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Professor Neeleman

Head of Research Department, Professor of Linguistics

Location: Room 110, Chandler House,
2 Wakefield Street, London WC1N 1PF
Telephone: +44 (0) 207 679 4045 (x24045)
Email: a.neeleman@ucl.ac.uk

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Research Interests

Background

The grammar of a natural language relates speech sounds and meaning. Theoretical linguistics concerns itself with the nature of that relation, the way it is acquired and the way it is represented in the mind. According to the theory of generative grammar, as developed by Noam Chomsky (MIT) and others since the 1950s, there is no direct mapping between sound and meaning. Rather, sentences have an autonomous syntactic structure that is mapped onto a phonological representation on the one hand, and a semantic representation on the other. The rule systems of phonology, syntax and semantics are argued to be largely innate; acquisition of a particular grammar involves specifying a value for a finite set of variables. My research adopts this general outlook; my area of expertise is the theory of syntax, and its interaction with other components of the language faculty.

Templates and building blocks

Much work in generative syntax assumes that sentence structure is a template with fixed positions that feed into the semantic interpretation and morphological realization of constituents. For example, a nominative constituent interpreted as agent starts out in a unique position associated with agentivity and is moved to a unique position where nominative case is licensed. The syntactic template is often taken to be a universal ordered set of functional projections; cross-linguistic variation in word order depends on the extent to which movement is reflected in phonology.

My own research rejects this templatic view of syntax. I believe that semantic relations such as ‘agent of’ and morphological properties such as nominative case can in principle be associated with a range of syntactic configurations. The syntax defines a limited set of rules of combination that determine how words can be put together, but there is no predetermined outcome: any structure consistent with the rules of combination is grammatical, as long as it can be successfully mapped to a phonological and semantic representation. In my view, this flexible ‘building block theory’ has a better chance of explaining language-internal and cross-linguistic language variation.

The empirical basis of flexibility

The case for the building block theory is partially based on the syntax of arguments. As a PhD student and later as a post-doc at Utrecht University, I was primarily concerned with secondary predication, scrambling and cross-linguistic variation in the placement of the object with respect to the verb. I argued that these phenomena are best analyzed by allowing objects and subjects to be base-generated in various positions. This conclusion, if correct, falsifies the templatic view of syntax. An initial formulation of the case for flexibility can be found in my dissertation. In cooperation with Fred Weerman (University of Amsterdam), I published a monograph on the syntax of arguments, Flexible Syntax (Kluwer, 1999), which complements many of the arguments given there.

The theoretical basis of flexibility

Since my appointment in London, I have worked with Hans van de Koot (UCL) on a theory of the rules of combination that make up the syntax. We argue that fundamental properties of syntactic dependencies (c-command, obligatoriness, uniqueness of the antecedent, non-uniqueness of the dependent and locality) can be derived from two basic assumptions: a strict version of Chomsky’s inclusiveness condition and a claim about the way in which information in nodes is organized. The resulting theory is outlined in ‘The Configurational Matrix’ (Linguistic Inquiry, 2002). One important consequence of our proposal is that grammars based on it are inherently flexible: they lack the machinery required to identify any position as uniquely associated with, say, agentivity or nominative case. So, to the extent that our approach is on the right track, flexibility is not just an attractive empirical hypothesis, but implied by fundamental properties of the syntax.

My interest in optimality theory, as developed by Alan Prince (Rutgers University) and Paul Smolensky (Johns Hopkins), has a similar background. According to this theory well-formed sentences maximally satisfy a ranked set of violable universal constraints. Maximal satisfaction, however, does not mean non-violation. Therefore, optimality theory implies what one might call ‘higher-order flexibility’: constraints that would guarantee rigidity in other frameworks could be violated in certain well-defined circumstances. I have explored optimality-theoretic analyses of various phenomena in joint work with Peter Ackema (University of Edinburgh).

Interface conditions

The main challenge to flexible approaches to syntax is to explain rigidity where it is attested (for example in the case of strict word order). Much of my work is devoted to showing that rigidity can be derived from the interaction between syntax and syntax-external systems. I believe that explanations along these lines are not just forced by the theoretical choices I have made, but in some cases superior to alternatives based on a fundamentally rigid syntax.

