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Aneesha Singh

Aneesha Singh BSc, MSc

Location:University College London


Location: Room 3.04

Computer Science Department, UCL Interaction Centre
66 - 72 Gower Street, London, WC1E 6EA

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7679 0683 (x30683)
Email: a.singh@cs.ucl.ac.uk


Google scholar: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=vYSVHBEAAAAJ&hl=en


Twitter: @puddlelogic

a-singh2

Research Interests

I am interested in technology that incorporates affect and emotion for behaviour change, specifically through the use of multimodal feedback. For technology to effect behaviour change, it should be able to adapt and be personalised to the affective needs of the user group and individual. I am specifically investigating the use of technology in supporting physical activity in people with chronic pain through the use of ubiquitous, wearable technology that gives multimodal feedback based on emotional.

Jump to: 2014 | 2013 | 2012
Number of items: 7.

2014

Singh, A; Klapper, A; Jia, J; Fidalgo, A; Tajadura-Jimenez, A; Kanakam, N; Bianchi-Berthouze, N; (2014) Motivating People with Chronic Pain to do Physical Activity: Opportunities for Technology Design. In: ACM. Association for Computing Machinery Green open access
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2013

Aung, MSH; Romera-Paredes, B; Singh, A; Lim, S; Kanakam, N; Williams, ACDC; Bianchi-Berthouze, N; (2013) GETTING RID OF PAIN-RELATED BEHAVIOUR TO IMPROVE SOCIAL AND SELF PERCEPTION: A TECHNOLOGY-BASED PERSPECTIVE. Presented at: UNSPECIFIED.

Aung, MSH; Singh, A; Lim, SL; CdC Williams, A; Watson, P; Bianchi-Berthouze, N; (2013) Automatic Recognition of Protective Behaviour in Chronic Pain Rehabilitation. In: Proceedings of the Workshop on Ubiquitous games and gamification for promoting behavior change and wellbeing. ACM Green open access
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2012

Cella, M; Aung, MSH; Meng, H; Bianchi-Berthouze, N; Romera-Paredes, B; Singh, A; Shafizadehkenari, M; (2012) Identifying Pain Behaviour for Automatic Recognition. International Association for the Study of Pain.

Singh, A; Swann-Sternberg, T; Berthouze, N; Williams, ACDC; (2012) Interactive Technology to Support Physical Activity in People With Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: What Users Want. In: (Proceedings) 14th World Congress on Pain.

Singh, A; Swann-Sternberg, T; Bianchi-Berthouze, N; Williams, A; Pantic, M; Watson, P; (2012) Workshop: Emotion and pain: interactive technology to motivate physical activity in people with chronic pain. In: (Proceedings) the 30th ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

Swann-Sternberg, T; Singh, A; Bianchi-Berthouze, N; Williams, ACDC; (2012) User needs for technology supporting physical activity in chronic pain. Presented at: UNSPECIFIED.

This list was generated on Sun Jan 31 05:54:02 2016 GMT.
Physical activity is important for improving function and quality of life in people with chronic pain, but they often find it difficult to maintain and build physical activity towards long-term goals. This can be due to factors like fear of increased pain or damage,  lack of confidence and of support when doing physical activity. There is insufficient research to guide the design of interactive technology to motivate and support people with chronic pain in doing physical activity. We conducted studies with people with chronic pain, and pain-specialist physiotherapists, to understand what strategies people use to increase and maintain physical activity in daily life and what factors hold them back. The findings from these studies (role-plays, interviews, focus groups, observations of physiotherapist-led activity sessions, pain rehabilitation education programmes, and analysis of blogs and internet forums) were used to propose design opportunities for technology that can support and motivate people to maintain a routine of physical activity and in the long-term to improve their quality of life. Based on findings from these studies, we built a wearable device, "Go-with-the-flow", to investigate the use of auditory feedback to overcome some of the barriers to physical activity by focusing on pleasurable alternative sensations such as sound or breathing. We evaluated the prototype using a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods through short-term studies in the lab and week-long exploratory studies in the home. Through results of these evaluations we have proposed a framework for using sound in rehabilitation for chronic pain.

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