAPHY

Gloria Laycock graduated in psychology from University College London in 1968 and completed her PhD at UCL in 1975. She worked in the Home Office for over thirty years of which almost twenty years were spent on research and development in the policing and crime prevention fields. She has extensive research experience in the UK and has acted as a consultant and trainer on policing and crime prevention in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand, Israel, India, South Africa and the Middle East.

In 1999 she was awarded an International Visiting Fellowship by the United States Department of Justice based in Washington DC. She returned to the UK in April 2001 from a four-month consultancy at the Australian Institute of Criminology in Canberra to become Founding Director of the UCL Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science. In 2010 she took special leave from UCL to establish the Community Policing and Police Science Institute in Abu Dhabi, UAE. She has now returned to UCL as Professor of Crime Science and is Director of the Commissioned Partnership Research Consortium of eight UK universities supporting the What Works Centre for Crime Reduction.

She was awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours 2008 for services to crime policy.

SESSION TITLE

What works in Crime Reduction – Systematic Reviews

ABSTRACT

This session will describe the results of some of the systematic reviews now completed as part of the 'What Works in Crime Reduction' research programme. it will cover aspects of domestic violence, knife crime and alley gating. Some theoretical and procedural issues will be raised for discussion.

 
 Professor Chris Hankin

 
Chris Hankin  

BIOGRAPHY

Professor Hankin joined Imperial in 1984 and was promoted to Professor in 1995. He is Director of the Institute for Security Science and Technology. His research is in theoretical computer science and cyber security. He leads multidisciplinary projects focussed on developing advanced visual analytics and providing better decision support to defend against cyber attacks. He is Director of the CPNI/EPSRC Research Institute on Trustworthy Industrial Control Systems. He is immediate past President of the Scientific Council of INRIA, the French national institute for research in computer science and control, and Vice Chair of the DG CONNECT Advisory Forum for the European Commission.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Data Analytics and Sense-Making

ABSTRACT

The talk will review the techniques for extracting information from data that we have developed over a number of years.  We will also highlight some of the challenges faced by academics — particularly when working in support of crime-fighting and security analysts.  We will conclude with some future directions.

 
 Aiden Sidebottom
 
Aiden Sidebottom  

 BIOGRAPHY

Aiden Sidebottom is a lecturer in the Department of Security and Crime Science at University College London. His main research interests are crime prevention evaluation and problem-oriented policing. Recent research has focused on methods of synthesising research evidence to better inform crime prevention policy and practice, undertaken in collaboration with the UK College of Policing. He has published over 30 articles in journals such as Criminology and Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Gating alleys to reduce crime: A meta-analysis and realist synthesis

ABSTRACT

Alley gates are a widespread burglary reduction measure in the UK. This paper will describe the mixed methods approach taken to systematically review the evidence on alley gating as a crime reduction method. The results of and difficulties encountered in carrying out such a review will be discussed.

 
Ben Buchanan
 
Ben Buchanan  

BIOGRAPHY
Ben Buchanan is a PhD candidate at King's College London in the Department of War Studies. His thesis examines the intersection of cybersecurity and national strategy. Additionally, Ben has published journal articles on cyber deterrence and on attributing cyber attacks. Prior to coming to King's, he served in a variety of roles in policing, software design, counterterrorism, and pre-hospital care. He is a certified computer forensic analyst and a Marshall Scholar.

PRESENTATION TITLE

Attributing Cyber Attacks

ABSTRACT

Who did it? Attribution is fundamental. Human lives and the security of the state may depend on ascribing agency to an agent. In the context of computer network intrusions, attribution is commonly seen as one of the most intractable technical problems, as either solvable or not solvable, and as dependent mainly on the available forensic evidence. But is it? Is this a productive understanding of attribution? — This article argues that attribution is what states make of it. To show how, we introduce the Q Model: designed to explain, guide, and improve the making of attribution. Matching an offender to an offence is an exercise in minimising uncertainty on three levels: tactically, attribution is an art as well as a science; operationally, attribution is a nuanced process not a black-and-white problem; and strategically, attribution is a function of what is at stake politically. Successful attribution requires a range of skills on all levels, careful management, time, leadership, stress-testing, prudent communication, and recognising limitations and challenges.

 
Alex Gibberd
 
Alex Gibberd  

BIOGRAPHY

Alex Gibberd is a PhD student at University College London, supervised by Dr James Nelson (UCL Statistics) he is hosted within both the Statistical Science and Security and Crime Science departments. Funded by the UK Defence Science Technology Laboratory (DSTL), his research focuses on understanding multivariate time-series data with applications to anomaly detection within computer networks. He currently holds an MPhys degree in Astrophysics (St-Andrews), and MRes in Security Science (UCL).

PRESENTATION TITLE

Data-Science for Security and Intelligence

ABSTRACT

The complex and often large data-sets provided by modern big-data strategies require analytic tools in order to provide insight. In this session we consider how information extraction methods are developed from both academic and industrial settings. After introducing examples, we discuss some implications of using such methods in security applications. For example: How do we obtain pragmatic intelligence from analytic methods? How do we understand the bias of our methods? How do we balance privacy and intelligence? 