In my dissertation, I argue that adjacency conditions (such as the one that holds of English verbs and their nominal complements) result from the interaction of syntax and prosody. This claim is developed in more detail in Flexible Syntax, and in ‘Floating Quantifiers and English VP Structure’ (with Vikki Janke). The general idea of syntactic flexibility reigned in by PF constraints also underlies much of the argumentation in Beyond Morphology (OUP, 2004), a monograph on interface conditions on word formation co-authored by Peter Ackema.

In further work with Peter Ackema, and more recently with Klaus Abels (Tromsø), I have argued against the anti-symmetry of syntax and in favour of the view that sister nodes can be reordered, either within a single language or cross-linguistically. From this symmetrical perspective it is surprising that there are very strict locality conditions that hold of rightward movement (whereas leftward movement can span much larger distances). We argue that this asymmetry follows from the interaction of the syntax and the psycholinguistic system of sentence processing.

Finally, in work with Hans van de Koot and Jenny Doetjes, I argue that restrictions on the stacking of degree expressions like more and too receive an explanation in the mapping from syntax to semantics.

Research Projects


I am currently involved in various projects that further develop the program of research outlined above.

With Hans van de Koot, I am working on a monograph that analyzes free word order phenomena in Dutch, German and Japanese in terms of the theory of grammatical dependencies in ‘The Configurationa Matrix’.

With Michael Brody, Kriszta Szendrői and Reiko Vermeulen and Hans van de Koot, I am involved in an AHRC-funded project on topic and focus movement (a description can be found here).

Finally, I am carrying out two smaller research projects on pro drop in languages like Japanese and Chinese (with Kriszta Szendrői), and in Early Modern Dutch (with Peter Ackema).

 

    2013

    2012

    • Neeleman, A. D., Kucerova, I. (Eds.) (2012). Contrasts and Positions in Information Structure. Cambridge University Press.
    • Neeleman, A. D., Vermeulen, R. (Eds.) (2012). The Syntax of Topic, Focus, and Contrast. Walter de Gruyter.
    • Abels, K., Neeleman, A. (2012). Linear Asymmetries and the LCA. Syntax 15(1), 25-74
    • Janke, V., Neeleman, A. (2012). Ascending and Descending VPs in English. LINGUISTIC INQUIRY 43(2), 151-190 Author URL
    • Neeleman, A. D., Vermeulen, R. (2012). Editor of: Types of focus and their interaction with negation. In neeleman, A. D., Vermeulen, R. (Eds.). The syntax of topic, focus and contrast: an interface-based approach ( pp.227-264). Berlin, Germany/Boston, US De Gruyter Mouton.
    • van de Koot, H., Neeleman, A. (2012). Editor of: Towards a Unified Encoding of Contrast and Scope. In Neeleman, A., Vermeulen, R. (Eds.). The Syntax of Topic, Focus and Contrast: An Interface-Based Approach ( ). Mouton. [Accepted]
    • van de Koot, H., Neeleman, A. (2012). The Linguistic Expression of Causation. In Everaert, M., Siloni, T., Marelj, M. (Eds.). The Theta System: Argument Structure at the Interface ( pp.20-51). Oxford Oxford University Press. [Accepted]

    2011

    • VAN DE KOOT, J., Neeleman, A. (2011). The Linguistic Expression of Causation. Oxford University Press. Author URL [Accepted]

