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UCLIC Seminars

Sriram Subramanian, University of Sussex

Wednesday 10th February, 3pm, Room 405, 66-72 Gower Street

Title

Shape of Things to Come

Abstract

One of the visions on my research is to deliver novel experiences to users without instrumenting them with wearable or head-mounted displays. My team has been exploring various technical solutions to creating systems that can deform and transform into new objects or shapes while still supporting the display of visual content. For example, we created shape-changing tablets that can show maps with topographical information and morphing mirrors that can enable new forms of augmentation. In this talk, I will present some of our recent projects on this topic and conclude with the use of acoustic radiation forces to create shape-shifting atoms.

Bio

Sriram Subramanian is a Professor of Informatics at the University of Sussex where he leads a research group on novel interactive systems. Before joining Sussex, he was a Professor of Human-computer Interaction at the University of Bristol and prior to this a senior scientist at Philips Research Netherlands. He is specifically interested in rich and expressive input combining multi-touch, haptics and touchless gestures. Hi is also the co-founder of Ultrahaptics a spin-out company that aims to commercialise the mid-air haptics enabled by his ERC grant.

Seminars Location:

UCLIC research seminars are on Wednesdays at 3pm during term-time. Please see notices for confirmation of the room number for each seminar.

If you would like to come and give a seminar talk, or would like further details on any seminars listed here, please contact Ana Tajadura-Jiménez or Sandy Gould.

m.c. schraefel, University of Southampton – 3rd February 2016

Title

Aspiration Aligned Performance Rather than Prevention-focussed Approaches for Health & Wellbeing with Future Athlete vs Future Invalid & Experiment in a Box

Abstract

How do we design to support better health and wellbeing practices? What is the role of interactive, computational technologies, IoT ecosystems and so on in this space? I'd argue that to design for health and wellbeing - as HCI researchers we can better approach these questions if we ourselves are better at a few things:

  1. knowing more about how being in a body mediates how we do and feel about anything we do and feel
  2. if our perspective on health and wellbeing shifts from designing primarily for prevention to performance
  3. if we help people see for themselves how they are better at anything they/we want to do when we are physically better (or fit).

Many of us may not see that we have the time or opportunities to specialise in neurology, physiology, nutrition, kinesiology and prefer instead to collaborate with experts in health to help us design tools. We may want to ask: how is that working? What do the literature reviews say about the efficacy of the majority of eHealth and mHealth tools? The answer - so far - seems to motivate a need for a different approach - at least to explore some new possibilities - which includes the kind of thinking that UCL and your group is very good at: looking at how we make sense of our current state - what i'd suggest may be framed as well as looking at how we construct is our cultural of normal with our various technologies of normal - from chairs to hand held mobile phones.

In this talk, i'd like ot share some possible models (Future athlete vs invalid and Experiment in a Box in particular) for re-considering human health and wellbeing - what i've been calling wellth - reflecting on our cultural normals and how re-inscribe those norms with our (interactive) technology. I'd like to begin this exploration with you reading this right now: for those of us who are not in hospital, or classed as "sick" if asked the question "have you ever felt better than you do right now?" would you say "yes"? If yes, why? And if yes, what do you think interactive technology can do about it? I hope to make the case that it can do it better - immediately and almost effortlessly - once we ourselves know a little more about what is not normal but more optimal for us as physical-social-cognitive creatures. @mcphoo #MakeBetterNormal

Will look forward to meeting with you - if you'd like to meet with me please let Anna know so we can set up a time together.

Bio

m.c. schraefel, phd, ceng, fbcs, cscs. Relative to HCI i hold a chair in Computer Science and Human Performance, Department of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton; I've just wound up a Research Chair award from the Royal Academy of Engineering and Microsoft Research on design and evaluation of systems to support creativity. I'm currently the deputy head of our department for Research and lead the Agents Interaction and Complexity Group and direct the WellthLab for Human Systems Interaction. I am a visiting scientist in the Decentralised Information Group at CSAIL/W3 MIT. I also hold a variety of certifications (and practitioner insurance) in strength and conditioning, functional neurology and nutrition. This means I get to work with real people dealing with a lot of performance aspirations. I love the brain/body connection. If you'd like to see an example of applied research working in industry here's a vid of a pilot we ran on the brain/body connection in support of creativity: tinyurl.com/in5ogilvy. Please connect with me @mcphoo and let me know any questions you may have ahead of time. Look forward to meeting you all. Thank you to Anna Cox and Clan for the invitation.



Andrew Manches, University of Edinburgh –  20th January 2016

Title

Interaction, Embodiment and Technologies in Early Learning

Abstract

Most of us might agree that ‘hands-on learning' is good for children in the early years. But why? Is it simply more fun and sociable, or are there any more direct cognitive benefits? And what determines definitions of ‘hands-on’? Can we include iPads? This talk will draw upon an ESRC-funded project to examine the educational implications of recent theoretical arguments about the embodied nature of cognition. Video data from the project will be used to illustrate the methodological significance of the way children gesture when describing mathematical concepts and evaluate a hypothesis that numerical development is grounded upon two particular embodied metaphors. If correct, this presents a serious challenge to traditional approaches to the types of learning materials we offer children. The talk then demonstrates two embodied technologies to consider the potential of new forms of digital interaction to further our understanding of embodied cognition as well as support early learning.

Bio

Dr Andrew Manches is a Chancellor’s Fellow in the School of Education and leads the Children and Technology group at the University of Edinburgh. He has 20 years experience working with children, first as a teacher, then as an academic. His recent research, funded by an ESRC Future Research Leader grant, focuses on the role of interaction in thinking, and the implications this has for early learning and new forms of technology. When not being an academic, Andrew is a parent of two young children and directs an early learning technology start-up that was awarded a SMART grant this year to build an early years maths tangible technology.



Adrian Friday, Lancaster University – 13th January 2016

Title

A role for ICT toward Sustainable Futures?

Abstract

To say that we are living at a time where unprecedented threats to our survival may be mediated or undermined by digital technology is no exaggeration. From climate change to national security, digital tools’ strengths bring unparalleled potential for understanding and controlling our world in new ways. But, the wider impacts of the use of ICT are ill understood, and poorly designed systems might do more harm than good: ICT itself now accounts for 10% of global energy demand - and climbing - and this impact is not yet a factor in systems' design or in most CS curricula! I’m drawn by ICT's potential for addressing large scale societal challenges, such as climate change. In this talk I offer a glimpse of this potential following our recent in the wild studies of energy use and data demand in the home; and secondly, discuss ways in which HCI design might evolve such systems to more profoundly challenge ‘the normal way’ energy is used.

Bio

Adrian Friday is a Professor of Computer Science at Lancaster University with over 20 years’ experience of developing and studying infrastructure for real world ubiquitous systems, from the early origins of mobile computing in the 1990s through to his longitudinal ‘in the wild’ studies of situated public displays since 2006. He was one of the Principal Investigators in Equator, a high impact UK wide interdisciplinary initiative, 2001-7, and a co-investigator in the EU funded PDNET and Recall FET projects. Adrian is widely published and cited in the international research community, with over 120 peer reviewed articles to date. He was TPC chair of the leading Ubicomp & Pervasive conferences in 2006 and 2009, and general co-chair of Ubicomp 2014. His recent work is at the intersection of Computing and Sustainability, where he has brought several disciplines together to understand energy use and large scale GHG impacts of everyday life. This work has led to several recent accolades, including a sustainability award at Pervasive 2010, and a best paper award at CHI 2015.

http://www.research.lancs.ac.uk/portal/en/people/adrian-friday



Christoph Pimmer, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland – 9th December 2015

Title

From cognition to identity development: the multi-faceted affordances of digital media for health professionals

Abstract

Digital media are increasingly embedded in work, communication and learning practices of health care professionals. Addressing this development, Christoph Pimmer will provide insights into some of his recent work on the affordances and constraints of the use of digital and, in particular, mobile and social mobile media in health settings.