 
Dr Ella Cockbain
 
Ella Cockbain  

BIOGRAPHY

Dr Ella Cockbain is a researcher at UCL whose work focuses on serious and organised crime and its prevention, especially human trafficking, child sexual exploitation and forced labour. She currently holds an ESRC 'Future Research Leaders' Fellowship for a three-year study into labour trafficking, in collaboration with Professor Kate Bowers and the National Crime Agency. Their ongoing research has helped inform counter-trafficking strategy, including through input into the National Threat Group on Human Trafficking, National Policing and the Home Office's Modern Slavery Unit. Ella recently co-edited with J. Knutsson her first book: 'Applied Police Research: Challenges and Opportunities' (Routledge, 2014).

SESSION TITLE

Tackling modern slavery: A focus on human trafficking for labour exploitation

ABSTRACT

Human trafficking and modern slavery continue to move up the national and international threat agenda. Empirical evidence is, however, notoriously scant in this field. In this session, we will bring together a range of practitioner and academic perspectives to share new evidence and insights into the characteristics and challenges of human trafficking. Our particular focus will be on labour trafficking, an increasingly important but often overshadowed form of trafficking.

 
Dr Ruth Morgan  
Ruth Morgan  

BIOGRAPHY

Ruth Morgan (MA (Oxon), D.Phil) is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Security and Crime Science, and the Director of the UCL Centre for the Forensic Sciences.  The Centre facilitates a network of UCL academics from a wide range of different disciplines and departments to enable a strategic and multidisciplinary research programme in collaboration with external partners and forensic science stakeholders.

Ruth's research group is focused around the role of physical evidence in the detection of crime and concerns the interpretation of forensic evidence and intelligence.  The research falls into two main areas; evidence dynamics and the interpretation of evidence.  The group is actively seeking to establish empirical evidence bases for understanding the evidence dynamics of trace evidence (soil, sediment, pollen, DNA, gun-shot residue, explosives etc.).  It is also conducting research that addresses the need to develop our understanding of decision-making and the interaction of multiple variables in crime investigation and detection to develop an evidence base to enhance our ability to interpret the analysis of forensic materials more effectively, in order to generate valuable and robust intelligence and evidence.

Ruth serves on a number of national committees, is the Vice Chair of the London Geological Society Forensic Geoscience Group, sits on the editorial board for the journal 'Medicine, Science and the Law', and is a member of the Advisory Board of Inside Justice. She was part of the group that put together the QAA benchmark statement for Forensic Science and acts as External Examiner for a number of UK Universities.  She is also a reviewer for forensic geoscience submissions for a number of internationally peer reviewed journals.

SESSION TITLE

New Approaches in Forensic Evidence Detection and Interpretation

ABSTRACT

This session will offer the opportunity to consider and discuss some of the cutting edge themes within the field of forensic science.  The development of new technologies that can offer analysis at ever increasing levels of resolution has transformed the analysis of forensic evidence, yet the development of approaches that enable the most accurate and transparent frameworks for evidence interpretation is still crucial.  Recent advances in the forensic sciences will be considered and the implications for forensic intelligence and evidence will be explored.

 
Dr Phil Edwards
 
Phil Edwards  

BIOGRAPHY

Phil Edwards BSc PhD is a Senior Lecturer in Statistics in the Cochrane Injuries Group, and Head of the Department of Population Health at LSHTM, University of London. His research interests are in injury prevention, transport and health

PRESENTATION TITLE

Mediation, mentoring and peer-support to reduce youth violence: a systematic review

ABSTRACT

Public health approaches that address attitudinal causes of youth violence, and that intervene early on with at-risk youth, may be effective at reducing youth violence. The results of a systematic review of the effects of mentoring, mediation or peer-support interventions to reduce youth violence will be presented.

 
Dr Marco Cova
 
Marco Cova  

BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Marco Cova is a senior security researcher and a member of the founding team of Lastline, a company providing anti-malware and breach detection solutions. Before defecting to the industry, he was a Lecturer in Computer Security with the School of Computer Science, University of Birmingham. He has received his PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Marco's research interests include most areas of systems security, with an emphasis on web-based malware analysis and detection, botnets, and vulnerability analysis. He has published more than 25 papers on these topics in leading conferences and journals. He has also led the design and development of Wepawet, a publicly-available service for the analysis of malicious web pages, which are commonly used in cybercriminal operations.

 
Professor Richard Wortley
 
richard-wortley  
BIOGRAPHY

Richard Wortley is Director of the Jill Dando Institute at UCL, Head of the Department of Security and Crime Science at UCL and Director of the SECReT Doctoral Training Centre.  He has a PhD in psychology, and worked as a prison psychologist for ten years before moving to academia. He was head of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University (Australia) for 9 years, and is a past national Chair of the Australian Psychological Society’s College of Forensic Psychologists. His research interests centre on environmental criminology and situational crime prevention. In recent years his research has been particularly concerned with the role that immediate environments play in facilitating child sexual abuse. He has been a chief investigator on 8 national competitive grants in Australia with total finding of around $Aus2 million.
 
Nick Ross
 
Ross image  

BIOGRAPHY

Nick Ross is a British broadcaster and journalist who for many years presented the BBC crime appeals show Crimewatch and helped establish the UCL Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science where he is chairman of the Board and a visiting professor. He is a psychologist by background and a campaigner for evidence-based policy and author of ‘Crime: how to solve it and why almost everything we’re told is wrong’.

(The book was launched at 2013's conference.)

 

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