    2010

    • Abels, K., Neeleman, A. (2010). Nihilism masquerading as progress. Lingua 120, 2657-2660 doi:10.1016/j.lingua.2010.03.008.
    • Matzig, S., Druks, J., Neeleman, A., Craig, G. (2010). Spared syntax and impaired spell-out: The case of prepositions. J NEUROLINGUIST 23(4), 354-382 doi:10.1016/j.jneuroling.2010.02.002.
    • Matzig, S., Druks, J., Neeleman, A., Craig, G. (2010). Spared syntax and impaired spell-out: The case of prepositions. Journal of Neurolinguistics 23, 354-382 doi:10.1016/j.neuroling.2010.02.002.
    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, H. (2010). A Local Encoding of Syntactic Dependencies and Its Consequences for the Theory of Movement. Syntax 13(4), 331-372 doi:10.1111/j.1467-9612.2010.00143.x. Author URL
    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, H. (2010). Information-structural restrictions on (A)over-bar-scrambling. The Linguistic Review 27, 365-385 doi:10.1515/tlir.2010.014.
    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, H. (2010). Theoretical Validity and Psychological Reality of the Grammatical Code. In Everaert, M., Lentz, T., De Mulder, H., Nilsen, Ø., Zondervan, A. (Eds.). The Linguistics Enterprise: From Knowledge of Language to knowledge in Linguistics ( pp.183-212). Amsterdam John Benjamins.

    2009

    • Abels, A., Neeleman, A. (2009). Universal 20 without the LCA. In Brucart, J. M., Gavarro, A., Sola, J. (Eds.). Merging features: Computation, interpretation, and acquisition ( pp.60-79). Oxford Oxford University Press.
    • Abels, K., Neeleman, A. (2009). Linear Asymmetries and the LCA (under submission).
    • Neeleman, A., Titov, E. (2009). Focus, Contrast, and Stress in Russian. Linguistic Inquiry 40(3), 514-524
    • Neeleman, A., Titov, E., van de Koot, H., Vermeulen, R. (2009). A syntactic typology of topic, focus and contrast. In Van Craenenbroeck, J. (Ed.). Alternatives to Cartography ( pp.15-52). Berlin Mouton de Gruyter.
    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, H. (2009). Scope Inversion (under submission). Author URL
    • Neeleman, A., Weerman, F. (2009). Syntactic effects of morphological case. In Malchukov, A., Spencer, A. (Eds.). The Oxford handbook of case ( pp.276-289). Oxford Oxford University Press.

    2008

    • Neeleman, A., Szendroi, K. (2008). Case morphology and radical pro-drop. In Biberauer, T. (Ed.). The limits of syntactic variation ( pp.331-348). Amsetrdam/Philadelphia John Benjamins.
    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, H. (2008). Dutch scrambling and the nature of discourse templates. The Journal of Comparative Germanic Linguistics 11(2), 137-189 doi:10.1007/s10828-008-9018-0. Author URL

    2007

    • Ackema, P., Neeleman, A. (2007). Morphology ? Syntax. In G. Ramchand and C. Reiss (eds.). In Ramchand, G., Reiss, C. (Eds.). Oxford Handbook of Linguistic Interfaces ( pp.325-352). Oxford Oxford University Press.
    • Ackema, P., Neeleman, A. (2007). Restricted pro drop in Early Modern Dutch. The Journal of Comparative Germanic Linguistics 10(2), 81-107 doi:10.1007/s10828-007-9010-0. Author URL
    • Neeleman, A., Szendroi, K. (2007). Radical pro drop and the morphology of pronouns. Linguistic Inquiry 38(4), 671-714 doi:10.1162/ling.2007.38.4.671.
    • Neeleman, N., Titov, E., van de Koot, H., Vermeulen, R. (2007). A Syntactic Typology of Topic, Focus and Contrast. Ms. UCL.. Author URL

    2006

    • Neeleman, A. (2006). Soft Mutation at the Interface. In H. Broekhuis et al. (eds.)Organising Grammar. Linguistic Studies in Honor of Henk van Riemsdijk , 447-457
    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, H. (2006). On syntactic and phonological representations. Lingua 116(10), 1524-1552 doi:10.1016/j.lingua.2005.08.006.
    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, H. (2006). Syntactic Haplology. In Everaert, M., Van Riemsdijk, H. (Eds.). The Blackwell Companion to Syntax, vol IV ( pp.684-710). Oxford Blackwell Publishers.
    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, H. (2006). Syntactic OCP Effects. In M. Everaert and H. van Riemsdijk (eds.). In The Blackwell Syntactic Companion ( ). London Blackwell.

