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string(61) "https://www.ucl.ac.uk/drupal/site_ioe/api/degree-modules/list"
array(533) { ["Action Learning for Teaching in a Specialist Area of Disability"]=> string(359) "

This is a specialist teacher education module for those working with disabled adults in the post-compulsory sector. This module aims to enable learners to understand and investigate a specific impairment and its impact on teaching and learning. Learners will investigate practice in an area of disability and apply this learning to their own practice.

" ["Advanced Quantitative Methods"]=> string(615) "

This module builds on Term 1�s Data Analysis and Introduction to Regression Analysis, covering standard regression and simple non-linear models in a more detailed manner. We will quickly move on to discuss issues with simple methods such as omitted variable bias and classical and non-classical measurement error. We will then cover advanced topics and how these deal with some of the issues faced, including panel data, hierarchical (multi-level) models, probit, ordinal, multinomial and selection models and quantile regressions. This module will use the statistical analysis program STATA throughout.

" ["Advanced Qualitative Methods"]=> string(1001) "

This module aims to enable a deeper understanding of qualitative approaches and qualitative methods in the social sciences introduced in Term 1. Students will review a selection of approaches to qualitative research design, data collection/generation and analysis with the aim of enabling an appreciation of the challenges of triangulation within qualitative methods and between qualitative and quantitative methods.

Learning in this module will provide students with skills needed to undertake advanced qualitative analysis and by the end of the module students should be able to analyse critically the use of different qualitative methodologies in social research and feel comfortable with carrying out this type of research on their own.

Advanced themes will vary year to year but indicative areas include: Narrative Research; Ethnography, Visual and other sensory methods; Discourse and Conversational analysis; Social media research. Each year the module will cover two themes.

" ["Advancing Teaching and Learning in Higher and Professional Education"]=> string(956) "

As the final module of the Professional Certificate Programme, this module draws on the participants' experience of both teaching in higher and professional education and on their experience of the programme to date. Responsibility will be shared between tutors and participants. Participants will be encouraged to link theory and practice and reflect on their experience with a view to understanding their own needs and how these might be met within the context of the programme.

The module comprises two components:
  • Core component: split one day and two day workshop focused on wider issues in university and professional teaching and the use of portfolios as a vehicle for reflection on teaching and learning. There is an option to take this workshop via Open Mode.
  • One two-day workshop on an aspect of practical teaching to be selected by participants as relevant to their professional development.
" ["A-level Mathematics Pedagogy"]=> string(928) "Please note that this module is only available to those who have applied and been accepted on the Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching Advanced Mathematics.

The curriculum for this module is organised around two strands:

  • mathematical content topics from core A-level modules
  • key pedagogic strategies: group work, technology-enhanced learning, questioning, assessment, sustained mathematical enquiry, explaining and reasoning.

These two strands are interlinked so that participants can gain practical, evaluative and research-informed knowledge of how pedagogic choices relate to learners' developing understanding of more advanced and abstract mathematical ideas. Participants will read and discuss research, will act as students in model lessons exemplifying these strategies, and will develop ideas of how to incorporate them into their own teaching.

" ["Ageing and Society"]=> string(945) "

Populations globally are ageing rapidly. Lower birth rates and higher levels of life expectancy are transforming population structures, and the proportion of older people has surpassed that of younger people in many countries. Advances in life expectancy are a testament to human achievement, and growing numbers of older people are a cause for celebration. However, continued squeezing of dependency ratios, with fewer people of working age available to support younger and older people, presents a challenge to decision-makers in (re)developing social policies that transform traditional notions of ageing and older age across a range of policy areas.

This module will critically explore the challenges of population ageing from a number of standpoints, and will encourage students to consider the extent to which policy-makers are also responding to the opportunities that increasing numbers of older people in society can bring.

" ["Alternative Models for Art Education"]=> string(1007) "

In the past decade political, economic and technological developments have had a major impact on art education and generated critical debate about the efficacy of existing art educational models. As a direct response new paradigms are being established locally and globally, including: online colleges, nomadic art schools, and more idiosyncratic short-term projects in and outside of established institutions.

This module enables students to investigate and engage critically with these recent initiatives. Geographical context will also be examined in relation to the increasingly global and digitally networked possibilities for education, communication and knowledge production. The module requires students to devise a proposal for an educational model linked to a specific context that is relevant to their practice. As such it will allow them to formulate their developing philosophical and critical position as artist educators whilst engaging with current literature and debate.

" ["An Independent Study in Higher and Professional Education"]=> string(486) "The purpose of this module is to allow participants to devise their own programme of work to meet a particular professional or personal need not otherwise met in the modules available to them. Programmes of work are developed from participants' own interests, but could involve one of the following: observation of course reviews across an institution, an analysis of an educational innovation, a detailed library-based piece of research, perhaps in a specialised library.

" ["An Independent Study in Higher Education Management"]=> string(548) "

Please note that this module is only available to students on the MBA in Higher Education Management.

The purpose of this module is to allow participants to devise their own programme of work to meet a particular professional need not otherwise met in the modules available to them. The quantity of work involved will be similar to that in the other optional modules in the MBA programme, and will require regular reports to the module tutor on agreed aspects of the chosen topic, prior to the completion of a 3000 word assignment.

