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Seminar: DAMOS – Database of Mycenaean at Oslo

Tue, 28 Jul 2015 10:28:15 +0000

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2015 Friday July 31 at 16:30 in room G21A, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU Federico Aurora (Oslo): ‘DAMOS – Database of Mycenaean at Oslo’ DĀMOS is an annotated corpus of all the published Mycenaean texts, allowing for a corpus linguistics approach to the study […]

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Seminar: A Collection of Greek Ritual Norms (CGRN)

Tue, 21 Jul 2015 13:56:50 +0000

Digital Classicist London & Institute of Classical Studies Seminar 2015 Friday July 24 at 16:30 in room G21A, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU Saskia Peels (Liège): ‘A Collection of Greek Ritual Norms Project (CGRN)’ This talk presents the project A Collection of Greek Ritual Norms, abbreviated CGRN (University of Liège). The CGRN is […]

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The UCL Centre for Digital Humanities contributes to and holds a variety of events.

Recurring events include the UCLDH Seminar series. Our events are primarily advertised right here on this page, which is syndicated in an RSS feed, but also on our DH Blog, on Twitter, and via our mailing list

Archive of Programme

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Networking to the fourth power: Reassembling the Republic of Letters, 1500-1800

Start: May 6, 2015 5:30:00 PM

Between 1500 and 1800, the development of increasingly affordable, reliable, and accessible postal systems allowed scholars to scatter correspondence across and beyond Europe.  This epistolary exchange knit together the self-styled ‘republic of letters’, an international, knowledge-based civil society central to that era’s intellectual breakthroughs and formative for many of modern Europe’s values and institutions. Despite its importance, the republic of letters remains poorly integrated into early modern European intellectual history, and this is primarily for one simple reason: its core practice of creating communities by dispersing archives of manuscripts has posed insuperable difficulties to subsequent generations of historians attempting to reconstruct the very documents which established this community.  The ongoing revolution in digital communication provides, for the first time, an adequate medium for reassembling the material dispersed by the earlier revolution in postal communication; but before this potential can be realized we need, not merely to adapt the technology to the task, but also to adapt our working methods and scholarly cultures to the technology. More specifically, we need (1) to create an interdisciplinary network of archivists, librarians, IT systems developers, experts in communication and design, educationalists, and scholars from many different fields (2) to design the networking infrastructure and scholarly practices needed (3) to support an international scholarly community devoted (4) to piecing back together the scattered documentation of the international republic of letters.  In other words, we need a network to design a network to support a network reconstructing networks: networking to the fourth power. 

Embodiments, Subjectivities and Reconfigurations of Urban Spaces via GPS Mobile Applications: Driving/Guiding

Start: May 20, 2015 5:30:00 PM

In his research, Regner Ramos explores the relationship between bodies, urban space and mobile technologies by studying the affectional and spatial properties of three GPS-based mobile applications—Grindr, Mappiness and Waze. Guided by cyberfeminist theories, he approaches these apps as a series of material objects, particularly when addressing the physical and spatial properties of the screen/interface; through interface and performance the apps create a sense of othering and difference, as theorised by Donna Haraway, Rosie Braidotti and Katherine Hayles. Thus, his dissertation seeks to address and understand the ways in which GPS apps create new spatiotemporal relations for bodies, as well as how these relations are made visible/mobilised by the interfaces’ spatial and urban representations.

Digital Humanities: Perspectives on Past, Present and Future

Start: May 27, 2015 6:00:00 PM

Susan_Hockey
In our first installment of The Susan Hockey Lecture series, Professor Susan Hockey discusses the trajectory of digital humanities from its many years on the fringes to its current position at the centre of the humanities scholarly arena, and its future challenges. Today, conferences, courses and publications in digital humanities abound, and jobs are advertised almost every week. The advent of the World Wide Web shifted emphasis from analytical software to communication and publication tools bringing humanities resources to a much wider audience in classrooms and in the home. The groundwork for many of these new ways of working is in place now.
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