    2005

    • Neeleman, A., Szendroi, K. (2005). Pro drop and pronouns. Proceedings of WCCFL 24. ( pp.299-307). Sommerville, MA Cascadilla Press.
    • Neeleman, A., van der Koot, H. (2005). Syntactic OCP Effects. in Everaert,M.,van Riemsdijk,H.(ed.). The Blackwell Companion to Syntax
    • Vermeulen, R., In Neeleman, A., Topintzi, E. (2005). External possession in Korean. UCL Working Papers in Linguistics 17, 175-213

    2004

    • Pearce, M., Neeleman, A. (Eds.) (2004). UCL Working Papers in Linguistics 16. UCL Working Papers in Linguistics 16 Author URL
    • Ackema, P., Neeleman, A. D. (2004). Beyond Morphology; Interface Conditions on Word Formation: Studies in Theoretical Linguistics. Oxford. Oxford: Oxford University Press..
    • Neeleman, A., Szendroi, K. (2004). Superman sentences. Linguistic Inquiry 35(1), 149-159 doi:10.1162/ling.2004.35.1.149.
    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, H. (2004). The Grammatical Code. Ms. UCL Author URL
    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, J., Doetjes, J. (2004). Degree expressions. The Linguistic Review 21(1), 1-66 doi:10.1515/tlir.2004.001. Author URL

    2003

    • Neeleman, A., Ackema, P. (2003). Context-Sensitive Spell-Out. Natural Language and Linguistic Theory 21, 681-735
    • van de Koot, H., Mathieu, E. (2003). What's in an Island?

    2002

    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, H. (Eds.) (2002). The Configurational Matrix. Linguistic Inquiry 33(4), 529-574 doi:10.1162/002438902762731763. Author URL
    • Ackema, P., Neeleman, A. (2002). Morphological Selection and Representational Modularity. In Booij, G., van Marle, J. (Eds.). Yearbook of Morphology 2001 ( pp.1-51). Dordrecht Kluwer.
    • In Neeleman, A., and Vermeulen, R., eds, (2002). Ga ga constructions in Japanese. UCL Working Papers in Linguistics 14, 417-456
    • Neeleman, A. (2002). Particle Placement. In Dehi, N., et, A. (Eds.). Verb-Particle Explorations ( pp.141-164). Berlin Mouton de Gruyter.
    • Neeleman, A., Ackema, P. (2002). Effects of Short-Term Storage in Processing Rightward Movement. In Nooteboom, S., et, A. (Eds.). Storage and Computation in the Language Faculty ( pp.219-256). Dordrecht Dordrecht.
    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, H. (2002). Bare Resultatives. The Journal of Comparative Germanic Linguistics 6(1), 1-52 doi:10.1023/A:1022852519378. Author URL
    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, H. (2002). The Configurational Matrix. Linguistic Inquiry. 33(4), 529-574 doi:10.1162/002438902762731763. Author URL

    2001

    • Ackema, P., Neeleman, A. (2001). Competition between Syntax and Morphology. In Grimshaw, J., Legendre, G., Vikner, S. (Eds.). Optimality-Theoretic Syntax ( pp.29-60). Cambridge, MA MIT Press.

    2000

    • Ackema, P., Neeleman, A. (Eds.) (2000). M-Selection and phrasal affixation. UCL Working Papers in Linguistics 12, 307-342
    • Koeneman, O., Neeleman, A. (Eds.) (2000). Predication, verb movement and the distribution of expletives. Lingua
    • Ackema, P., Neeleman, A. (2000). Absolute ungrammaticality. In Dekkers, J., van der Leeuw, F., van de Wijer, J. (Eds.). Optimality Theory; phonology, syntax and acquisition ( pp.279-301). Oxford Oxford University Press.