" ["An introduction to applied quantitative analysis in the social sciences"]=> string(526) "

This hands-on, application-driven introduction to quantitative research, aims to give you the tools to scrutinise, conduct and present basic statistical analyses in the social sciences and education studies. The module will introduce statistical concepts, issues surrounding the quantitative measurement of social science concepts, and research applications through relatable, real-life case studies. Sessions will be supported by a computer-based seminar series using SPSS to further your quantitative analysis skills.

" ["Archival Research and Oral History in Education"]=> string(958) "

This module is an introduction to historical research in education, focusing mainly on archival research and oral history. It aims to introduce students to the processes and conventions of research and writing in the history of education, to key genres of documents and other source material, to the ethics of historical research in education, and to the wide range of archival resources at the UCL Institute of Education and elsewhere.

Students will examine the ways in which historians of education have used different kinds of material, and will produce their own research study using primary and secondary sources. The module considers how research questions are devised, refined and answered, and some of the sub-disciplinary particularities of history of education. A key feature of the module is that students will gain hands-on experience of working with documents, oral history recordings and other sources such as photographs and film.

" ["Artificial Intelligence and Data Analytics in Education"]=> string(1010) "

The advent of Artificial Intelligence (AI), which is often mistakenly equated with 'robots', and the growing prevalence of smart technologies increasingly necessitate the need for non-AI specialists to understand the key issues, debates and innovations in the field of AI, and to develop both theoretical understanding and practical skills that will enable them to actively contribute to both the AI innovations and to policies and practices that relate to them. The application of AI in Education is of critical importance to the way that both fields evolve as well as to influencing the direction the present debates in an informed way.

This module is appropriate for teachers, educators, and current or potential start-up employees or aspiring entrepreneurs with an introduction to debates, topics, concepts and techniques related to Artificial Intelligence in Education and Data Analytics along with an opportunity for practical application of those concepts to specific educational problems.

" ["Assessing Colleagues' Learning"]=> string(930) "

Assessing Colleagues' Learning has been specifically developed alongside 'Developing the role of the Higher or Further Education Tutor' as continuing professional development for tutors working in Higher Education (HE) and Further Education (FE) establishments. Participants will explore formal assessment procedures and reflect on quality assurance and quality enhancement for effective provision. They will analyse criteria for summative assessment as well as investigate alternative modes of assessment, such as portfolios or computer based methods. The needs of different subject fields will be considered. Both formative and summative assessment processes are studied with particular attention to their role in the learning process.

Participants are expected to submit coursework evidencing their reading in the field and their reflections upon their experience of formative and summative assessment procedures.

" ["Assessing Colleagues' Learning (H-level)"]=> string(1135) "Assessing Colleagues' Learning has been specifically developed alongside DDOPRO_61 (Developing the role of the Higher or Further Education Tutor) as continuing professional development for tutors working in HE and FE establishments. Participants will explore formal assessment procedures and reflect on quality assurance and quality enhancement for effective provision. They will analyse criteria for summative assessment as well as investigate alternative modes of assessment, such as portfolios or computer based methods. The needs of different subject fields will be considered. Both formative and summative assessment processes are studied with particular attention to their role in the learning process. The module may be delivered by traditional methods, by blended mode, or fully by distance online, depending on specific needs of participants. Practical work including discussion of sample submissions for grading is included. Participants are expected to submit coursework evidencing their reading in the field and their reflections upon their experience of formative and summative assessment procedures.

" ["Assessing Colleagues' Learning (M-level)"]=> string(1135) "Assessing Colleagues' Learning has been specifically developed alongside MMAAEP_03 (Developing the role of the Higher or Further Education Tutor) as continuing professional development for tutors working in HE and FE establishments. Participants will explore formal assessment procedures and reflect on quality assurance and quality enhancement for effective provision. They will analyse criteria for summative assessment as well as investigate alternative modes of assessment, such as portfolios or computer based methods. The needs of different subject fields will be considered. Both formative and summative assessment processes are studied with particular attention to their role in the learning process. The module may be delivered by traditional methods, by blended mode, or fully by distance online, depending on specific needs of participants. Practical work including discussion of sample submissions for grading is included. Participants are expected to submit coursework evidencing their reading in the field and their reflections upon their experience of formative and summative assessment procedures.

" ["Assessment for Learning"]=> string(643) "

The emphasis in this module is on engaging critically with assessment and learning issues, to facilitate new ways to thinking about them, based on a rich variety of literature. This is not a training course for teachers who want to practise assessment for learning, although practitioners will be making presentations within the module.

Assuming that learning is a social activity with social purposes, in this module participants will be encouraged to learn from each other about assessment, learning and assessment for learning.

You will be asked to write collaboratively and assess each other's writing during the module.

" ["Assessment of SpLD (dyslexia)"]=> string(1377) "

Prerequisite: you must have undertaken studies in theory underpinning reading and spelling acquisition and development either Understanding SpLD module or equivalent and Evidence Based Practice Module. You will:

  • need time with three pupils with literacy difficulties to assess their needs through a combination of standardised and informal assessments
  • be required to film two assessments which will be observed with formative feedback given from an AMBDA qualified tutor.
By the end of the module you should be able to:
  • apply understanding and knowledge of research based theoretical perspectives in a critical and analytic fashion to assessment and teaching decisions
  • be able to administer and analyse both norm-referenced and informal assessments of learners of different ages with reading, writing and spelling difficulties
  • use current theories to inform their selection of materials for comprehensive assessment of the individual needs of learners with SpLD (dyslexia) of different ages
  • develop self-reflection and professional expertise in administering and interpreting norm-referenced and informal assessment procedures with children and young adults up to the age of 16 with SpLD (dyslexia)
  • be equipped to write competent professional reports containing diagnostic assessment and recommendations for intervention.

