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PRIME Trial Information

A study comparing bi-parametric MRI to multi-parametric MRI in the diagnosis of clinically significant prostate cancer.

A study comparing bi-parametric MRI to multi-parametric MRI in the diagnosis of clinically significant prostate cancer.

The standard way of diagnosing prostate cancer is to carry out a multiparametric MRI scan and targeted biopsy. This type of scan normally involves the insertion of a cannula in one of your veins, through which contrast is given.

Another type of MRI scan (biparametric) can be performed that does not require contrast, and therefore does not require the insertion of a cannula. We currently do not know for certain whether using this type of MRI will allow us to detect the same, more or less prostate cancer than if we use the standard (multiparametric) type of MRI. Current evidence supports the idea that using biparametric MRI may detect a similar amount of cancer to when it is not used but one advantage is it may allow a man to have a scan without contrast. Because the use of contrast comes with a risk of allergy and potential side effects, this would be an improvement over the standard (multiparametric) MRI if the scan was just as good in identifying suspicious parts of the prostate.

The main purpose of this study is to assess if biparametric MRI can provide similar information to multiparametric MRI. You will undergo a multiparametric MRI, which is the currently used method of investigating the prostate for cancer. The doctor reviewing your scan will be asked to review the MRI scan in a different order than they usually are to investigate whether biparametric MRI can offer the same degree of accuracy of detecting prostate cancer as multiparametric MRI. 

If you are an investigator interested in participating in the PRIME trial 

please complete the form below send it to veeru.kasi@ucl.ac.uk and p.khetrapal@ucl.ac.uk.

Chief Investigator: Mr Veeru Kasivisvanathan

University College London NCITA Trials group: Professor Caroline Moore, Dr Pramit Khetrapal, Dr Chris Brew-Graves, Professor Shonit Punwani

Key collaborators:

  • Statistics by University of Birmingham Test Evaluation Research Group, Dr Yemisi Takwoingi, Professor Jon Deeks
  • EAU Research Foundation: Dr Wim Witjes, Ms Christien Caris, Professor Anders Bjartell
  • Trial Network: PRECISION & START Consortium

Sponsor:  University College London (UCL)

Supported by: EAU Research Foundation