This includes experiences from the design and experimental evaluation of a smartphone-based consultation system for Swiss hospital doctors to examine and contrast the different modes of speech, images and image annotation for knowledge exchange.¹ Arguing that technology should not be conceived as a separate entity, Christoph will also illustrate the ways the ways in which medical actors use and connect speech, bodily movements (e.g., gestures), and the visual and haptic structures of their own bodies and of artefacts, such as technological instruments and computers, to construct complex, multimodal representations.² 

The use of digital technologies is not restricted to high income settings but in particular mobile and social media are gaining in popularity in low and middle income countries. Mirroring this dynamic, Christoph will discuss observations from Asian and African contexts, where, for example, tens of thousands of health professionals have appropriated a Facebook site as an informal Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) which harbours rich forms of learning and professional participation;³,⁴ or other studies where rural South African midwives use a range of mobile and social media tools for 'organically-grown', learning and communication practices.⁵

Bio

Christoph Pimmer is currently a visiting researcher at the UCL Institute of Education. In Switzerland he works as senior researcher and lecturer at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland FHNW. Christoph’s interests are centred on the role of digital media for learning and knowledge processes. Most of his academic work has concentrated on the use of mobile and social media with a particular focus on public and global health. His research on learning and communication technologies has been funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF), the Swiss Commission for Technology and Innovation (CTI), EU-lifelong learning and various other funding bodies in Switzerland.

References

1. Pimmer C, Mateescu M, Zahn C, Genewein U. Smartphones as multimodal communication devices to facilitate clinical knowledge processes - a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Medical Internet Research. 2013;15(11):e263.

2. Pimmer C, Pachler N, Genewein U. Reframing Clinical Workplace Learning Using the Theory of Distributed Cognition. Academic Medicine. 2013;88(9):1239–1245.

3. Pimmer C, Linxen S, Gröhbiel U. Facebook as a learning tool? A case study on the appropriation of social network sites along with mobile phones in developing countries. British Journal of Educational Technology. 2012;43(5):726-738.

4. Pimmer C, Linxen S, Gröhbiel U, Jha A, Burg G. Mobile learning in resource-constrained environments. A case study of medical education. Medical Teacher. 2013;35(5):e1157-e1165. 

5. Pimmer C, Brysiewicz P, Linxen S, Walters F, Chipps J, Gröhbiel U. Informal mobile learning in nurse education and practice in remote areas. A case study from rural South Africa. Nurse Education Today. 2014;34(11):1398-1404.



Jo Pugh, University of York – 2nd December 2015

Title

Here be dragons: information seeking in digital heritage collections

Abstract

Visitors to archival reading rooms receive a considerable amount of help and support from archivists and overwhelmingly report positive experiences from their engagement with professionals. Conversely, many users of large scale digitised archival catalogues and collections spend much of their time very confused.

In this paper we will discuss the barriers faced by users of digital archival collections, the strategies that experts and novices use to surmount them and how the systems themselves could provide more support and reduce user uncertainty.

I will present the results of a series of studies carried out at the National Archives focusing on user enquiries through multiple communication channels (on- and offline) and the interactions between archivists, users and archival systems. We will then discuss the results of a further study combining recorded online search sessions and participant interviews and examine why users succeed and fail to make progress in online archival search. Gathering all of this evidence together we will weigh up a series of techniques which could be applied to digital catalogues in order to better support users to locate the material they need

Bios

Jo is an ESPRC funded collaborative doctoral student in the HCI group at the University of York and at the National Archives. His research focuses on information seeking in archival collections. Prior to commencing his doctoral work in 2012, he worked for six years in online education at the National Archives and for a number of museums and galleries. He has an MA in Museum Studies from the Institute of Archaeology at UCL and his first degree was in history.



Joel Fischer, University of Nottingham – 25th November 2015

Title

Appropriate ‘intelligent' systems for the real world

Abstract

Recent research into the use of consumer devices such as the NEST ‘learning’ thermostat has shown that interaction with these systems is problematic as they are, for example, unable to interpret human intent. In this talk, I want to explore what (in-)appropriate interaction with such proactive systems may look like in the real world. To this end, I will present some of our own research into sketching future infrastructures (CHI ’13), domestic energy-related practices such as doing the washing (CHI ’14), and supporting energy advice work done by a charity (UbiComp ’14). I will also present on-going research into the use of environmental data (e.g., temperature and humidity) as a resource in advice, drawing on video analysis of face-to-face advice sessions. Our research shows some of the ways in which systems rub up against, or are made to fit in with people’s everyday practices, and how understanding and advice-giving turns upon unpacking the indexical relationship of the data to the situated goings-on in the home. I will attempt to draw out some common characteristics that have implications for the design of (in-)appropriate ‘intelligent’ systems for the real world.

This talk should be particularly useful for people with an interest in the home, energy, UbiComp, IoT, and ethnomethodology.

References:

Fischer, J.E., Costanza, E., Ramchurn, S.D., Colley, J. and Rodden, T. (2014).Energy Advisors at Work: Charity Work Practices to Support People in Fuel Poverty.In: Proceedings of the 2014 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp ’14). ACM Press.

Costanza, E., Fischer, J.E., Colley, J.A., Rodden, T., Ramchurn, S.D. and Jennings, N.R. (2014). Doing the Laundry with Agents: a Field Trial of a Future Smart Energy System in the Home. In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’14). ACM Press.

Rodden, T., Fischer, J.E., Pantidi, N., Bachour, K. and Moran, S. (2013). At Home with Agents: Exploring Attitudes Towards Future Smart Energy Infrastructures.In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI ’13). ACM Press.

Bios

Joel Fischer is an assistant professor at the School of Computer Science, University of Nottingham, and a member of the Mixed Reality Lab. His research in HCI brings together human-centred design with computational methods to support human activities and sense-making in collaborative real-world domains such as Energy and Disaster Response; drawing on a multidisciplinary approach including ethnography, participatory design, prototyping, and deployments in the wild. Joel has a broad interest in HCI, particularly mobile and ubiquitous computing in the wild, CSCW and interactive systems design. He has previously worked at Fraunhofer Germany and interned at (formerly Xerox) PARC in the US. He is a co-investigator on the EPSRC CharIoT project supporting non-profit energy advice work. Previously, he has assumed leading roles in the EPSRC ORCHID platform grant. His recent research focused on user­-centred explorations of smart future energy systems and disaster response and has been published at leading conferences in HCI (CHI, UbiComp, CSCW) and AI (AAMAS, IJCAI), and has been awarded Best Paper awards at CHI 2013 and AAMAS 2015.



Nicolas Roussel and Sylvain Malacria, Inria (Lille) – 19th November 2015

Title

Mjolnir: Computing tools to empower users

Abstract

Mjolnir is an Inria research team created in January 2015 in partnership with Université Lille 1. Our research aims at producing original ideas, fundamental knowledge and practical tools to inspire, inform and support the design of human-computer interactions. We favor the vision of computers as tools, we would like them to empower people, and we believe this can only be achieved by supporting both transparent (from a cognitive perspective) and analytic use. Our short to medium term objectives are to investigate ways to leverage human perceptual, control and learning skills in this perspective.

The first part of the talk will be focused on Inria, its Lille research center and the creation of the Mjolnir team. The second part will be focused on our work toward improving user's expertise with software applications. In particular, we will explain the design and evaluation of systems for helping users to use "expert" features while interacting with both desktop and touch-based computers.

Bios

Nicolas Roussel is a senior researcher at Inria, the scientific head of the Mjolnir research team, and the scientific officer of Inria's Lille - Nord Europe research center. His research interests are in Human-Computer Interaction and include computer-mediated communication and groupware, engineering of interactive systems, graphical interaction, and tactile and gestural interaction. He has published and served as organizing or program committee member in conferences such as ACM CHI, ACM UIST, IHM, ACM CSCW, ECSCW and ACM Multimedia.

Sylvain Malacria is a researcher at Inria since november 2014. His research interests are in the design if new interaction techniqueswith additional focus on understanding and improving the transition from novice to expert mode in graphical interfaces. Before working at Inria, he did a 10 months post-doc with in the UCL/BBC London Media Technology Campus, and a two years post-doc with Andy Cockburn at the University of Canterbury (New Zealand).



Robb Mitchell, University of Southern Denmark – 28th October 2015

Title

Design Patterns for Social Icebreaking.

Abstract

Bored? Lonely ? Have you ever…

- struggled for an excuse to approach someone?

- found it difficult to make eye contact?

- recoiled from interpersonal touch (whilst secretly yearning it)?

- felt that your actions were ignored? Or found it too easy to ignore other people?

- had the sensation that everyone was on a different level to you?

- felt socially inhibited whilst being observed?