" ["Assessment: Issues and Practice"]=> string(589) "

This module aims to deepen participants' understanding of the different purposes of assessment and the underlying theoretical concepts in the field. It addresses both summative ('assessment of learning') and formative ('assessment for learning') uses.

Some of the key features of summative assessment that will be explored include: validity, reliability, bias and fairness. Formative issues include validity, learning intentions, feedback and peer/self-assessment. Issues explored include accountability, assessment policy, international assessment and vocational assessment.

" ["Atypical Development"]=> string(393) "This module provides an analysis of the nature, origins, developmental course and treatment of atypical development throughout childhood and adolescence. Topics that will be discussed are internalising and externalising problems (ADHD, depression), autism, eating disorders reading difficulties, number difficulties, specific language disorders, self harm and forensic psychology.

" ["Autism: Research and Practice"]=> string(1385) "

This Masters-level module will enable you to critically assess core findings in cutting-edge scientific autism research. It will also enable you to relate those findings to contemporary educational and clinical practice and to reflect on the ethical issues posed by recent autism science and practice.

You will be taught by international leaders in the field from the world-leading Centre for Research in Autism and Education (CRAE) at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

Issues discussed in the module include: scientific definitions of autism; debunking popular myths about autism; analysing the ways in which autism changes over the life course; social challenges faced by autistic people; evaluating educational approaches for children, young people and adults on the autism spectrum; and ways in which autism is framed in contemporary politics and society.

The module is delivered in face-to-face seminars, online discussion groups and practical settings. The module is for anyone who wants to learn about the most up-to-date autism research, to overcome stereotypes about autism, and apply scientific knowledge to everyday practice and thinking about autism. You will also enjoy close connections with CRAE and its far-reaching network of clinicians, educators, and members of the autism community.

" ["Autistic Spectrum Disorders"]=> string(4) " " ["Bilingualism and Multilingualism"]=> string(929) "The Multilingual Classroom takes an in-depth look at diverse classrooms of both children and young people in urban settings, by examining key studies of research and practice in this field. Although the focus is on London, the view taken is that it is necessary to look more widely, nationally and internationally, at how classrooms deal with diversity in the twenty first century, particularly when learners are receiving an education through a language other than their mother tongue. We contextualize the situations we examine within wider social structures in order to examine the impact on educational opportunity for minority ethnic and bilingual learners. However the major emphasis is on how bilingual learners are offered space in classrooms to maximize current resources and develop new skills and knowledge. Tools for conducting small-scale classroom research will be provided in the programme of the module. " ["Bodies and Digital Media"]=> string(1090) "

The module offers a wide-ranging exploration of the cultural manifestations of the body and its relationship to digital media, including a study of how this relationship shapes and reshapes cultural identities and produces different modes of being. The term 'digital media' describes interrelationships between different forms of media, digital technologies and computational-based practices. In this module is used in direct reference to digital art and other cultural practices, thus the module provides key socio-cultural methods for the study of this relationship in the contemporary world, including methods for the study of visual culture and embodied forms of interaction. The module recognises both disciplinary and interdisciplinary dimensions of the topic.

All of the sessions involve questions around the relationship between identity, culture, the body and digital media. The range of sessions offered allow for a comparative understanding of different perspectives of the body and digital media, encouraging more holistic responses to the experience of the topic.

" ["Brain and Behaviour"]=> string(601) "

Our thoughts, feelings, perceptions and actions are all products of the workings of the human brain. But our brain and its related nervous system is housed in our body, and like the rest of the body is also influenced by the activities of chemical messengers called hormones.

This module on Brain and Behaviour takes a biopsychological approach to understanding how the nervous and hormonal systems interact to produce human thought and behaviour. Through a series of varied topics, we will consider how such systems allow us to monitor, understand and interact with the world around us.

" ["Childhood Studies - An Exploration of Childhoods"]=> string(875) "

This module seeks to support students to develop an inter-disciplinary understanding of the concept of childhood and how it shapes interactions within the spaces of family, peer relations, education institutions, government policy and the law. Students will examine sociological, philosophical, historical and psychological perspectives on understanding childhoods in different geographical and institutional contexts.

Starting with a review of the study of childhoods, and the socially constructed nature of such an idea, the module then engages with the concept of children's rights within policy, the legal system and more intimate, family contexts. Subsequently, through a focus on early childhood, friendships, popular culture, gender and sexuality, and health, the locatedness, contradictory nature, and potential for agency within childhoods are examined.

" ["Children with Disabilities: Theory, Politics and Experience"]=> string(787) "

In this module students will be introduced to theoretical and political questions about students with learning difficulties and disabilities, including students with severe and profound learning difficulties. After looking at competing models of disability, we will examine questions about health, human dignity, respect, rights, equality, dependency, creativity and inclusion; and we explore how people with disabilities value their lives and how to assess their testimony about living with a disability. The module will include philosophical and sociological theory, the politics of disability, numerous examples of first person testimony, and a session given over to the work of Oily Cart, a company who include children with profound disabilities in their interactive theatre.

" ["Children's Rights in Practice"]=> string(1084) "

This module explores sociological, socio-legal and political theories of the relationship between children’s rights, unequal childhoods and children’s citizenship. You will investigate the dynamic and contested nature of rights and the norms, values and logics that shape them.