    1999

    • Neeleman, A., van de Koot, J. (Eds.) (1999). The Configurational Matrix. UCL Working Papers in Linguistics 11

    1998

    • Ackema, P., Neeleman, A. (Eds.) (1998). Conflict Resolution in Passive Formation. Lingua 1, 13-
    • Ackema, P., Neeleman, A. (Eds.) (1998). Optimal Questions. Natural Language and Linguistic Theory 16, 443-490
    • Ackema, P., Neeleman, A. (1998). WHOT? In Barbosa, P., et, A. (Eds.). Is the Best Good Enough ( pp.15-34). Cambridge, Mass. MIT Press.
    • Doetjes, J., Neeleman, A., van de Koot, H. (1998). Degree Expressions and the Autonomy of Syntax. UCL Working Papers in Linguistics 10, 323-368
    • Koeneman, O., Neeleman, A. (1998). . Proceedings of the West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics.

 

Current PhD Students

Hui Cao
Syntax and interfaces of quantification and indefinites, Chinese syntax
Natalie Cichosz
Argument structure and case assignment in dative experiencer contructions
Joy Philip
Linkers, morphosyntactic marking of grammatical dependencies, (dis)harmonic word order, syntactic typology
Misako Tanaka
Syntax-semantics interface; scope freezing and the contrast between covert and overt scope shift

Completed PhD Students

Dirk Bury
Phrase Structure and Derived Heads. (2002)
Vikki Janke
Control without PRO
Axiotis Kechagias
Syntax and Interfaces, especially the Information Component, Discourse Functions, Scrambling-Flexible Syntax, Antisymmertry and Linear Effects
Marika Lekakou
In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated; The Semantics of Middles and its Crosslinguistic Realization. (2004)
Aleksandra Perovic (joint supervision with Neil Smith) Knowledge of Binding in Down Syndrome; Evidence from English and Serbo-Croation. (2003)
Matthew Reeve
The Syntax of Clefts
Kriszta Szendrői (joint supervision with Michael Brody) Focus and the Syntax-Phonology Interface. (2001)
Robert Truswell
The syntax of adjunction
Reiko Vermeulen The Syntax of External Possession: Its Basis in Theta-Theory. (2005)

 

I teach undergraduate as well as postgraduate courses in linguistics. These deal mainly with issues in theoretical syntax. I also supervise PhD students working on problems in this area or in the relation between syntax and syntax-external systems.

  • Linguistic Theory
  • Syntactic theory (generative grammar)
  • Computational and representational properties of h

Ad Neeleman - CV

Name: Adriaan Dirk Neeleman
Affiliation: Research Department of Linguistics
UCL Division of Psychology and Language Sciences
Chandler House
2 Wakefield Street,
London WC1N 1PF
Present appointment: Professor of Linguistics
Telephone: +44 (0) 207 679 4045
E-mail: a.neeleman@ucl.ac.uk
November 1989: MA in Dutch Linguistics and Literature, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
January 1994: PhD (cum laude), Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
December 1989 –November 1993: Research assistant, Research Institute for Language and Speech (OTS), Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
December 1993 – November 1996: Post-doctoral fellow, OTS, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
September 1997 – October 2001: Lecturer, Department of Phonetics and Linguistics, University College London.
October 2001 – September 2005: Reader, Department of Phonetics and Linguistics, University College London.
October 2005 – present: Professor, Department of Phonetics and Linguistics, University College London.
June 1995: Course in syntax, LOT Summer School, University of Amsterdam.
November 1995: Course in syntax, Dept. of Linguistics, ELTE University, Budapest (with Fred Weerman).
October – December 2000: Course in syntax at the Department of Linguistics, Oxford University.
August 2002: Courses in syntax and in morphology at the EGG Summer School, University of Novi Sad.
January 2003: Course in syntax, LOT Winter School, Free University, Amsterdam (with Fred Weerman).
July - August 2005: Two courses in syntax at the EGG Summer School, University of Wrocław.
April 2006 Course on PF at the Boğaziçi University, Istanbul.
Since September 2004: Visiting examiner for the BA programme in Linguistics at the University of Essex.
PhD examinations:

Petra de Wit, Utrecht University, 1996.

Andrew Caink, Durham University, 1998.

Joost Dekkers, University of Amsterdam, 1999.

Olaf Koeneman, Utrecht University, 2000.

Hajime Hattori, University of Essex, 2003.

Laura Dominguez, Boston University, 2003.

Corrien Blom, Free University, Amsterdam, 2004.

