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Revisiting ‘Yugoslavia and After’: The contributors’ reflections thirty years on

25 June 2021, 2:00 pm–5:00 pm

Cover of the book Yugoslavia and After

Join this SSEES webinar to meet and hear the volume’s contributors as they reflect on their analysis and conclusions of the reasons for the dissolution of Yugoslavia.

This event is free.

Event Information

Open to

All

Availability

Yes

Cost

Free

Organiser

SSEES

25 June 2021 3-6pm CEST

The breakup of Yugoslavia started 30 years ago on 25 June 1991 with the so called ‘War in Slovenia’. In 1996, a group of scholars and journalists published a volume Yugoslavia and After: A Study in Fragmentation, Despair and Rebirth (Routledge, edited by Ivan Vejvoda and David Dyker) which tried to make sense of the breakup only four to five years into it. This was one of the first volumes of this type and thirty years since, this event is unique opportunity to discuss the break up of Yugoslavia in its light. Unfortunately, two contributors - David Dyker and Chris Cvijic – are not any more among us.

This webinar represents a unique occasion to meet and hear the volume’s contributors as they reflect on their analysis and conclusions of the reasons for the dissolution of Yugoslavia. It is an opportunity to learn both whether and where they got their earlier analysis right or wrong, and to which extent the remarkable degree of former consensus amongst the contributors regarding the future of the successor states, still holds. The webinar intends to be not only a lively and relevant exchange amongst the contributors about former Yugoslavia in the context of post-Yugoslav reality, but also an insightful debate about the power and limits of human inquiry and social sciences.

CONTRIBUTORS:

Ivan Vejvoda, is Co-Editor of Yugoslavia and After. Head Europe's Futures Project Institute for Human Sciences Vienna, prior to that: Senior VP German Marshall Fund of the US Washington DC, Executive Director Balkan Trust for Democracy, Senior Foreign Policy Adviser to PM of Serbia Zoran Djindjic, Research Fellow Sussex European Institute University of Sussex.

Dr Vesna Bojicic is Co-Director of UN Business and Human Security Initiative at LSE IDEAS  and an Associate fellow of the South East Europe Research Unit at the European Institute, at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She is an expert on the political economy of conflict and development with a particular interest in conflict-crime nexus, informal governance and the role of international aid in transitioning from conflict. Most recent project investigates private sector's contribution to peace and development in the context of Agenda 2030.  She holds PhD in Economics and MA in Economic development.

Slavo RadosevicProfessor at UCL SSSEES. Formerly Assistant Director in the Republic Planning Office of Croatia, Senior Fellow at the Institute of Economics Zagreb, Federal Secretary for Development in the SFRY Government of PM Markovic, Senior Research Fellow at SPRU Sussex University, Deputy Director of the UCL SSEES. https://slavoradosevic.com/

Xavier Bougarel is a researcher at the Center for Ottoman, Turkish, Balkan and Central Asian Studies (CETOBaC) in Paris. He is, among others, the author of "Islam and nationhood in Bosnia-Herzegovina" (Bloomsbury, 2018) and one of the editors of "The New Bosnian Mosaic. Identities, Memories and Moral Claims in a Post-War Society" (Ashgate, 2007).

Susan L. Woodward is Professor of Political Science at the Graduate Center, City University of New York.  Author of Socialist Unemployment: Political Economy of Yugoslavia, 1945-1990; Balkan Tragedy: Chaos and Dissolution after the Cold War; and The Ideology of Failed States: Why Intervention FailsProfessor of Political Science at the Graduate Center, City University of New York.  Author of Socialist Unemployment: Political Economy of Yugoslavia, 1945-1990; Balkan Tragedy: Chaos and Dissolution after the Cold War; and The Ideology of Failed States: Why Intervention Fails.

Dr Jovan Teokarevic, Professor of Comparative Politics at the Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Belgrade (since 2002), Research fellow, Institute for European Studies, Belgrade (1981-2002); Visiting Professor: College of Europe, Warsaw (since 2016), University of Vienna (2009-2015), NATO Defense College (2001-2009); Head, Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies of the Balkans; former Chairman of the Board of the Open Society Foundation Serbia (2013-2019).

Ferid Muhic is Emeritus Professor at the International Balkan University in Skopje (North Macedonia). He is author of several books in philosophy, sociology, cultural theory and poetry. From 2016 he is the member of the Parliament of the Republic of North Macedonia.

Prof Frane Adam is a Slovenian sociologist, editor and former dissident political activist. During the early 1970s, he was one of the leaders of the student protest movement in the Socialist Republic of Slovenia. In the 1980s, he was active in the civil society movement in Slovenia and became one of the members of the Committee for the Defence of Human Rights. His research interest is focused on comparative studies of elites and democracy, on theories and indicators of developmental performance as well as on the impact of social capital on knowledge transfer and regional innovation systems He is currently the director of Institute for Developmental and Strategic Analysis where he is also Head of the Research Centre.

MODERATOR:

Anne White is M. B Grabowski Professor of Polish Studies and Social and Political Science at UCL SSEES. Her current research focuses on migration to and from Poland, but she also has a strong interest in ethnic and national identities across the post-communist region. Her publications include 'Kosovo, Ethnic Identity and “Border Crossings” in the The File on H and other novels by Ismail Kadare', in P. Wagstaff (ed.), Border Crossings: Mapping Identities in Modern Europe (Bern: Peter Lang, 2004), pp. 23-54.

EVENT MANAGER:

Patricia Gabalova Email: p.gabalova@ucl.ac.uk 

This webinar is organised by the UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies

Second edition