The module will provide the foundation for critically reflecting on the ways rights are interpreted and applied by people concerned with the care, education, health, and welfare of children, as well as how rights are shaped by children’s interests, concerns and practices.

You will be encouraged to analyse and evaluate the effects of rights-based approaches and children’s rights regimes on efforts to achieve social justice for children in global and historical perspectives.

You will hear from a range of speakers engaged in research, policy, professional practice and activism related to a wide variety of areas of children’s rights and have the chance to explore your own areas of interest under the guidance of module tutors. The module also includes a field visit.

" ["Choral Conducting, Leadership and Communication"]=> string(1179) "This module is intended for participants who engage in conducting and directing choral activity in schools or in the community. It aims is to identify areas for development in participants' professional practice and theoretical understanding in choral conducting and explore ways forward for effective conducting, leadership and communication. The module provides a critical introduction to and development of choral conducting skills, concentrating specifically on the dynamic relationship between research and practice in the field. As singing has recently gained acknowledgement as a significant musical and educational activity by the Secretary of State, it is timely and opportune that this module addresses the issues of teachers' skills and knowledge in the choral conducting area in order to enhance and develop quality singing and vocal development in school and other contexts. The module offers students the opportunity to engage in practical conducing workshops, reflection on professional practice and critical review of research and theory. It is delivered in a mixed mode with face to face seminars on four separate days as well as study through a VLE.

" ["Clinical and Educational Supervision"]=> string(1147) "This innovative distance learning module in Clinical and Educational Supervision is designed and delivered in conjunction with UCL Medical School. Drawing on a range of theoretical approaches, this module critically assesses existing approaches to supervision reflecting on the implications of their use in individual clinical environments. It provides students with the opportunity to explore these theories and existing practices and to deepen their understanding of the role that supervision can play in clinical education and training. Key questions for this module are: What are the main theories of supervision and how can these be applied to your practice as an educator? How might you improve the quality of a supervisory relationship? How can you enhance learning through the use of workplace based assessments, supervision and feedback? What is needed to facilitate learners to identify and address learning needs, improve reflective practice and safely develop clinical expertise? The module can be taken as a short course. It can also be taken as a component of a number of MA programmes at the Institute of Education.

" ["Coaching and Mentoring Principles, Theory and Application to Practice"]=> string(884) "This module offers participants an opportunity to explore the key principles and theories around coaching and mentoring and provides a safe environment in which to test out and apply these principles, to practice the core skills for effective coach/mentoring and to learn a range of coaching and mentoring models and techniques. Participants also reflect on and evaluate their own learning and application and identify how this can be further improved. Connection is made between coaching /mentoring and leadership, consideration given to how practise may be influenced and dilemmas created by a range of issues/ contexts. Ethical practice and the application of coaching supervision are examined and related to ongoing professional development. Although contextually and culturally grounded, the main focus of this module is on the developing the individuals' practice.

" ["Cognitive Development and Learning"]=> string(773) "This module aims to develop knowledge and understanding of psychological theory and research on learning and development. It covers three broad approaches to the study of cognitive development and learning in contemporary psychology; Piagetian, information-processing and socio-cultural. Applications of these approaches within education are considered through research on children's and adults' learning and cognitive growth in diverse fields of knowledge. Topics will include: processes of cognitive growth, relationships between schooling and cognitive development, individual tutoring, social interaction and learning, children's strategies for understanding and remembering, development of early mathematical concepts, and development of understanding of science. " ["Cognitive Behavioural Therapy: applications and practice"]=> string(797) "

This module aims to support students to develop a critical understanding of research into psychopathology and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and to facilitate understanding of how CBT is used and evaluated. Students will be encouraged to develop their skills as scientist-practitioners, being able to show an awareness of the evidence base for CBT alongside basic practical skills in its delivery.

The module aims to help students to utilise experiential learning to develop their own practical skills and an ability to reflect on their developing competencies which is a key skill required by trainee psychologists and psychotherapists. The aim is to provide constructive alignment between learning in the classroom and real life competencies demonstrated by CBT practitioners.

" ["Cognitive Psychology"]=> string(417) "

Having learnt (almost) everything there is to know about the structure and function of the human brain in the Brain and Behaviour module, students have the tools to start learning about how the brain generates cognition.

In this module students will learn about how we understand what we see, how we produce and understand language, how we make decisions and plans, and what happens when things go wrong.

" ["Communicating Geography in Education"]=> string(372) "This module takes the view that Geography is a resource with educational potential. We look at current (and past) debates in Geography and ask what value this has for the school student. In this module, you will have engaged with current debates in academic Geography and will have considered what importance this has for the Geography taught in the classroom.

" ["Comparative Education: Theories and Methods"]=> string(718) "

This module introduces participants to the theory and practice of comparative education. It will review the historical development of the field and its relations with policy-making and other areas of comparative study; explore key concepts and theoretical frameworks used by comparativists; and develop understanding of the main methodological approaches to systematic comparative research. The use of comparative evidence by policy-makers and the process of policy-borrowing will be critically examined and the module will explore, through a range of case studies, how comparative analysis has contributed to the understanding of educational process and the relations between education and its social contexts.