- avoided open ended encounters for fear of getting stuck for e v e r?

- or had any other difficulties in initiating or sustaining co-located social encounters?

- or perhaps you have “a friend” in this position? Or these issues overlap with some of your research challenges?

Then come along to participate in a bouncy romp reviewing what interaction design may offer to address these difficulties (discretion assured).

Bio

Robb Mitchell is assistant professor, social interaction design at the University of Southern Denmark, following a PhD there entitled “Facilitating Shared Understandings of Risk”. A graduate of Environmental Art at Glasgow School of Art, his research and practice draws upon a diverse background that includes community development, market research, music promotion, cultural management, science communication and new media curating. This has ranged from bright lights, big city stuff with Ministry of Sound and Franz Ferdinand to activities with children and the elderly on the remote Scottish island of Orkney. A common thread running through most of his work has been developing novel artifacts, environments, and processes that bring people closer together ­ whether creatively, socially and professionally. In particular, addressing the barriers that may prevent or reduce interaction, exchange and collaboration between remote locations, different disciplines, different abilities, levels of expertise and/or levels of familiarity.



Fraser Allison, University of Melbourne –14th October 2015

Title

User Experiences of Voice Interaction in Games: Identity, Power and Control

Abstract

In the past half-decade, advances in voice recognition technology and the proliferation of consumer devices such as the Microsoft Kinect have seen a significant rise in the use of voice interaction in games. While the use of player-to-player voice is widespread and well-researched, the use of voice as an input is relatively unexplored. In this research we looked at video and textual recordings of players interacting with virtual characters using their voice. From a grounded theory analysis, we observed that user acceptance of and performance with voice interaction is bound up in subjective notions of identity, embodiment, authority and control between the user and their avatar.

Bio

Fraser Allison is a PhD student at the Microsoft Research Centre for Social Natural User Interfaces at the University of Melbourne. His research focus is the relationship between users and virtual characters, and his PhD thesis explores how this relationship affects experiences of voice interaction. Fraser completed an Honours thesis at RMIT University in 2010, on how a videogame design supports immersion and conveys a subjective experience. He has also worked for several years as a consultant and technology manager at an Australian market research consultancy



Joseph Giacomin, Brunel University – 7th October 2015

Title

Human Centred Design: a business paradigm for 21st century enterprise

Abstract

The 21st century is characterised by ever growing expectations regarding experiences, quality of life, privacy and ethics. With the growing pressure for human centred products, systems and services, the activity of design has taken centre stage in most customer driven innovation. Having often been described as the "century of the human mind", the current period is rich in new products, systems and services which are characterised by interactivity, emotion and meaning. This seminar will define the paradigm of human centred design, an approach which is being followed by ever greater numbers of businesses. The multidisciplinary paradigm will be defined in comparison to the main competing paradigms of technology-driven design and sustainable design, the business implications will be discussed and application examples will be provided.

Bio

Professor Joseph Giacomin is the Director of the Human Centred Design Institute (HCDI) of Brunel University.

Human Centred Design integrates multidisciplinary expertise towards enhancing human well-being and empowering people. In its most basic form it leads to products, systems and services which are physically, perceptually, cognitively and emotionally intuitive. In its most advanced form it discovers and unlocks latent needs and desires, supporting the achievement of desired futures for society.

He teaches undergraduate and postgraduate university modules in Human Factors with particular emphasis on matters of perception and emotion, and guest lectures widely at universities, governmental organisations and businesses. He has produced more than 60 professional publications including a recent book of thermal photography titled Thermal: seeing the world through 21st century eyes, and provides consultancy services to the design and manufacturing sectors.

He is a member of the editorial boards of Ergonomics and of the International Journal of Vehicle Noise and Vibration (IJVNV). He is a Fellow of the Institute of Ergonomics & Human Factors (FErgS), a Fellow of the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (FRSA), a member of the Associazione Per Il Disegno Industriale (ADI) and a member of the Royal Photographic Society (RPS).

Professor Joseph Giacomin has a Ph.D. from Sheffield University in the United Kingdom and has both Master's and Bachelor's degrees from the Catholic University of America in Washington D.C. U.S.A.. He has worked for both the American military and the European automobile industry.



Ted White, Uppsala University – 23rd September 2015

Title

"How mobile phones affect the sustainability of the work/life balance of their users"

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between sustainability of mobile phone users and work-life balance. Twenty-seven interviews were performed on managerial level mobile phone owners over the duration of a month and half. The study extends Clark’s¹ original Border theory that fails to mention how mobile phones (or indeed any other information and communication technology) influence the borders between the two domains. This study found technology has a definitive impact with separate users groups emerging from the data; border-extenders, border-adapters and border-enforcers.

1. Clark, S.C.: Work/family border theory: a new theory of work/family balance. Hum. Relat. 53, 747–770 (2000)

Bio

I, Ted White, was born and raised in Johannesburg, South Africa but spent a couple years living in Windsor, United Kingdom. I am currently a PhD psychology student at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg but am currently on an Erasmus Mundus mobility scholarship completing my studies in the Visual Information and Interaction division at Uppsala University, Sweden, for 23 months. My PhD topic is “Evolving border theory and self-regulation theory for a mobile phone generation” and looks at how cell phones blur the boundaries between home-work and cause an imbalance extending boundary and socio-cognitive theory. My PhD is anticipated to be completed by June/July 2016.

I am also a senior lecturer in the School of Computing at the University of South Africa, where I partnered with Google to launch Google Chromebooks into South Africa and Africa. This was done as a community engagement project in order to provide low-cost high impact devices to students at both a primary, secondary and tertiary levels. This was the first official Google sanctioned usage of the Chromebooks in South Africa and in Africa.



Thomas Gable & Bruce Walker, Georgia Tech – 4th September 2015

Title

This is How We Roll: HCI Driving Research in the Sonification Lab

Abstract

The Sonification Lab at Georgia Tech is an interdisciplinary lab under the School of Psychology and the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech. The lab focuses on development and evaluation of technologies that allow humans to interact with systems when they either cannot see or cannot look at an interface visually, or in an effort to enhance a visual interface to improve the user experience. One of the four pillars of the lab is driving technology where their focus looks at ways to enhance the drivers’ interaction within the driving environment. The lab’s approach to driving research will be discussed, along with plenty of examples of recent research projects.

Bio

Bruce N. Walker is a professor in the School of Psychology and the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech, and founder of the Sonification Lab. Dr. Walker completed his Ph.D. at Rice University in Human Factors Psychology and Human-Computer Interaction in 2001. He is a Core Faculty Member in the GVU Center, a member of the Center for Music Technology (GTCMT) and the Center for Biologically Inspired Design (CBID), and a Project Director in the WirelessRERC. Dr. Walker is currently the Past-President of the International Community for Auditory Display (ICAD).

Thomas M. Gable is an Engineering Psychology PhD student in the Sonification lab within the Georgia Tech School of Psychology. His research interests are centered on the intersection of human beings and technology as it relates to situation awareness, workload, and attention. He is involved in many of the driving projects in the Sonification lab and is one of the scenario developers for the School of Psychology's driving simulator. Thom graduated with a BA in Psychology from The College of Wooster and received his Masters in Psychology from Georgia Tech.



Gloria Mark, University of California, Irvine – 1st July 2015

Title

Precision Tracking of Digital Activity in situ: Patterns in Attention Focus, Mood and Stress

Abstract

The recent revolution in sensor technology is enabling new ways to measure human behavior in situ with precision. My goal is to understand digital technology use in real world environments, and how it affects human mood and behavior. Using a mixed-methods approach, I study how digital media use is related to multitasking, stress, mood, and focus. I will present data from information workers tracked in the workplace for multiple days, and from 124 Millennials tracked for multiple days, all waking hours. We collected this data using sensors and biosensors, SenseCams, experience sampling, and repeated surveys. This approach enables us to answer numerous questions, such as: To what extent do people multitask and self-interrupt? How do online and offline social interactions affect mood? What activities do people carry out when focused and bored throughout their workday? How can we explain what causes workplace distractions? What effects does email use have on focus, stress and mood? What factors are associated with productivity? I will present answers to these questions, and will discuss how these results can inform the design of computer technologies and practices that could be used to improve people's mood, focus and stress management.

