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Archive

January,2016

Title: Evolutionary and Interpretive Archaeologies - A Dialogue

Author(s): Ethan Cochrane and Andrew Gardner (eds.)

Publisher/Year: Left Coast Press; 2011

Content:
This collection of original articles compares various key archaeological topics—agency, violence, social groups, diffusion—from evolutionary and interpretive perspectives. These two strands representthe major current theoretical poles in the discipline. By comparing and contrasting the insights they provide into major archaeological themes, this volume demonstrates the importance of theoretical frameworks in archaeological interpretations. Chapter authors discuss relevant Darwinian or interpretive theory with short archaeological and anthropological case studies to illustrate the substantive conclusions produced. The book will advance debate and contribute to a better understanding of the goals and research strategies that comprise these distinct research traditions.

Evolutionary and Interpretive




Library Location - Explore - INST ARCH AH COC

Note:

The UCL Institute of Archaeology Library acts in good faith by making these materials available online. We have sought to ensure that the content of these materials comply with UK copyright law. If you are a rights holder and feel that your copyright has been infringed in any way, please contact us at lib-archaeology@ucl.ac.uk or UCL Institute of Archaeology Library, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY

February,2016

Title: Cultures of Commodity Branding

Author(s): Andrew Bevan (Editor); David Wengrow (Editor)

Publisher/Year: Routledge 2010

Content:

Commodity branding did not emerge with contemporary global capitalism. In fact, the authors of this volume show that the cultural history of branding stretches back to the beginnings of urban life in the ancient Near East and Egypt, and can be found in various permutations in places as diverse as the Bronze Age Mediterranean, and Early Modern Europe. What the contributions in this volume also vividly document, both in past social contexts and recent ones as diverse as the kingdoms of Cameroon, Socialist Hungary or online eBay auctions, is the need to understand branded commodities as part of a broader continuum with techniques of gift-giving, ritual, and sacrifice. This volume obliges specialists in marketing and economics to reassess the relationship between branding and capitalism, as well as adding an important new concept to the work of economic anthropologists and archaeologists.

Commodity Branding


Library Location - Explore - INST ARCH AH BEV

Note:

The UCL Institute of Archaeology Library acts in good faith by making these materials available online. We have sought to ensure that the content of these materials comply with UK copyright law. If you are a rights holder and feel that your copyright has been infringed in any way, please contact us at lib-archaeology@ucl.ac.uk or UCL Institute of Archaeology Library, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY

March, 2016

Title: Maya Christians and Their Churches in Sixteenth-Century Belize

Author(s): Elizabeth, Graham

Publisher/Year: University Press of Florida; 2011


Content:

Based on her analysis of archaeological evidence from the excavations of Maya churches at Tipu and Lamanai, Elizabeth Graham seeks to understand why the Maya sometimes actively embraced Catholicism during the period of European conquest and continued to worship in this way even after the end of Spanish occupation.

The Maya in Belize appear to have continued to bury their dead in Christian churchyards long after the churches themselves had fallen into disuse. They also seem to have hidden pre-Hispanic objects of worship in Christian sacred spaces during times of persecution, and excavations reveal the style of the early churches to be unmistakably Franciscan. The evidence suggests that the Maya remained Christian after 1700, when Spaniards were no longer in control, which challenges the widespread assumption that because Christianity was imposed by force it was never properly assimilated by indigenous peoples.

Combining historical and archaeological data with her experience of having been raised as a Roman Catholic, Graham proposes a way of assessing the concept of religious experience and processes of conversion that takes into account the material, visual, sensual, and even olfactory manifestations of the sacred.

Maya Christians and Their Churches in Sixteenth-Century Belize.jpg


Library Location - Explore - INST ARCH DFB 200 GRA

Short Loan Collection - IOA Issue Desk GRA 7

View On-line

Note:

The UCL Institute of Archaeology Library acts in good faith by making these materials available online. We have sought to ensure that the content of these materials comply with UK copyright law. If you are a rights holder and feel that your copyright has been infringed in any way, please contact us at lib-archaeology@ucl.ac.uk or UCL Institute of Archaeology Library, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY

April,2016

Title: Archaeology and Women

Author(s): Sue Hamilton (Editor); Ruth D. Whitehouse (Editor); Katherine I. Wright (Editor)

Publisher/Year: Left Coast Press, 2006


Content:

This publication draws together from a variety of angles work currently being done within a contemporary framework on women in archaeology. One section of this collection of original articles addresses the historical and contemporary roles of women in the discipline. Another attempts to link contemporary archaeological theory and practice to work on women and gender in other fields. Finally, this volume presents a wide diversity of theoretical approaches and methods of study of women in the ancient world, representing a cross section of work being carried out today under the broad banner of gender archaeology. The geographical and chronological range of these papers is also intentionally wide, from Southeast Asia and South America to Western Asia, Egypt and Europe, from Great Britain to Greece, and from 10,000 years ago to the recent past. An ideal sampler for courses dealing with women and archaeology.

Archaeology and Women.jpg


Library Location - Explore -INST ARCH BD 20 HAM

Short Loan Collection - IOA Issue Desk HAM 3

Note:

The UCL Institute of Archaeology Library acts in good faith by making these materials available online. We have sought to ensure that the content of these materials comply with UK copyright law. If you are a rights holder and feel that your copyright has been infringed in any way, please contact us at lib-archaeology@ucl.ac.uk or UCL Institute of Archaeology Library, 31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY


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