" ["Concepts and Contexts of Special and Inclusive Education"]=> string(699) "

This module reflects on the implications of recent, current and relevant legislation in the UK and elsewhere on policy and practice in schools, colleges and other education-related settings. It includes critical analysis of the terminology of 'special educational needs', 'inclusion', 'exclusion' and 'labelling' and sets UK special education policy and provision into a wider international context. The focus is to relate participants' own professional experience to a range of diverse theoretical models and use knowledge, understanding, awareness and insights gained to generate own hypotheses and propose own 'solutions' to issues relevant to the field of special and inclusive education.

" ["Constructing and Interpreting Heritage Culture"]=> string(1106) "

This module explores the learning and teaching opportunities that take place in spaces typically defined as places of leisure rather than learning. As the boundaries between formal and informal learning blur alternative sites for learning such as heritage sites (including gardens, zoos and the eco-museum via geo-tourism) have extended their educational remit beyond the pamphlet or guide-book.

This module explores and critically appraises the educational potential of these sites and participants will be required to:

  • critique received views of heritage, culture and history within a multicultural increasingly global context and to offer an alternative perspective on museum and gallery learning
  • develop a critical understanding of the contribution the heritage industry can make to building new cultures and communities
  • establish the need for criticality in relation to learning and teaching in informal educational sites
  • understand the structures and ideologies that sustain heritage culture within the global context of the 'new tourism'.

" ["Contemporary Art and Artists in Education"]=> string(562) "

The module will enable you to engage critically with contemporary art (practices and discourses) and to investigate the potential of contemporary art and artists to inform practice in different educational contexts, e.g. schools, colleges, galleries and museums. It aims to challenge educational orthodoxies and question myths surrounding modernism by considering contemporary art in the context of the wider international field of visual and material culture. In order to explore debates and practices you will be introduced to analytical methodologies.

" ["Global Debates and Research into Practice: Educating Children Aged 4-12"]=> string(1542) "

This module aims to challenge and enhance participants' knowledge and understanding of international debates and research central to education involving children aged 4-12. The module features input from key researchers innovating developments in practice and theory, and reviews current research that is crucial to understanding and working in the sector. The curriculum and its management as well as the impact of context on children's progress will be considered. 

Participants will develop an understanding of the factors that influence current debates and trends in education with young children and will be encouraged to reflect upon the implications for their further professional practice. 

Sessions will examine research from different countries and contexts into new thinking and initiatives related, for example, to: professional identity,  inclusion, equity and achievement, assessment and standards, children's mental health and wellbeing and cross-cultural perspectives on pedagogy. Implications for teaching and learning in the primary sector will be considered. 

The module is highly participatory, with structured activities and developmental tasks designed to accompany input from lecturers. Participants will be encouraged to develop their own interests in particular aspects of enquiry into educating children aged 4-12, to reflect upon and share their experiences of practice and to develop an awareness of recent research and developments within schools and communities.

" ["Contemporary Issues in Clinical Education"]=> string(0) "" ["Contemporary Issues in English Education"]=> string(601) "

This module takes a theoretical and critical approach to five issues in contemporary English education, including:

  • issues of gender, identity and diversity; the literary canon and the teaching of literature
  • multimodality and new literacies
  • the teaching of writing (including the teaching or not of grammar)
  • culture outside the classroom (culture, texts, social practices) and how it relates to English learning and teaching in the classroom.

This module is appropriate for those with experience of working as an English/Language Arts/Literacy teacher.

" ["Contemporary Issues in the Early Years"]=> string(933) "

This module introduces a range of important contemporary issues related to the provision of services for young children and their families. The content of the module will be embedded within current policy contexts, professional practice, recent research, and contemporary debates about the changing landscape of the early years sector, the practitioner's role in working with children, families and other professionals within early years settings, schools and children's services. The module aims to raise questions about the provision of care and education for children, interpret current provision within the context of the values and policies which underpin them. The inclusion of an international perspective enables a critique of western ideas of the early years as a significant phase of provision. Reflective practice provides a framework for critical reflection of policy into practice throughout the module.
 

" ["Core Topics in the Psychology of Education"]=> string(632) "By introducing participants to theory and research in important areas in the psychology of education, this module aims to broaden students' knowledge and understanding of key issues. In doing so it aims to develop skills of critical analysis, and also to enable participants to identify implications of relevant research for their practice. This will be achieved by a range of teaching methods. Key topics include thinking and reasoning; motivation; metacognition; teacher expectations; teacher-pupil and pupil-pupil interactions in learning and development, emotional intelligence in education and aspects of language development. " ["Creativity: from theory to practice in English, Media, Drama"]=> string(1003) "

Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this innovative module offers a broad-based exploration of creativity in learning/arts-based practice from a national and international perspective.

Students will be invited to reflect upon their own conceptions of creativity and creative practice, interrogating specific historical, cultural and ideological factors which have shaped different approaches. In addition to conventional seminar discussions, sessions will include practical workshops, including the opportunity to specialise in one of the following areas of study: filmmaking; game authoring; drama; creative writing.

With an emphasis on playful inquiry, the module aims to help students develop a critical awareness of theories about creative practice and associated pedagogies, particularly across a range of media platforms. For educators, it offers ways to think about the creative practice of their students but also their own creative work as educators in arts-based practice.