Bio

Gloria Mark is a Professor in the Department of Informatics, University of California, Irvine. Her research focuses on the studying the impact of digital technology in real-world contexts. Her current projects include studying precision tracking of information workers' digital media use and mood, the use of ICTs in environments disrupted by conflict, and workplace social media. She received her PhD in Psychology from Columbia University. Prior to joining UCI in 2000, she worked at the German National Research Center for Information Technology (GMD, now Fraunhofer Institute) and has been a visiting researcher at Microsoft Research, IBM, Boeing, and The MIT Media Lab. In 2006 she received a Fulbright scholarship where she worked at the Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany. She has published in top conferences and journals in the fields of Human-Computer Interaction and Computer-Supported Cooperative Work. She has been the technical program chair for the ACM CSCW¹12, ACM CSCW'06, and ACM GROUP¹05 conferences, is the general chair for the ACM CHI¹17 conference, and is on the editorial board of ACM TOCHI and Human-Computer Interaction. Her work has also appeared in the popular press such as The New York Times, the BBC, NPR, Time, and The Wall Street Journal.



Rafael Calvo, University of Sydney – 19th June 2015

Title

Positive Computing: Technologies for psychological wellbeing and human potential

Abstract

Digital technologies have made their way into all the aspects of our lives that, according to psychology, influence our wellbeing -- everything from social relationships and curiosity to engagement and learning.  By bringing together research and methodologies well-established in psychology, education, neuroscience and human-computer interaction, we can begin to cultivate a new field dedicated to the design and development of technology that supports wellbeing and human potential. Positive computing has been call the "buzzword you need to know for 2015" by the Washington Post and Forbes.

More specifically, in this seminar I will present an introduction to our Human-Computer interaction work aiming to support psychological wellbeing. The suggested HCI framework builds on psychology, education, design and other disciplines addressing intrapersonal factors of wellbeing such as motivation, engagement, reflective thought and mindfulness, interpersonal factors such as empathy, and extrapersonalsuch as altruism.

For more information visit positivecomputing.org

Bio

Rafael Calvo is Professor at the University of Sydney, and ARC Future Fellow. He has taught at several Universities, high schools and professional training institutions. He worked at the Language Technology Institute in Carnegie Mellon University, Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Argentina) and on sabbaticals at the University of Cambridge and the University of Memphis. Rafael also has worked as an Internet consultant for projects in the US, Australia, Brasil, and Argentina. Rafael is the recipient of 5 teaching awards for his work on learning technologies, and the author of two books and many publications in the fields of learning technologies, affective computing and computational intelligence. Rafael is Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies and of IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing and Senior Member of IEEE. Rafael is Editor of the Oxford Handbook of Affective Computing and “Positive Computing” (MIT Press) with DorianPeters. For more information visit: rafael-calvo.com



Abigail Sellen, Microsoft Research Cambridge – 10th June 2015

Title

Designing Computer Systems That See

Abstract

The last decade has witnessed rapid advancements in computer vision systems, not just in the world of gaming, but in many aspects of everyday life from medical systems to augmented reality. Computer systems “that see” enable new forms of input, can track and identify people, can capture and model the physical world around us, and can be combined with other system capabilities such as conversational agents.  But the challenge in developing these systems is much more than technical. In this talk I explore the process of designing computer vision applications from a human perspective, and through our own attempts to build them for a variety of real world settings.  In doing so, I propose that such systems need to make their users aware of the differences between how computer systems and how people sense, perceive, analyse and respond to the world.  This has implications beyond computer vision to more general notions of “smart” systems in an era where artificial intelligence has again taken hold of our collective imagination.

Bio

Abigail Sellen is a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research Cambridge where she manages the Human Experience & Design Group. Prior to Microsoft, she worked at Hewlett-Packard Labs, Rank Xerox EuroPARC, Apple Computer and Bell Northern Research. Abigail first became interested in Human-Computer Interaction through a summer internship at Apple while working on her doctorate in Cognitive Science with Don Norman.  She has since published extensively on many diverse topics including the book "The Myth of the Paperless Office" (with co-author Richard Harper). Alongside her honorary professorship at UCL, she is also a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, Fellow of the British Computer Society, and a member of the ACM SIGCHI Academy.



Kathrin Gerling, University of Lincoln – 3rd June 2015

Title

Understanding Vulnerability at Play: Exploring Games for and with Audiences with Special Needs

Abstract

Games have a range of positive effects of games on our physical, cognitive, and emotional well-being. However, most design efforts focus on non-disabled players, and despite recent advances in game accessibility research, it remains unclear how audiences with special needs experience games, and whether they have full access to the benefits of play.
As a first step toward better understanding games for diverse audiences, this talk explores games for and with audiences with special needs, focusing on vulnerability that can emerge either from the involvement in the design process, or the engagement with games. It presents results from projects examining how older adults in long-term care engage with games, what the experiences of persons using wheelchairs playing movement-based games were, and how non-disabled students and young people using powered wheelchairs experienced the process of designing wheelchair-controlled video games.

Results suggest that designing games for and with audiences with special needs has potential to create empowering experiences, but may also unintentionally expose vulnerability among several parties. To this end, this talk outlines lessons learned from these projects to support future efforts aiming to bring the benefits of play to diverse audiences.

Bio

Kathrin Gerling is a Lecturer in Computer Science at the University of Lincoln, where she is part of the Lincoln Social Computing Research Centre (LiSC) and a member of the Games Research Group.


Her main research areas are human-computer interaction and accessibility; her work examines interactive technologies with a purpose besides entertainment. She is particularly interested in how interfaces can be made accessible for audiences with special needs, and how interactive technologies can be leveraged to support healthy lifestyles.  Her PhD research examined the potential of games to provide cognitive and physical stimulation for older adults, and her research on wheelchair-based game input, KINECTWheels, has been published at leading international venues, and was featured in the media.

Kathrin holds a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Saskatchewan, Canada, and she received a Master’s degree in Cognitive Science from the University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany. Before joining academia, she worked on different projects in the games industry, and still enjoys thinking about issues related to game usability and player experience.

kgerling@lincoln.ac.uk
http://staff.lincoln.ac.uk/kgerling 
http://lisc.lincoln.ac.uk
@kathringerling



Asimina Vasalou, UCL Institute of Education – 20th May 2015

Title

Participatory Design with Children: Shedding Light on How Children Can Influence Technology Design

Abstract

While there is little disagreement that children should be involved in the early stages of technology design, child-computer interaction researchers have grappled with how to ensure children’s input has an influence on technology. In learning technology design in particular there are often competing tensions between pedagogical knowledge and children’s ideas, emphasising the power relations between child and adult. In my talk, I will present two case studies of learning technology design: a serious game teaching conflict resolution skills and a reading app supporting children with dyslexia in their literacy. In taking two different approaches to children’s participation, I will argue that children’s influence on technology design is very much shaped by the designer’s goals and epistemology.

Bio

Mina Vasalou is a senior lecturer in the London Knowledge Lab at the UCL Institute of Education. Her background is in Design and Human-computer interaction. In her recent work, she has been exploring how children can participate in learning technology design, with a particular interest in how the situated local design context shapes their influence on technology. She was a co-organiser of a recent workshop on participatory design and serious games in CHI Play and is currently organising a special issue on this topic.



Jenny Bunn, UCL DIS – 13th May 2015

Title

Building an Interdisciplinary View of Personal Digital Archiving

Abstract

This paper builds on work carried out as part of a recent investigation (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/dis/icarus/projects/recordkeeping) into the binary opposition between personal and corporate recordkeeping. It will present an interdisciplinary view of the emerging field of ‘personal digital archiving’ which has been constructed by combining an archival perspective with a selection of material taken from HCI. It will ask questions about the usefulness of such a view and explore the potential for further collaboration between archives and records management and HCI in the question of personal digital archiving.

Bio

Jenny Bunn is a Lecturer on the Archives and Records Management programme at UCL. She has worked extensively as an archivist in institutions including The Royal Bank of Scotland and The National Archives and holds a PhD in Archive Studies. She is a committee member of the Archives and Records Association’s Section for Archives and Technology, a joint editor of Archives and Records and a founder member of the Cardigan Continuum (https://thecardigancontinuum.wordpress.com/) – an archives and records management reading group. Her current research interests include born digital description, digital curation and personal digital archiving.



