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COMMENTS 

EU referendum: the view of a UCL clinician-scientist

John Martin, Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at UCL, argues that scientific advance relies on creativity, cooperation, and financing. To leave the EU would diminish all three, dimming the light of British science in the world and threatening the UK’s future economy. This piece is part of the UCL European Institute’s commissioning partnership with openDemocracy. For more on this topic, join the UCL European Institute for its high-level panel discussion EU Membership and UK Science on 12 May.
10 May 2016
John Martin
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Starts: May 10, 2016 12:00:00 AM

‘Eurofog’ of claim and counterclaim on EU membership and UK science

Graeme Reid, Professor of Science and Research Policy at UCL, recently advised a House of Lords inquiry on the impact of EU membership on UK  science and research. In this post, he discusses the inquiry’s main findings, both expected and unexpected. He also joins a high-level panel to discuss the topic at the UCL European Institute on 12 May 2016.
10 May 2016
Graeme Reid
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Starts: May 10, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Something rotten in the state of Czechia?

The Czech Republic has been in the news recently because of its politicians' somewhat quick Celtic campaign to rebrand the country to the world as ‘Czechia’. But among political scientists and businesspeople the country's name has long suffered worst damage than this.
5 May 2016
Dr Sean Hanley
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Starts: May 5, 2016 12:00:00 AM

Postwar Cosmopolitanism: Political Universalism from the Seven Years' War to the Cold War

Publication date: Nov 13, 2013 04:48 PM

Start: May 01, 2014 12:00 AM

1-2 May 2014
The aim of this project, hosted by UCL’s Centre for Transnational History and supported under the UCL EI Small Grants Scheme, is to explore the genealogy of ideas of world order with a focus on the theme of war.


When:
1-2 May 2014

Where:
UCL Roberts Building
Torrington Place
London WC1E 7JE

   


Looking at a period from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century, the project will seek to recover connections between cosmopolitan ideals and the social history of major international conflicts such as the Seven Years’ War, the Napoleonic Wars, the two World Wars, and the Cold War.

The project consists of three parts:

  • A virtual panel, with short filmed interviews and contributions from academics;
  • Concert: "A Dream of Germany", curated by David Owen Norris, live at the Warburg Institute and on digital radio on 1 May 2014;
  • A 1.5-day conference on 1-2 May 2014. Download the final programme.

Using a nuanced understanding of war as a cultural phenomenon opens up prospects for revisiting Enlightenment cosmopolitanism – typically associated with peace – through an unfamiliar lens. Wars produce literary genres and cultural forms of their own; they not only destroy, but also create new connections between ideas and people; they also provide a reservoir of traumatic memories from which new ideas of political order arise. The intention is to give some thought to the connection between cosmopolitan orders and the changing use-value of the term ‘cosmopolitanism’ itself: in the pens of the Enlightenment philosophes, it ranged from political universalism to anti-imperial pluralism; among nineteenth-century nationalists, it was used to promote or defend national causes; in the twentieth-century totalitarian states, it was associated with Jewish identity, and in the post-Cold War world, it is variously associated with the ‘one’ as well as with the ‘ninety-nine percent’, with dictatorship as well as with democracy.

See the full conference website for more:


This project is supported by UCL European Institute's Call for Proposals