" ["Creativity and Education"]=> string(810) "

The Creativity and Education module will provide students with an opportunity to:

  • understand the key themes, theories and debates in the Anthropology, Psychology and Sociology of Creativity
  • examine the experiences and engagement of young people in different expressions of creativity
  • consider the extent to which creativity can be taught and its relationship to the creative work
  • explore multi-modal representations of creativity
  • explore thinking and acting creatively about Science
  • consider the relationship between design and creativity, creative lives and assessing creatively
  • consider the concept of a creative life and how to assess creatively
  • enable students to conduct a small-scale research project about creativity.

" ["Criminal Journeys: the individual and the environment"]=> string(659) "

This module will explore how crime is defined, the individual and environmental factors that are embedded within criminal convictions and how these shape trajectories towards and away from 'criminal journeys'. It brings together philosophical, psychological and sociological approaches in order to explore the complex reasons of why and how people enter the criminal justice system, and the ways in which practical social actions might help them to exit. A distinctive feature will be to draw on the accounts of people with criminal convictions and of those involved in their rehabilitation, particularly in terms of education, training and employment.

" ["Critical Perspectives on Teaching and Learning"]=> string(662) "The module explores a wide variety of research into teaching and learning practices in classrooms. Participants will engage with critiques of status quo teaching and learning practices in order to develop greater sensitivity to pedagogical and social processes. They will also critically assess different methods for researching classrooms and schools, and conduct a small piece of classroom research, in their own or another's classroom. The assessment task will focus on critical analysis of classroom activity. This module is especially recommended for students who intend to conduct classroom research as part of their dissertation or report.

" ["Critical Studies Music and Music Education"]=> string(1156) "The module will address historical, theoretical and curricular issues in music education, offering participants the opportunity to investigate and critically analyse the practical application of music teaching and learning, pedagogy and practice in its varying educational contexts. The module begins with a consideration of pedagogical approaches and their application to different musical learning contexts. This leads to an exploration of the historical context in the UK and how policy and practice reflect each other. The module moves on to discussions of the role of instrumental learning in music education and how informal learning practices are influencing instrumental teaching. Students then have the opportunity to explore issues regarding what authenticity in music education is and how this relates to music from other cultures, the role of mobile learning and new media and assessment in music education. The module is rounded off with an overview of current research in music education and how this is translated into practice. The module is discussion based, drawing on students' experiences of their own teaching and learning.

" ["Current Developments in Science Education"]=> string(766) "Current developments in Science Education critically explores contemporary research topics in science education and their significance for the skills and knowledge of those engaged in teaching and research. Topics covered in the module typically include: informal and formal science education such as museum education, public understanding of science, modelling in science education, and teaching and learning of socio-scientific issues. The list of topics is modified in light of changing research issues, and experts in their particular research field teach the sessions. The module is suitable for participants involved in science teaching in primary, secondary or tertiary education and for science educators in other fields such as museum education.

" ["Curriculum and Pedagogy: A critical evaluation of a scheme of work (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(896) "

The module examines the distinctive qualities and conceptual underpinnings of psychology education, and the implications of these for teaching, learning, and assessment. It aims to help students to become competent and reflective teachers of psychology. Students are introduced to the psychology curriculum, which covers sociology and psychology as main subjects.

Students will be expected to develop a critical and theoretical approach to these areas. They will be explored through reading and critical reflection on practice and also supported through school-based training and mentoring sessions. Practical issues such as planning lessons, schemes of work and examination specifications are explored as well as the theory underpinning the development of the psychology curriculum. These sessions aim wherever possible to bring together practice, research and educational theory.

" ["Curriculum Design and Development"]=> string(1492) "

Through seminars, lectures and workshops, the module aims to provide participants with new analytical and critical skills with regard to their curricular interests and responsibilities, in particular: an improved ability to 'read' curriculum materials, practices and policies in the light of the theoretical principles and ideological perspectives that inform them; an enhanced appreciation of the cultural and philosophical roots of issues in curriculum design and development; a better understanding of design and development strategies; and a capacity for deeper reflection on their own experience of curriculum. The role of 'economic rationalism' in driving current curriculum reforms in Britain and abroad is considered and it is contrasted with broader and more democratic agendas.

'Culture' is a key concept for the module, since curriculum is a selection from culture; thus debates around common and differentiated curricula are contextualised historically in relation to different conceptions of culture and ways of estimating the adequacy of curricula to contemporary cultures are suggested. Contents, objectives, processes and assessment are addressed as variously weighted dimensions of curriculum design and development with reference to both the classics of curriculum design literature and current writings and policies. Finally, the vital continuing roles of individual schools and teachers in this era of National Curricula is a recurring theme of the module.

" ["Curriculum Development and Learning Support"]=> string(0) "" ["Curriculum, Policy and Practice"]=> string(1242) "

Through online synchronous seminars, and asynchronous presentations, the module aims to provide participants with new analytical and critical skills with regard to their curricular interests and responsibilities, in particular:

  • an improved ability to 'read' curriculum materials, practices and policies in the light of the theoretical principles and ideological perspectives that inform them;
  • an enhanced appreciation of the philosophical roots of issues in curriculum design and development;
  • a better understanding of design and development strategies, and
  • a capacity for deeper reflection on their own experience of curriculum.
Since curriculum design is concerned with decisions about the knowledge to be taught, we spend time exploring different conceptions of knowledge. The course aims to deepen participants' understanding of the different approaches to Curriculum, linking these to relevant policy and always relating back to students' own professional practice where possible. It also explores the underlying theoretical concepts in the field. Its basis is to reject the idea that the curriculum is something to be delivered, but instead to promote the development of teachers as curriculum thinkers.

