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UCL Department of Security and Crime Science

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Security and Crime Science BSc

The BSc in Security and Crime Science aims to create a generation of leaders in the crime, intelligence and security sectors.

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To find out core information about this degree, such as entry requirements, programme length and cost, visit the UCL prospectus site. You can also find the answers to applicants' most frequently asked questions by visiting the UCL Engineering Applicant Helpdesk (you can also get in touch with directly us via the helpdesk). 

Course information

Module information is available via the links below (pdf).

First year modules

In the first year you will take eight compulsory taught modules, worth 15 credits each.

Core modules

Field trips and other external learning opportunities

Not all of the teaching takes place in lecture theatres and classrooms: our students get the opportunity to go on field trips in London and the south east, and these experience enrich their learning and provide context to the theories and methods being taught. Below you can find out more about the external learning opportunities in the first year of the programme. N.B. these opportunities all involve external institutions and as such UCL has no control over the availability or accessibility of the visits: they are therefore not a compulsory or guaranteed part of the degree programme. 

Introduction to security and crime science
  • A field trip to the Metropolitan Police Training Centre at Hendon gives students the chance to see first-hand how police are trained to fulfil the increasingly demanding role that they must play in the 21st century.
  • A visit to the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) at Sandridge, allows students to hear from scientists and engineers who develop technological solutions to fight crime. During the visit, students see the latest technological developments in crime prevention and detection, including in digital investigation, surveillance, identity assurance, contraband detection, forensic sciences, and horizon scanning.
Crime mapping
  • A field trip to Greenwich Observatory brings to life the geographic coordinates that are central to understanding geographic data that the students use in the module. Through advancements in astronomy and navigation, longitude was devised at the Observatory – and the prime meridian passes through it. 
Crime and society
  • A field trip to The Old Bailey – London’s criminal court. There the students sit through live court proceedings in serious cases, and get to see legal arguments and presentation of evidence before the judge. They use the experience to discuss their theoretical learning in class, and understand the nuances of the criminal justice system.

Second year modules

In the second year you will take five compulsory taught modules. You will also take optional 2-3 modules. There are two combinations of optional modules for you to choose from. You must make choices from either Option One or Option Two: 

Option 1
  • Choice A: Either Organised crime OR Professional development
  • Choice B: Either Security technology and a project in security and crime prevention OR Forensic psychology and a project in investigative decision making OR Policing: theory and evidence and a project in policing
Option 2
  • Choice A: Either Security technology OR Forensic psychology OR Policing: theory and evidence 
  • Choice B: Professional practice

Core modules

Optional modules

Field trips and other external learning opportunities

In the second year, there are more external learning opportunities available. N.B. these opportunities all involve external institutions and as such UCL has no control over the availability or accessibility of the visits: they are therefore not a compulsory or guaranteed part of the degree programme. 

Preventing crimes
  • Students visit the UCL CCTV control room. This exposes students to how technology is used to prevent and detect crime and keep them safe on campus.
Introduction to research
  • A visit to the Wellcome Collection, to see how researchers in the medical domain design their research studies, what evidence they rely upon and if there are any learnings for Crime Science research.

Third year modules

You will choose two optional modules.

Core modules

Optional modules

Find out more and apply