Petr Slovak, TU Wien – 6th May 2015

Title

Supporting learning of social and emotional skills by digital technology

Abstract

I will discuss a series of on-going projects in which we aim to understand how digital technology can facilitate the development and learning of social and emotional skills. Drawing on recent results to be presented at CHI'15 and CSCW'15, I will emphasise two specific case studies. In the first, we cooperate with a MSc. counselling program at the University of Nottingham to explore how feedback of bio-signals and other data can be used to support the training of student counsellors. The second then focuses on how technology can facilitate social and emotional skills learning more broadly, working in collaboration with researchers and developers of 'Social and Emotional Learning' (SEL) curricula in educational psychology. These curricula are already deployed in over 40% of primary schools within US, as part of prevention programs for both in-risk and general populations, thus providing an opportunity for an interesting test-bed for new technologies in this space.

This research is funded by the OEAW DOC Fellowship and pursued in cooperation between HCI group at Technical University of Vienna, Mixed Reality Lab and Culture Lab (counselling part); as well as with Committee for Children and Microsoft Research Redmond (SEL curricula part).

Bio

Petr Slovak is a Doctoral Candidate in the HCI Group at Vienna University of Technology, supervised by Geraldine Fitzpatrick. He holds a BSc in Psychology/Sociology in addition to BSc. & MSc. in Computer Science, and his PhD is funded by the DOC Fellowship from Austrian Academy of Sciences. Petr's research focuses on support for teaching of social and emotional skills in educational and therapeutical settings, with specific interest on empathy. As part of his PhD project, Petr has built collaborations with researchers from University of Nottingham (UK), Newcastle University (UK), Philips Research (NL), Committee for Children (US), and Microsoft Research (Redmond, US).



Wally Smith, University of Melbourne – 5th May 2015

Title

What stage magic reveals about our interactions with technology

Abstract

In this talk I argue that we can draw insights from stage magic about people's interactions with technology. A general perspective is established by using Lucy Suchman's recent notion of 'human-machine reconfigurations' to compare conjuring performances with displays of computerised life forms. Analysis of recent projects in social robotics, for example, suggests that technologists often rely on techniques of 'dissimulation' that mirror the craft of the magician. Having set this broad perspective, the talk will then consider the detailed nature of the deception enacted in conjuring. I argue that we need to go beyond recent accounts of stage illusions by cognitive scientists that emphasize their basis in perceptual and attentional errors. Instead, a detailed analysis of conjuring tricks reveals a form of 'narrative failure' in which spectators are led to follow a particular (erroneous) story of events. The approach is illustrated through an analysis of a selected trick, Martin Gardner's 'Turnaround'. In considering the implications for people's interactions with technology, it will be shown how that this pattern of narrative failure depends on properties of artefacts, in particular symmetry and stable occlusion. I will conclude by discussing the possible implications of this form of narrative failure for the radical misconceptions that sometimes lie at the heart of industrial accidents.

Bio

Wally Smith is a Senior Lecturer in the Interaction Design Lab, Department of Computing and Information Systems at the University of Melbourne. His other current research projects are on the use of social media for smoking cessation, the design of mobile apps for student fieldwork, and the design of digital tools for citizen-produced history and heritage.


wsmith@unimelb.edu.au
http://people.eng.unimelb.edu.au/wsmith/



Ronald Poppe, Utrecht University – 29th April 2015

Title

Hands off! Playing games with your body

Abstract

The introduction of computer games has caused a drop in the amount of time children spend playing in a physically active way. We'd like to reverse the trend: by combining digital play and body movement, we aim at creating engaging and fun game experiences. I will present some of our research projects in which body and face motion is used to play games. The talk will focus on sensing technology, adaptive game play and social aspects of these games.

Bio

Ronald Poppe received the Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from the University of Twente, The Netherlands on the topic "Discriminative Vision-Based Recovery and Recognition of Human Motion". In 2009, 2010 and 2012, he was a visiting researcher at the Delft University of Technology, Stanford University and University of Lancaster, respectively. He is currently an assistant professor at Utrecht University. His research interests include the analysis of human motion from videos and other sensors, the understanding and modelling of human (communicative) behaviour and the applications of both in real-life settings.



Ben Cowan, University College Dublin – 25th March 2015

Title

Lexical alignment in human-computer communication: Audience Design or Priming?

Abstract

A common observation in dialogue research is that people tend to converge, or align, linguistically with their dialogue partners. Specifically, alignment at the lexical level has been shown to be influenced by our judgements of our interlocutor an as effective communication partner. As speech interfaces grow in popularity, the research presented looks at lexical alignment in the context of spoken human-computer dialogue, looking to understand the role of partner design and behaviour in this effect.

Our preliminary results show strong lexical alignment effects when communicating with computer partners, similar to those seenin human-human interaction, yet no significant partner modelling effects based on judgements impacted by voice anthropomorphism or partner comprehension behaviour. These findings give support to the notion that lexical alignment can be a a strong driver of word choice in human-computer dialogue. They also give tentative evidence for a priming based account in understanding why we align with automated dialogue partners.

Bio

Dr Benjamin Cowan is a Lecturer at Universty College Dublin's School of Information and Communication. His research broadly looks to understand how interface design affects user perceptions, emotions and behaviours in human-computer based interactions. His recent work has focused on how design and system actions affect user linguistic choices in human-computer dialogue as well as how to form, break and rebuild habits in interaction. He also has a strong interest in how negative emotions manifest in interaction and how these impact user behaviour.



Mike Byrne, Rice University – 24th March 2015

Title

The Butterfly Legacy: How badly-designed voting systems are as much a threat to election integrity as fraud and hacking

Abstract

Voting in the United States is unique in that local jurisdictions are responsible for administering all elections, including national elections. This has resulted in a wildly heterogeneous assortment of voting systems. The U.S. Presidential election in 2000 brought issues of voting system usability to the public consciousness via the “butterfly ballot” and ubiquitous media coverage of hanging chads. This prompted federal legislation that led to widespread adoption of electronic voting systems. However, fundamental questions about voting system usability were not answered before this sweeping change: Just how usable were the technologies being replaced? How do new electronic systems compare to those systems? How do security concerns about electronic voting factor in? We now have data that help answer some of these questions but which raise serious concerns about the systems used to implement American democracy. Errors rates larger than the margin of victory in some races appear at multiple points in the voting process, and this problem is likely to persist and possibly worsen without concerted efforts from multiple sources, including the HCI community.

Bio

Mike Byrne is a Professor of Psychology and Computer Science at Rice University. His primary research areas are concerned with usability of technological systems and mathematical/computational models of human cognition and performance with a strong interest in understanding human error. This includes basic scientific work on theories of human cognition and performance as well as applied usability testing efforts, particularly in the area of voting. His research has been funded by the NSF, NASA, the Office of Naval Research, and NIST. Mike received a B.S. in Engineering and a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Michigan in 1991. The Georgia Institute of Technology awarded him an M.S. in Psychology in 1993, an M.S. in Computer Science in 1995, and a Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology in 1996. He has served as an associate editor for the journals Human Factors and Cognitive Science, as well as serving on the editorial boards of the journals Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making, and Human Factors.



Danaë Stanton Fraser, University of Bath – 18th March 2015

Title

Towards humans and robots in public space

Abstract

I will start my talk by providing a brief overview of current projects within the CREATE Lab. I will then focus on our work within the EPSRC Being There project. Being There is examining the social and technological aspects of being able to appear in public in proxy forms. Our work at Bath is particularly exploring trust in communication. I will discuss a recent study we carried out on tele- present handshaking and also the involvement of a creative cohort as part of our impact plan throughout the project.

Bio

Danaë Stanton Fraser is a Professor in Psychology at the University of Bath where she leads the CREATE Lab http://www.bath.ac.uk/psychology/research/castl/create-lab/. Her research interests include the design and evaluation of mobile and pervasive technologies, spatial learning and identity and trust. Danaë’s work is underpinned by a process of co-design with end users and industrial partners in the development and evaluation of technologies. Danaë has obtained grants from the EPSRC, ESRC, AHRC, charities and industry and has held joint research grants with industrial partners including: BBC, Microsoft, Vodafone, IBM, ScienceScope, Nokia, HP and BT. She is currently an investigator on the AHRC REACT Hub; the EPSRC Being There project and the EPSRC SuperID project. She has published over seventy papers in high-impact international journals and conferences.