" ["Introduction to Data Analysis"]=> string(1134) "

This module is an introduction to quantitative methods for people who do not have a quantitative background or for those who want to brush up on these skills having not studied them for a while. This module is for all but those students who come from a stronger quantitative background can gain exemption from this module. The module aims to familiarise students with: basic descriptive statistics; inferential statistics, hypothesis testing and statistical significance and tests of association.

Each session will be mirrored by a practical workshop seminar where students will put the analytical techniques introduced in the lectures to use. Students will learn how to analyse a large dataset using a statistical computer package (SPSS) and will be encouraged to develop good practice in presenting and interpreting the statistics they produce. By the end of the course, students should be able to analyse critically the use of statistics in social research and to feel comfortable with handling a large scale dataset and with producing, interpreting and presenting some basic statistics of their own.

 

" ["Debates in the History of Education"]=> string(1190) "

This module offers participants the opportunity to re-think education and learning from a historical perspective and engages with enduring debates in education policy and practice. International perspectives on education, social change and inequality over the past two centuries are addressed. The module studies key themes and concepts in education in an international perspective. The range of topics include colonialism and national identity, education and the economy, youth and leisure, labour and social movements, literacy, the state and education, and childhood and social welfare.

In addressing these issues, the module draws upon themes such as justice and fairness in education as well as inequalities relating to class, gender, race and disability. A range of primary historical sources will be utilised, for example, documents and archives, literary, biographical, archival, visual and material evidence. History of education has a long research tradition which connects to both the study of history and education as well as drawing upon other humanities and social sciences.

Student work has previously been published in the History of Education Researcher.

" ["Population Studies"]=> string(772) "

This module introduces students to demography, the scientific study of populations. Focusing on demography in a global context allows students to compare - and, thus, more deeply understand - trends in fertility, mortality, migration, family structure, and population growth across regions of the globe, and their relationship to population health.

Students will learn basic calculations that are central to demography, including population growth rates and various measures of mortality and fertility. Through in-class activities and out of class assignments, students will examine global variation in demographic patterns and their social, economic, political and cultural determinants. Additionally, students will be introduced to the life course approach.

" ["Describing and Analysing Language"]=> string(786) "This module deals with the nature of human languages, their structure at various levels and the descriptions of that structure. Using a variety of techniques, the module will encourage participants to study and apply analytic tools to language data. Participants will be involved in examining language in use from the perspectives of sound, meaning and structure; how this language varies both over time and geographically, and how it relates to both teachers and learners. Participants will analyse these significant patterns in discourse, phrases, clauses and sentences, transcribe speech sounds using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), characterise samples of language in terms of channel and register, and describe patterns of linguistic variation and change.

" ["Design and Use of Technologies for Education"]=> string(815) "

This module provides a critical introduction to key theories and methodologies relevant to learning with technologies in face-to-face, online and 'blended' settings. The module aims to help students develop a critical awareness of the potential and realities of technology-enhanced learning (TEL) - emphasising the design, development and evaluation of the whole learning environment. This includes a focus on the teacher/lecturer as both the designer, source of knowledge needed for design and as a user of technology, a range of technological tools (both new and old) and a focus on the learner and learning. Case studies of innovative teaching and learning initiatives are used to provide a basis for critical examination of the current trends and future directions for technology design use in education.

" ["Designing a Research Study"]=> string(674) "This is the third module of the PG Dip in Social Science Research Methods which provides students with an opportunity to develop their own small scale research project and to undertake it with the support of a research tutor. This module gives the student insight into life as a research student and will enable him or her to explore their suitability for further research study. By the end of the module students will be able to undertake a small scale research project by creating workable research questions, selecting suitable research strategies, research designs and research methods, and they will be able to defend their choices and deliver a project successfully." ["Designing, Conducting and Evaluating Educational and Social Research"]=> string(2288) "

This distance learning module is designed to provide participants with knowledge and understanding of the theoretical foundations, processes and practices of educational, and social research and evaluation, and to enable them to apply this to the critical evaluation, design and conduct of research and evaluation in areas related to inspection and regulation.

The module aims to:

  • enable participants to understand and evaluate research in education and related areas
  • help to identify and critically engage with research and other literature relevant to participants' research interests
  • introduce a wide range of approaches to educational and social research
  • consider key issues in the design and conduct of research, including ethical considerations to ensure the rigour and validity of findings
  • examine the relationship between theory, practice and empirical research
  • provide an introduction to and experience of common data collection techniques
  • explore the principles of and techniques for qualitative and quantitative data analysis
  • assist participants in the development of coherent and informed research proposals
  • consider the presentation, writing and dissemination of research.

Session titles are:

  • Session 1: Comparing Real World and Academic Research
  • Session 2: Research Designs
  • Session 3: Research Methods
  • Session 4: Epistemology
  • Session 5: Qualitative Data Analysis
  • Session 6: Quantitative Data Analysis
  • Session 7: Approached to Evaluation
  • Session 8: Writing and Communicating Research

The module is assessed through a 5,000 word assignment: including the development of a research proposal, with explanatory notes, and a critical commentary on an existing body of research. Both of these elements of the assignment allow inspectors to demonstrate their understanding of key elements of module content. The research proposal may also allow participants to position themselves advantageously with regard to their own emergent research agendas, e.g. MA dissertation, further study or practitioner research in their own workplaces.



