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Centres for the UK Dementia Research Institute announced

The locations of the centres that complete the UK Dementia Research Institute (UK DRI), whose hub of research activity and operational headquarters is based at UCL, have been named as the University of Cambridge, Cardiff University, the University of Edinburgh, Imperial College London and King’s College London.

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Everyone has different 'bad spots' in their vision

The ability to distinguish objects in peripheral vision varies significantly between individuals, finds new research from UCL, Paris Descartes University and Dartmouth College, USA. For example, some people are better at spotting things above their centre of vision while others are better at spotting things off to the right.

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Satnavs 'switch off' parts of the brain

Using a satnav to get to your destination 'switches off' parts of the brain that would otherwise be used to simulate different routes, reveals new UCL research.

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Most effective vocabulary learning technique revealed

UCL and language learning app Memrise have announced the winner of the first 'Memprize', a competition to find the world’s most efficient and effective vocabulary learning technique.

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MRI scans can help spot HIV in the brain

Scientists at UCL have developed a way to use MRI scans to help identify when HIV is persisting in the brain despite effective drug treatment.

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UCL professors win The Brain Prize for 2017

The Brain Prize for 2017, worth €1m, has been awarded to Professor Peter Dayan (UCL Gatsby Computational Neuroscience Unit), Professor Ray Dolan (UCL Max Planck Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research) and Professor Wolfram Schultz (University of Cambridge) for their analysis of how the brain recognises and processes reward. The capacity to link reward to events and actions is the foundation of human and animal survival, and problems with processing rewards can lead to neurological and psychiatric disorders.

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Evidence of brain damage found in former footballers

Evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a potential cause of dementia caused by repeated blows to the head, has been found in the brains of former association football (soccer) players examined at the UCL Queen Square Brain Bank.

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Delirium could accelerate dementia-related mental decline

When hospitalised, people can become acutely confused and disorientated. This condition, known as delirium, affects a quarter of older patients and new research by UCL and University of Cambridge shows it may have long-lasting consequences, including accelerating the dementia process.

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New £250m UK Dementia Research Institute to be led from UCL

UCL has been selected as the 'hub' of the new £250m UK Dementia Research Institute (UK DRI), to be led by Professor Bart De Strooper, current leader of the Laboratory for the Research of Neurodegenerative Diseases at the University of Leuven and scientific director at VIB (Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie) in Belgium.

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Women with dementia receive less medical attention

Women with dementia have fewer visits to the GP, receive less health monitoring and take more potentially harmful medication than men with dementia, new UCL research reveals.

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Pain sensors specialised for specific sensations

Many pain-sensing nerves in the body are thought to respond to all types of ‘painful events’, but new UCL research in mice reveals that in fact most are specialised to respond to specific types such as heat, cold or mechanical pain.

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Blood vessels control brain growth

Blood vessels play a vital role in stem cell reproduction, enabling the brain to grow and develop in the womb, reveals new UCL research in mice.

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Older dogs better at learning new tricks

Older adolescents and adults can learn certain thinking skills including non-verbal reasoning more effectively than younger people, finds new UCL research.

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