Raymond Bond, Ulster University – 11th March 2015

Title

Human Computer Interaction in Healthcare: Current Work and Opportunities

Abstract

This presentation will provide an overview of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) research studies that have been carried out by Ulster University.  The presentation will focus on HCI research within the healthcare domain. At Ulster, we have developed HCI systems for patients to encourage the self-management of chronic diseases as well as interactive user interfaces for medical professionals. We believe optimal HCI in healthcare can help both the patient and the physician. 1) The patient will only likely engage with good HCI (for example – if they are required to continuously record their own vital signs in the home – currently branded as connected health) and 2) the physician can make better decisions more efficiently and accurately with optimal HCI. As a result of our recent studies in this area, we are launching a commercial User Experience Laboratory (UX-Lab), which will allow enterprises to empirically evaluate their products using state of the art usability testing equipment which entail psycho-physiology sensors (eye tracking, electro-dermal activity, heart rate variability etc.) to derive biometrics for objectively determining the user experience. In addition to evaluating the usability of medical devices and software, we have also evaluated the usability of medical (diagnostic) images and signals. For example, we recorded the eye gaze and scan path of world leading cardiologists whilst they read the 12-lead electrocardiogram and we have also analysed eye gaze patterns from radiographers whilst they interpreted X-RAY images. Such studies will be discussed in this presentation. In summary, I will provide a brief overview of previous work and make predictions about future HCI research in healthcare (which may include natural and intelligent [adaptive] user interfaces for the patient, nurse and the doctor).

Bio

Dr Raymond Bond obtained a first class honours degree (BSc) in Interactive Multimedia Design (2007) and a PhD in Computing Science (2012) both from the Faculty of Computing and Engineering at Ulster University. He also holds a postgraduate certificate in higher education practice.  Dr Bond lectures in Health Informatics and Computer Graphics and Animation. He is a member of the Smart Environment Research Group (serg.ulster.ac.uk) and has scientific research interests in intelligent Human Computer Interaction, Usability Engineering, Medical Visualisation, Virtual Simulation Based Training in Medicine and Computerised Electrocardiography.



Saskia Bakker, Eindhoven University of Technology – 4th March 2015

Title

Design for Peripheral Interaction

Abstract

Interactive devices such as mobile phones play an important, but often needlessly obtrusive role in everyday life. This can be prevented when people could interact with these devices without focused attention. This talk will address ‘peripheral interaction design’: interaction design which can effortlessly be used as part of people’s everyday routines without inappropriately attracting attention.

Bio

Saskia Bakker is an assistant professor at the Industrial Design department of the Eindhoven University of Technology. In 2013, she obtained her PhD, on her dissertation entitled "Design for Peripheral Interaction", from the Eindhoven University of Technology. With a background in industrial design, her expertise lays in research-through-design in the areas of tangible interaction, peripheral interaction and classroom technologies. She will work as a visiting research at UCLIC from March 2015 until June 2015.



Tony Easty, University Health Network/University of Toronto – 18th February 2015

Title

The Development of a Human Factors-Informed Approach to Improving Health Care Safety in Canada

Abstract

In this talk, I will trace the origins of the application of human factors methods to issues of patient safety in health care in Canada, giving the background to safety issues and the gradual introduction of a human factors-informed approach in several jurisdictions. I will provide examples of projects that have been undertaken and will talk about the spectrum of activities presently underway.

Bio

Anthony (Tony) Easty is a Senior Scientist and the Inaugural Chair-holder of the Baxter Chair in Health Technology at the University Health Network/University of Toronto.  He is also an associate professor at the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical engineering at the university and chair of the management committee for the Centre for Global eHealth Innovation.  Since 1978, he has served in many capacities including Senior Director for the University Health Network’s Department of Medical Engineering and Director of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto.  

For the past seven years, Dr. Easty’s research focus has been the usability and safety of medical technologies throughout the health care system in a wide variety of environments of use, with a special focus on medication safety and safety in home care. These research activities are supported by a wide range of funding agencies.  He has established the HumanEra Team, educated at the PhD and Masters levels in human factors engineering, cognitive psychology and biomedical engineering.



Kristina Höök, KTH – 11th February 2015

Title

Designing for Somaesthetics

Video

Abstract

Somaesthetics is the study and understanding of how to improve our bodily, or somatic, agency [1]. We need to focus on; become more aware of, train and find a sensory-aesthetic appreciation, similar to how we must study any other subject at which we want to excel. Certain movements, brought about through critically aware somatic training, are good for us. This concept, relatively new to HCI, looks at our bodies as the centre of our experiential existence and looks at design, from the perspective of providing for better bodily experiences, ones which do not harm our bodies, but rather allow for fuller and more pleasurable experiences and interactions.  With the shift towards wearable technologies together with a renewed interest in the role of the human body in interaction (most notable perhaps through technologies such as Wii-motes or Kinect), we have, together with IKEA, engaged in the possible bodily experiences we can design for. By designing applications with an explicit focus on aesthetics, somaesthetics, empathy with ourselves and others, we aim to move beyond treating our bodies as mere input-output machines, using impoverished interaction modalities, towards richer, more meaningful interactions based on our human ways of living in the world. We are interested in the full range of rich body-/movement-based experiences, as they unfold over time that new technologies and infrastructure may enable.

[1] https://www.interaction-design.org/encyclopedia/somaesthetics.html

Bio

Kristina Höök is a professor in Interaction Design at the Royal Institute of Technology and also works part-time at SICS (Swedish Institute of Computer Science). She is the director of the Mobile Life centre. Höök has published numerous journal papers, books and book chapters, and conference papers in highly renowned venues. A frequent keynote speaker, she is known for her work on social navigation, seamfulness, mobile services, affective interaction and lately, designing for bodily engagement in interaction through somaesthetics. Her competence lies mainly in interaction design and user studies helping to form design.  She has obtained numerous national and international grants, awards, and fellowships including the Cor Baayen Fellowship by ERCIM (European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics), the INGVAR award and she is an ACM Distinguished Scientist. She has been listed as one of the 50 most influential IT-women in Sweden every year since 2008. She is an elected member of Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA).



John Rooksby, University of Glasgow – 21st January 2015

Title

Mobile Devices in Everyday Use

Abstract

Mobile phones and other digital devices have, for many, become a mundane part of everyday life. They are used frequently throughout the day, often in brief snatches, and often in forgettable ways that are embedded within the goings-on of everyday life. In this talk I will outline a study in which we have been collecting log data about how people use mobile devices. The log data we collect includes what times devices are unlocked and locked, what apps are launched, and when a device is being charged. I will describe issues in making sense of this log data, and explain why it is important to couple data collection with qualitative enquiry. I will describe two qualitative components of our work: firstly interview studies with people who have used our loggers, and secondly a video study in which we observed how people used their mobile devices while watching TV in their homes.

Bio

John Rooksby is a Research Associate in Computing at Glasgow University. He holds a PhD in Computer Science from Manchester University. He is interested in the human aspects of software development and use. His current research concerns how and why people engage with mobile apps and hardware, and how developers can identify and support patterns of use.



Tom Rodden, University of Nottingham –14th January 2015

Title

Unremarkable infrastructures: From Home Networks to Smart Grids

Abstract

We are familiar in HCI with designing novel user experiences that are stimulation entertaining and engaging. However, this talk will not be about entertainment or excitement. Rather I wish to focus on the mundane and how we think of supporting user interaction with the increasingly complex digital systems infrastructures that surround us. These infrastructures are increasingly interwoven with our everyday activities as we share the world we inhabit with a diverse set of digital devices. However, these infrastructures have changed very changed little and are still reliant on protocols and approaches that were established in the early days of the Internet although the context of use and the expectations of those who would use it are radically altered.

Reconsidering our digital infrastructure is a major intra-disciplinary challenge for computing. In this talk I wish to start by exploring the challenges currently faced in the effective management of home networks as an example of the need for HCI to work more closely with colleagues in the systems community to balance the current set of technical drivers with broader user oriented infrastructures highlighting how understanding of users can be used to make significant changes to the underlying infrastructure.

Envisioning a future smart infrastructure that draws upon user activities present an equally significant challenge that requires a close partnership across computing. Drawing upon our work on autonomous systems I wish to consider how we might engage users with an infrastructure that is yet to exist and solicit their views in order to help shape it.

Finally, I will conclude a number of critical challenges that need to be addressed if we are to really develop infrastructures that are unexciting, dull and unremarkable.