Reviewer for grant-giving organizations (AHRB, Dutch Science Foundation, ESRC, Leverhulme Trust, Research Council of Norway); international conferences (GLOW, Going Romance, LAGB meetings, NELS, WECOL, WCCFL); international journals (Journal of Comparative Germanic Linguistics, Language, Lingua, Linguistic Inquiry, The Linguistic Review, Linguistics, Natural Language & Linguistic Theory, Probus, Yearbook of Morphology) and publishers (Kluwer, CUP, OUP).


Member of editorial boards of Journal of Comparative Germanic Linguistics, Kluwer, Dordrecht; Morphology Online (http://MorphOn.w.interia.pl) and SKASE Journal of Theoretical Linguistics (http://www.skase.sk/).
September 1992 – September 1996: Contributor to the GLOW newsletter (‘Unpublished material received’).
September 1998 – September 2005: Editor of the UCL Working Papers in Linguistics.
Guest editor, with Peter Ackema, of the special issue of the Journal of Comparative Germanic Linguistics on Lexical Integrity (2002).  
December 1989 – November 1993: Grant from Utrecht University, The Netherlands, for a research assistantship at the Research Institute for Language and Speech (OTS).
November 1994: Study Prize for an outstanding PhD dissertation in the humanities, awarded by the foundation Praemium Erasmianum.
December 1993 – November 1996: Grant from Utrecht University, The Netherlands, for a post-doctoral fellowship at the Research Institute for Language and Speech (OTS).
1 January – 1 June 2002 Research Leave Grant from the AHRC.
1 May 2006 - 30 April 2009 Research Grant from the AHRC (for two post-docs).

Travel grants from various organisations.
Former PhD students: Dirk Bury: Phrase Structure and Derived Heads.; Marika Lekakou: In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated; The Semantics of Middles and its Crosslinguistic Realization.; Alex Perovic: Knowledge of Binding in Down Syndrome; Evidence from English and Serbo-Croatian; Kriszta Szendrői: Focus and the Syntax-Phonology Interface. Reiko Vermeulen: The Syntax of External Possession.
Current PhD students: Vikki Janke on The syntax of control; Takumoto Suda on Secondary predication in Japanese; Robert Truswell on The syntax of adjunction (AHRC-funded); Matthew Reeve on Morphological case (AHRC-funded).
Since September 2001: Chair of the Board of Examiners for MAs in Linguistics, Phonology, Pragmatics, and Syntax.
Since September 2001: Honorary Secretary of the Linguistics Association of Great Britain (LAGB; http://www.lagb.org ).
Since September 2002: Member of the Steering Group for Centre for Human Communication, UCL (CHC; http://www.chc.ucl.ac.uk/)
Since September 2004: Member of the Steering Group for Advanced Core Training in Linguistics (ACTL; http://www.actl.ucl.ac.uk/ ).
Conferences:

Co-organiser of the OTS/HIL Workshop on Particle Constructions, Utrecht (June 1992).

Co-organiser of the OTS/HIL Workshop on Optionality in Syntax, Utrecht (September 1993)

Co-organiser of the OTS Workshop on Burzio’s Generalization, Utrecht (June 1994).

Co-organiser of the LAGB Workshop on Optimality-Theoretic Syntax, Durham (September 2000).

Organizer of the CHC Workshop ‘Confronting Linguistic Theory with Atypical Language’ (December 2003).


