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COMMENTS 

How come “intolerant” Poland is among European leaders in collecting data on hate crimes?

In Poland over the past ten years, there has been a creeping recognition of the need to combat hate crime. While intolerance remains an issue in this Central European country, developments in in the official response to targeted violence are evident. Nevertheless, it is unclear what motivated the authorities to address this issue. Piotr Godzisz, PhD candidate at UCL SSEES, explores what explains Poland’s leadership in this regard.
14 January 2016
Piotr Godzisz More...

Starts: Jan 14, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Maps in Films: the View from Ealing

In the website The Cine-Tourist, Roland-François Lack, Senior Lecturer in UCL’s Department of French, has created a repository for his research around cinema and place. Here he illustrates some connections between maps and films.
1 February 2016
Roland-François Lack More...

Starts: Feb 4, 2016 12:00:00 AM

How ISIS Rule and Mobilisation Matters for the Military Response to the Paris Attacks

Kristin Bakke, Senior Lecturer in Political Science looks at how air strikes may affect ISIS, given how ISIS rules and how it mobilises support and recruits fighters. Although air strikes might contribute to containing the group and its ability to rule, it is likely to fuel the narrative that fosters mobilisation. To the degree that there is a case for a military response against ISIS, it is, by itself, insufficient. More...

Starts: Dec 16, 2015 12:00:00 AM

European Film Salons - Portraying Perpetrators: I was a Slave Labourer

Publication date: Nov 13, 2013 04:48 PM

Start: Jun 16, 2014 12:00 AM

16 June 2014
Made for the BBC, arte-France and the Westdeutscher Rundfunk, this documentary is the inside story of an international campaign of former slave labourers, which director Luke Holland helped to initiate. The director will attend the screening.


When:
16 June 2014
7.00pm

Where:
Garwood Lecture Theatre
South Wing

slave labourer

Rudy Kennedy. Still from the film “I Was a Slave Labourer” (1999). © WDR

 

I was a Slave Labourer
(dir. Luke Holland, 74min, UK, 1999)

Made for the BBC's award-winning Storyville strand, arte-France and the
Westdeutscher Rundfunk, 'I Was a Slave Labourer' (74 minutes) is the inside
story of the international campaign, which Luke Holland helped to initiate,
and which ultimately secured $5 billion for over a million, former, forced
and slave labourers. Key protagonists in this dramatic yet intimate account,
are survivors and former slave labourers, Rudy Kennedy and Roman Halter. The
film, broadcast across Europe in the weeks preceding the final settlement,
is credited with contributing to the success of the campaign for belated
justice.

'I Was a Slave Labourer' has travelled internationally, including
screenings to mark Yom Hashoa in Israel; at The Imperial War Museum, London;
the Anne Frank Haus; the Jewish Museums of Paris and Berlin, in Prague, New
York and Taipei and twice at the Berlin Reichstag – on one occasion for MPs
and on another, to mark Germany’s Holocaust Memorial Day.

Luke Holland will attend the screening to discuss the film and the
film-making, as well as his on-going engagement in the unfinished business
of the Third Reich.


Starting this academic year, the European Institute will be hosting a regular Film Salon. During these events, we will screen films produced in and with diverse topics of wider European relevance, in all genres. All screenings are free and will be followed by discussion.

The first season in our Salon Series is dedicated to films in documentary and experimental, semi-documentary formats engaging with the legacy of war. More concretely, the selected films focus not on victims but on perpetrators: on those who did not suffer but commit crimes during war and dictatorship, and the ways both their families and society at large are coming to terms with these acts across the generations.