Bio

Tom Rodden (rodden.info) is a Professor of Interactive Computing at the University of Nottingham. His research brings together a range of human and technical disciplines, technologies and techniques to tackle the human, social, ethical and technical challenges involved in ubiquitous computing and the increasing used of personal data. He co-directs the Mixed Reality Laboratory (www.mrl.nott.ac.uk) an interdisciplinary research facility that is home of a team of over 70 researchers. He founded and currently co-directs the Horizon Digital Economy Research Institute (www.horizon.ac.uk). He has previously directed the EPSRC Equator IRC (www.equator.ac.uk) a national interdisciplinary research collaboration exploring the place of digital interaction in our everyday world. He is a fellow of the British Computer Society and was elected to the ACM SIGCHI Academy in 2009 and is a Fellow of the ACM.



Mark-Alexander Sujan, Warwick University – 3rd December 2014

Title

Studies of Resilience in Healthcare: Clinical Handover and Organisational Learning

Abstract

In this seminar I will describe two examples of research projects around resilience in healthcare.  The first research project investigated clinical handover in the emergency care setting (funded by the NIHR HS&DR programme).  I will explore how practitioners adapt their behaviour through dynamic trade-offs in order to manage competing organisational priorities.  The second research project developed and evaluated a proactive tool for organisational learning based on staff narratives and staff surveys (funded by the Health Foundation).  This tool is an example of how useful learning can be generated from ordinary, everyday clinical events rather than from extraordinary failures.     


Relevant publications for these projects:

  • Sujan M, Chessum P, Rudd M et al.  Managing competing organizational priorities in clinical handover across organizational boundaries.  J Health Services Research & Policy 2014 (in press)
  • Sujan M, Spurgeon P, Inada-Kim M, Rudd M, Fitton L, Horniblow S, et al. Clinical handover within the emergency care pathway and the potential risks of clinical handover failure (ECHO): primary research. Health Serv Deliv Res. 2014;2(5).
  • Sujan MA, Chessum P, Rudd M, Fitton L, Inada-Kim M, Spurgeon P, et al. Emergency Care Handover (ECHO study) across care boundaries: the need for joint decision making and consideration of psychosocial history. Emergency Medicine Journal. Online First September 11, 2013.
  • Sujan MA. A novel tool for organisational learning and its impact on safety culture in a hospital dispensary. Reliability Engineering & System Safety. 2012;101:21-34.
  • Sujan MA, Ingram C, McConkey T, Cross S, Cooke MW. Hassle in the dispensary: pilot study of a proactive risk monitoring tool for organisational learning based on narratives and staff perceptions. BMJ Quality & Safety. 2011 Jun;20(6):549-56.

Bio

Mark Sujan is Associate Professor of Patient Safety at Warwick Medical School.



Barry Brown, Stockholm University – 26th November 2014

Title

On the iPhone: studying the co-present use of mobile devices

Abstract

Over the last three years we have collected hundred of hours of recordings of mobile device use in diverse settings. We have recorded drivers using GPS to navigate, iPhone use recorded with wearable cameras, and remote recordings of mobile phone screens with ambient audio. These videos let us document how mobile devices have become threaded into diverse worlds of activity and how reliant we have become on our mobile devices.  In this talk I will focus on the interaction and talk around mobile devices, arguing that this can be as important as interaction with mobile devices. A web search might be shared with a friend, GPS's instructions can become the subject of a joke, or the composition of a text message discussed with a partner. Our videos let us see how conversations are influenced by mobile devices, through providing topics and interruptions, but also how device use is co-ordinared to fit with conversation, such as showing or narrating on phone activity.

Bio

Barry is a professor in Human Computer Interaction at the University of Stockholm, and is the Research Director of the Mobile Life VINN Excellence centre.  His recent work has focused on the sociology and design of leisure technologies - computer systems for leisure and pleasure. In over 100 publications he has discussed activities as diverse as games, tourism, museum visiting, the use of maps, television watching and sport spectating. He recently co-edited the Sage handbook of digital technology research, and his new book titled “Enjoying Machines” is out next year with MIT press.



Sam Gilbert, University College London – 19th November 2014

Title

Strategic ‘offloading’ of delayed intentions into the external environment

Abstract

In everyday life, we frequently use external tools such as diaries and smartphone reminders to help us to remember delayed intentions. In this way, our intentions are represented in distributed systems extending beyond our brains and bodies. However, surprisingly, there has been little empirical research into the causes and consequences of ‘intention offloading’. In this talk I will present a series of studies - using online web-based tasks and functional neuroimaging - to address these questions. These studies show that participants are highly sensitive to task demands when deciding whether or not to offload their intentions, and point to a critical influence of metacognitive confidence evaluations. Understanding these factors can lead to efficient design of artefacts to promote behavioural independence.

Bio

Sam Gilbert completed his PhD and postdoctoral research at the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and is now a Royal Society University Research Fellow. He has also worked at New York University. His main research interests are the cognitive neuroscience of executive functions, prospective memory, and social cognition, and the functional architecture of human frontal lobes

Homepage: samgilbert.net



Carolyn Canfield, University of British Columbia – 12th November 2014

Title

Experience based co-design for system transformation led by older persons moving in, out of and across Ontario’s healthcare system

Abstract

Experience based co-design mobilizes the unique expertise of patients, their families and carers for healthcare improvement. The clients of care systems can best identify needs and direct development for successful solutions to close service gaps and improve outcomes that matter to patients.

Is it really possible to defer to those dependent on care to identify priorities for transformation, prepare specifications for technological aids and then co-produce innovative design, development, testing, implementation, evaluation and spread? If you’re not involving the end user in your technological solution, you are likely missing the problem.

Within the context of Canadian healthcare, with its similarities and contrasts to the NHS, Ontario's Northumberland PATH project is empowering 300 older persons with complex health conditions to reflect, redefine and reconfigure health services using technology to assist. Patient pursuit of wellbeing crosses system silos and targets user-identified drivers for an improved quality of life. I’ll introduce you to this innovative project’s origins, realization and achievement as a leading model of experience-based co-design that is rapidly implementing customer-led health delivery. Yes, there’s an app for that!

Bio

Carolyn Canfield is an independent citizen-patient collaborating with healthcare teams, patients, families and provider organizations to embed the patient voice in improvement processes. She champions patient expertise as the creativity driver for system transformation, aiming to fulfill the aspirations of clients and practitioners for care excellence. Her energetic full-time commitment arises from premature widowhood in 2008 following preventable harm. She has recently accepted an appointment as honorary lecturer in the Department of Family Practice, Faculty of Medicine, at the University of British Columbia. Carolyn has just been named Canada's inaugural Patient Safety Champion by the Canadian Patient Safety Institute and Accreditation Canada.

For more information ca.linkedin.com/pub/carolyn-canfield/23/a5/b54/

You can download the slides of this presentation here.



Neil Maiden, City University London – 29th October 2014

Title

Computer Science Research to Support the Residential Care of Older People with Dementia

Abstract

Caring for older people with dementia has become a strategic national challenge, yet it continues to be afforded low social status, and has high staff turnover and numbers of inexperienced carers. Increasing the quality of care given in such constraining environments has become a pressing issue, and digital technologies have capabilities to support the delivery of increased care quality at reasonable cost. However, there has been little computer science research dedicated to support delivery of this care. In particular, digital technologies can be applied to support person-centred care, a paradigm that seeks an individualised approach and recognises the uniqueness of each resident and understanding the world from the perspective of the person with dementia. This seminar will report recent research that has developed computerised support for two tasks to deliver person-centred care - creativity and reflective learning. It will report the development of new descriptive models of creative thinking and reflection in care that informed technology development, then describe three new software solutions to support creative thinking and reflection learning by carers for people with dementia: (i) technology-based serious games to train care staff in person-centred care techniques; (ii) digital life history apps that provide interactive support for reflective learning and creative thinking about daily resident care, and; (iii) a new mobile app to provide creative support for resolving challenging behaviours. Each app will be presented, and results from evaluations of each in different care settings will be summarised.

Bio

Neil Maiden is Professor of Systems Engineering at City University London. He is and has been a principal and co-investigator on numerous EPSRC- and EU-funded research projects with a total value of £30million. He has published over 160 peer-reviewed papers in academic journals, conferences and workshops proceedings. He was Program Chair for the 12th IEEE International Conference on Requirements Engineering in Kyoto in 2004, and was Editor of the IEEE Software’s Requirements column from 2005 to 2013. Since 2010 he has been leading computing research dedicated to support the residential care of older people with dementia.