‘Lexical Integrity and the Dual Nature of Particles’, First Conference on Diachronic Generative Syntax, University of York, April 1990 (presentation of joint work with Fred Weerman).
‘Scrambling as a D-structure Phenomenon’, Tilburg University Workshop on Scrambling, University of Tilburg, October 1990.
‘Case Theory and the Diachrony of Complex Predicates in Dutch’, Going Romance and Beyond, University of Utrecht, June 1991 (presentation of joint work with Fred Weerman).
‘Case Theory and the Diachrony of Complex Predicates in Dutch’, International Conference on Historical Linguistics, University of Amsterdam, August 1991 (presentation of joint work with Fred Weerman).
‘Verbal Prefixation in Dutch: Thematic Evidence for Conversion’, Morphology Days, University of Ghent, September 1991 (presentation of joint work with Joleen Schipper).
‘Against Small Clause Complements’ 7th Workshop on Comparative Germanic Syntax, University of Stuttgart, November 1991.
‘Lexical Integrity and the Dual Nature of Particles’, Alternate lecture, Nels 23, Ottawa, October 1992 (presentation of joint work with Fred Weerman).
‘Transparent Adjuncts and Reflexivity’, Alternate lecture, GLOW, University of Vienna, April 1994 (presentation of joint work with Claudia Borgonovo).
‘Case Checking and the OV/VO Parameter’, Langues et Grammaire I, University of Paris 7, June 1994.
‘PP-Complements and LF Theta-Role Discharge’, Alternate lecture, WCCFL, University of California, Santa Cruz, March 1995.
‘Optimal Questions’, MIT Workshop on Optimality in Syntax, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, May 1995 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘Parameters in L1 and L2 Acquisition’, LARS 1995, Utrecht University, May 1995 (presentation of joint work with Fred Weerman).
‘NP Raising Decomposed’, GLOW, University of Tromsø, June 1995.
‘Parameters in L1 and L2 Acquisition’, Boston University Conference on Language Development, Boston University, November 1995 (presentation of joint work with Fred Weerman).
‘Optimal Questions’, 11th Workshop on Comparative Germanic Syntax, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, November 1995 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘Asymmetric Parsing of Symmetric Syntax’, WECOL, University of California, Santa Cruz, October 1996 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘Transitive Expletive Constructions in Flexible Syntax’, WCCFL, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, February 1998 (presentation of joint work with Olaf Koeneman).
‘Competition between Syntax and Morphology’, Conference on Storage and Computation, Utrecht University, October 1998 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘The Configurational Matrix’, LAGB, University of Manchester, April 1999 (presentation of joint work with Hans van de Koot).
‘The Configurational Matrix’, Alternate lecture, GLOW, FAS, Berlin, April 1999 (presentation of joint work with Hans van de Koot).
‘On the Different Selectional Properties of Null and Overt Affixes’, GLOW Workshop on Null/Overt Morphology, University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, April 2000 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘The Configurational Matrix’, TILT 01, Utrecht University, July 2001 (presentation of joint work with Hans van de Koot).
Bare Resultatives, LAGB Autumn Meeting, University of Reading, September 2001 (presentation of joint work with Hans van de Koot).
‘Morphological Selection’, 3rd Mediterranean Morphology Meeting, Barcelona, September 2001 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘Microvariation as a Consequence of Context-Sensitive Spell-Out, GLOW, Meertens Institute, Amsterdam, April 2002 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘Agreement Checking at PF’, 18th Workshop on Comparative Germanic Syntax, University of Durham, September 2003 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘The Grammatical Code’, TILT 03, University of Budapest, May 2004 (presentation of joint work with Hans van de Koot).
‘Radical Pro Drop and the Pronominal Paradigm’, WCCFL 24, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, March 2005 (presentation of joint work with Kriszta Szendrői).
‘Universal 20 without the LCA’, GLOW, University of Barcelona, April 2006 (presentation of joint work with Klaus Abels).
‘The Nature of Discourse Templates’, GLOW, University of Barcelona, April 2006 (presentation of joint work with Hans van de Koot).
‘Deriving Functional Projections’, University of Amsterdam, February 1992 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema and Fred Weerman).
‘Complex Predicates’, University College London, March 1992.
‘Scrambling as a D-structure Phenomenon’, University College London, March 1992.
‘Deriving Functional Projections’, University of Groningen, June 1992 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema and Fred Weerman).
‘The Morphological Status of Verb-Particle Constructions’, OTS/HIL Workshop on Particle Constructions, Utrecht University, June 1992.
‘Complex Predicates and the OV/VO Parameter’, New Jersey Syntax Circle, Princeton University, September 1992.