Robert J.K. Jacob, Tufts University and UCL Interaction Centre – 22nd October 2014

Title

Reality-Based Interaction, Next Generation User Interfaces, and Brain-Computer Interfaces

Abstract

I will begin with the notion of Reality-Based Interaction (RBI) as a unifying concept that ties together a large subset of the emerging generation of new, non-WIMP user interfaces.  It attempts to connect current paths of research in HCI and to provide a framework that can be used to understand, compare, and relate these new developments. Viewing them through the lens of RBI can provide insights for designers and allow us to find gaps or opportunities for future development.  I will briefly discuss some past work in my research group on a variety of next generation interfaces such as tangible interfaces and eye movement-based interaction techniques. Then I will discuss our current work on brain-computer interfaces and the more general area of implicit interaction.

Bio

Robert Jacob is a Professor of Computer Science at Tufts University, where his research interests are new interaction modes and techniques and user interface software; his current work focuses on adaptive brain-computer interfaces. He is currently a visiting professor at the University College London Interaction Centre; he has also been visiting professor at the Universite Paris-Sud and at the MIT Media Laboratory.  Before coming to Tufts, he was in the Human-Computer Interaction Lab at the Naval Research Laboratory.  He received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University, and he is a member of the editorial boards of Human-Computer Interaction and the International Journal of Human-Computer Studies and a founding member for ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction.  He is Vice-President of ACM SIGCHI, and he has served as Papers Co-Chair of the CHI and UIST conferences, and Co-Chair of UIST and TEI.  He was elected to the ACM CHI Academy in 2007, an honorary group of the principal leaders of the field of HCI, whose efforts have shaped the discipline and industry, and have led research and innovation in human-computer interaction.



Rebecca Fiebrink, Goldsmiths, University of London – 15th October 2014

Title

Interactive Machine Learning for End-User Systems Building in Music Composition & Performance

Abstract

I build, study, teach about, and perform with new human-computer interfaces for real-time digital music performance. Much of my research concerns the use of supervised learning as a tool for musicians, artists, and composers to build digital musical instruments and other real-time interactive systems. Through the use of training data, these algorithms offer composers and instrument builders a means to specify the relationship between low-level, human-generated control signals (such as the outputs of gesturally-manipulated sensor interfaces, or audio captured by a microphone) and the desired computer response (such as a change in the parameters driving computer-generated audio). The task of creating an interactive system can therefore be formulated not as a task of writing and debugging code, but rather one of designing and revising a set of training examples that implicitly encode a target function, and of choosing and tuning an algorithm to learn that function.

In this talk, I will provide a brief introduction to interactive computer music and the use of supervised learning in this field. I will show a live musical demo of the software that I have created to enable non-computer-scientists to interactively apply standard supervised learning algorithms to music and other real-time problem domains. This software, called the Wekinator, supports human interaction throughout the entire supervised learning process, including the generation of training data by real-time demonstration and the evaluation of trained models through hands-on application to real-time inputs.

Drawing on my work with users applying the Wekinator to real-world problems, I'll discuss how data-driven methods can enable more effective approaches to building interactive systems, through supporting rapid prototyping and an embodied approach to design, and through “training” users to become better machine learning practitioners. I'll also discuss some of the remaining challenges at the intersection of machine learning and human-computer interaction that must be addressed for end users to apply machine learning more efficiently and effectively, especially in interactive contexts.

Bio

Rebecca Fiebrink is a Lecturer in Graphics and Interaction at Goldsmiths, University of London. As both a computer scientist and a musician, she is interested in creating and studying new technologies for music composition and performance. Much of her current work focuses on applications of machine learning to music: for example, how can machine learning algorithms help people to create new digital musical instruments by supporting rapid prototyping and a more embodied approach to design? How can these algorithms support composers in creating real-time, interactive performances in which computers listen to or observe human performers, then respond in musically appropriate ways? She is interested both in how techniques from computer science can support new forms of music-making, and in how applications in music and other creative domains demand new computational techniques and bring new perspectives to how technology might be used and by whom.

Fiebrink is the developer of the Wekinator system for real-time interactive machine learning, and she frequently collaborates with composers and artists on digital media projects. She has worked extensively as a co-director, performer, and composer with the Princeton Laptop Orchestra, which performed at Carnegie Hall and has been featured in the New York Times, the Philadelphia Enquirer, and NPR's All Things Considered. She has worked with companies including Microsoft Research, Sun Microsystems Research Labs, Imagine Research, and Smule, where she helped to build the #1 iTunes app “I am T-Pain.“ Recently, Rebecca has enjoyed performing as the principal flutist in the Timmins Symphony Orchestra, as the keyboardist in the University of Washington computer science rock band “The Parody Bits,“ and as a laptopist in the Princeton-based digital music ensemble, Sideband. She holds a PhD in Computer Science from Princeton University and a Master's in Music Technology from McGill University



Katja Hofmann, Microsoft Research – 8th October 2014

Abstract

Query Auto Completion (QAC) suggests possible queries to web search users from the moment they start entering a query.

This popular feature of web search engines is thought to reduce physical and cognitive effort when formulating a query. Perhaps surprisingly, despite QAC being widely used, users’ interactions with it are poorly understood. This paper begins to address this gap. We present the results of an in-depth user study of user interactions with QAC in web search. While study participants completed web search tasks, we recorded their interactions using eye-tracking and client-side logging. This allows us to provide a first look at how users interact with QAC. We specifically focus on the effects of QAC ranking, by controlling the quality of the ranking in a within-subject design.

We identify a strong position bias that is consistent across ranking conditions. Due to this strong position bias, ranking quality affects QAC usage. We also find an effect on task completion, in particular on the number of result pages visited. We show how these effects can be explained by a combination of searchers’ behavior patterns, namely monitoring or ignoring QAC, and searching for spelling support or complete queries to express a search intent. We conclude the paper with a discussion of the important implications of our findings for QAC evaluation.

Bio

Dr. Katja Hofmann is a postdoctoral researcher in the Machine Learning and Perception group at Microsoft Research Cambridge. Her research focuses on online evaluation and online learning, with the goal of developing interactive systems that learn directly from their users. This work is highly interdisciplinary, and brings together and expands insights from information retrieval, reinforcement learning, and human-computer interaction.



Duncan Brumby, UCL Interaction Centre – 1st October 2014

Title:

Improving the everyday interactions with your phone, and maybe medical devices too

Abstract:

Smartphones are a pretty big deal. Many of us now begin our day with our phone’s alarm clock. On the way to work we read email while listening to music. We use our phone to navigate novel cities. At the end of the day, we relax by queuing up content on our phone to watch on a connected television. All of this is done on a small computer, which weighs the same as 12 coins, and has a tiny 4-inch screen. Smartphones are a pretty big deal. In this talk, I will describe our recent work that has investigated how low-level design decisions influence the way that people use and interact with their phone. First, I will consider how the auto-locking feature on a phone can dissuade users from regularly interleaving attention between other ongoing activities (Brumby & Seyedi, mobileHCI 2012). Second, I will consider how current generation smartphones handle incoming-calls, and explore alternatives to the dominate full-screen notification model, which forcibly interrupts whatever activity the user was already engaged in (Böhmer et al., CHI 2014). Finally, I will discuss our recent work investigating how people search for content on a display (Brumby et al., CHI 2014).

About the speaker:

Duncan Brumby is a Senior Lecturer at University College London working in the UCL Interaction Centre. He received his doctorate in Psychology from Cardiff University in 2005, after which he was a post-doc in Computer Science at Drexel University, until joining UCL in 2007. Dr. Brumby’s research has been published in leading HCI and Cognitive Science outlets. His work on multitasking has received best paper nominations at CHI (2014, 2012, 2007), and his work on interactive search is one of the most-cited articles from the Human-Computer Interaction journal 2008-2010. To support his work, Dr. Brumby has attracted funding from the EPSRC. He is Associate Editor for the International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, is an Associate Chair for the ACM CHI conference (2012-2015) and ACM mobileHCI conference (2012-2013).

Page last modified on 24 jun 13 10:27 by Harry J Griffin