‘Scrambling as a D-structure Phenomenon’, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, October 1992.
‘Complex Predicates’, Stanford University, December 1992.
‘Complex Predicates and the OV/VO Parameter’, UCLA, Los Angeles, December 1992.
‘A Null Operator Analysis of Predicate Formation’, OTS/HIL Workshop on Burzio’s Generalization, Utrecht University, June 1994.
‘Derived Predicates’, DGfS Workshop on Argument Structure, University of Göttingen, March 1995.
‘PP-Complements and LF Theta-Role Discharge’, Université Laval, Québec, March 1995.
‘Case Checking and the OV/VO Parameter’, DGfS Workshop on Interface Grammars, University of Düsseldorf, October 1995.
‘PP-Complements and LF Theta-Role Discharge’, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, November 1995.
‘WH-Movement and Passivization in Optimality Theory’, 1995 Nijmegen Lectures, Max Planck Institute, Nijmegen, December 1995 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘PP-Complements and LF Theta-Role Discharge’, University of Tübingen, February 1996.
‘Asymmetric Parsing of Symmetric Syntax’, University of Cologne, June 1996 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema)
‘Transitive Expletive Constructions in Flexible Syntax’, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, December 1997 (presentation of joint work with Olaf Koeneman).
‘Transitive Expletive Constructions in Flexible Syntax’, SOAS, London, December 1997 (presentation of joint work with Olaf Koeneman).
‘Competition between Syntax and Morphology’, University of Durham, February 1998 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘Degree Expression and the Autonomy of Syntax’, Birkbeck College, London, February 1998 (presentation of joint work with Jenny Doetjes and Hans van de Koot).
‘Optimal Questions’, Teach-in on Optimality in Syntax, University of Manchester, September 1998 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘Competition between Syntax and Morphology’, University of Cologne, May 1999 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘Competition between Syntax and Morphology’, Oxford University, December 1999 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘Competition between Syntax and Morphology’, Workshop on Particle Verbs, University of Leipzig, February 2000 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘On the Selectional Properties of Affixes’, University of Groningen, March 2000 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘The Configurational Matrix’, Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, Fez, April 2000 (presentation of joint work with Hans van de Koot).
‘M-Selection and Phrasal Affixation’, University of Essex, Colchester, November 2000 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘The Configurational Matrix’, Kings College, London, November 2000 (presentation of joint work with Hans van de Koot).
‘The Configurational Matrix’, IV International LEHIA Workshop, University of the Basque Country, Vitoria, June 2001 (presentation of joint work with Hans van de Koot).
‘Context-Sensitive Spell-Out and Adjacency’, IV International LEHIA Workshop, University of the Basque Country, Vitoria, June 2001 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘Distributed Selection and Phrasal Affixation’ Linguistics and Phonetics 2002, Meikai University, Tokyo, September 2002 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘Generalized Insertion’ Linguistics and Phonetics 2002, Meikai University, Tokyo, September 2002 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘Complementizer Agreement as PF Feature Manipulation’, Ling-Lunch, MIT, April 2003 (Presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘Phi: Conditions on PF Feature Manipulation’ Linguistic Society, University of Cambridge, November 2003 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘The Competence-Performance Distinction’, Research Seminar, University of Reading, February 2004 (presentation of joint work with Hans van de Koot).
‘Pro-drop and the Pronominal Paradigm’, York-Essex Morphology Meeting, University of Essex, November 2004 (presentation of joint work with Kriszta Szendrői).
‘Floating Quantifiers and English VP-Structure’, Research Seminar, University of Tromsø, November 2005 (presentation of joint work with Vikki Janke).
‘Floating Quantifiers and English VP Structure’, Research Seminar, University of Manchester, (presentation of joint work with Vikki Janke).
‘Pro-drop and the Pronominal Paradigm’, Research Seminar, University of Oxford, January 2006 (presentation of joint work with Kriszta Szendrői).
‘Universal 20 without the LCA’, Research Seminar, University of Edinburgh, February 2006 (presentation of joint work with Klaus Abels).
‘Restricted Pro-Drop in Early Modern Dutch’, York-Essex Morphology Meeting, University of York, February 2006 (presentation of joint work with Peter Ackema).
‘The Flexible Nature of the English VP’, 1st International IDEA Conference: “Studies in English”, Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, April 2006.