" ["Developing a Research Proposal"]=> string(607) "This is the last of four modules that make up the PG Dip in Social Science Research Methods. It introduces students to each of the stages required to complete a successful research proposal for a research degree or for another purpose. It provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate the skills they have developed over the programme and to work with the tutor to develop a funding application for an ESRC studentship. By the end of the module students will be able to create a credible research proposal for a funding body, and to assess whether they are suitable to undertake further research." ["Developing Leaders (M-level)"]=> string(881) "You may be able to choose this module as an external option on a number of UCL Institute of Education (IOE) Masters programmes, but please note that prior relevant experience is an entry requirement. Please check with the module administrator if you are unsure.

This module, designed by the London Centre for Leadership in Learning (LCLL) aims to meet the growing demand and need for quality leadership development in schools. The activities within the module develop confidence and leadership skills for middle leaders enabling impact on practice is managing and leading change. The module is ideal for participants who have been leading teams for at least two years such as heads of subject, year, faculty, house and cross-curricular in all phases of education. It is also suitable for those leading teams of administrators or teaching assistants.

" ["Developing Mentoring Practices"]=> string(1666) "

This module has been designed to enable those working in schools or colleges as mentors to enhance their mentoring practices. Activity as Mentor Teachers in Partnership Schools (through IOE partnerships or others) will form some aspect with participants bringing to the module their practices and evidence of working with beginning or continuing teachers. It has six units:

  • Unit 1: Mentoring - building relationships
  • Unit 2: Supporting stages of initial teacher development
  • Unit 3: Challenging practice and supporting change
  • Unit 4: Record keeping and feedback
  • Unit 5: Advancing mentoring skills - mentoring more experienced teachers
  • Unit 6: "Passing on the baton" - becoming a critical friend

All participants will be expected to keep an electronic portfolio which exemplifies their practice and development. This portfolio will be used to support critical reflection in the essay submitted for summative assessment with the portfolio being monitored but not assessed. The essay will explore through critical analysis of scholarship and critical reflection of practice an aspect of participants' mentoring practice and identified ways forward for their mentoring development.

This module is taught fully online through our virtual learning environment (VLE) Moodle. Attendance for individual participants is measured through access to the material and activities, responses in forums and completion of tasks which are shared online via Keep In Touch (KIT) forums. Please contact the programme administrator for further details: ioe.aep@ucl.ac.uk

" ["Developing Personal Leadership Skills"]=> string(431) "

This module builds on the theories presented in the core modules to develop leadership skills that will benefit your organisation.

  • Improve your skills and insights as a leader and manager of people utilising a range of case studies
  • Understand team building, decision making and conflict resolution
  • Gain personal skills such as time and stress management and action planning.
" ["Developing Professional Enquiry Skills"]=> string(732) "

This module supports teachers to reflect critically on their professional development to date, assess their professional strengths and identify priorities for further development in their SEN contexts. It draws on their experiences and existing evidence of professional practice, and requires them to examine this from a critical perspective, supported by key readings on the purposes of reflection and professional learning. Teachers prepare a presentation which contextualises their professional development in relation to their school, their pupils, their specialist needs, the curriculum and their own professional enthusiasms. The presentation identifies relevant sources of support for further professional development.

" ["Developing Research Questions"]=> string(550) "This is the first module in the PG Dip in Social Science Research Methods which introduces the students to research questions and their role in the research process. The module will enables the student to develop skills in creating good research questions through a mixture of online activities and face-to-face tutorials. By the end of the module students will be able to create workable research questions, evaluate research questions of others, undertake a literature review to inform their research questions and write a workable research plan." ["Developing SEN Co-ordination Improving Learning & Teaching"]=> string(62) "Please contact administrator for more information.

" ["Developing SEN Co-ordination: Leading and Managing Change"]=> string(62) "Please contact administrator for more information.

" ["Developing The Role of The Higher or Further Education Tutor (H-level)"]=> string(939) "This module, which has a special focus on the distant or 'outreach' tutor, has been specifically developed to provide a professional development course for HE and FE tutors. It has been designed for tutors to reflect on their own role as responsible tutors when managing the teaching and learning within their own context of work in order to develop students' learning. The module offers guidelines about the responsibilities that tutors undertake, especially in relation to the programme or course within which their modules might be set. Effective use of virtual learning environments is included in discussions of learning and teaching. It is expected that participants will also follow the module Assessing Colleagues Learning. Participants are expected to submit coursework evidencing their reading in the field and their reflections upon their experience or expected experience of being a Tutor or leader in their course.

" ["Developing The Role of The Higher or Further Education Tutor (M-level)"]=> string(940) "This module, which has a special focus on the distant or 'outreach' tutor, has been specifically developed to provide a professional development course for HE and FE tutors. It has been designed for tutors to reflect on their own role as responsible tutors when managing the teaching and learning within their own context of work in order to develop students' learning. The module offers guidelines about the responsibilities that tutors undertake, especially in relation to the programme or course within which their modules might be set. Effective use of virtual learning environments is included in discussions of learning and teaching. It is expected that participants will also follow the module Assessing Colleagues Learning. Participants are expected to submit coursework evidencing their reading in the field and their reflections upon their experience or expected experience of being a Tutor or leader in their course.

" ["Developing Understanding in English, Media, Drama Studies"]=> string(1027) "

This module serves as an opportunity for newly or recently-qualified teachers to reflect on and deepen their understanding of English studies, including Media and Drama, across the secondary sector. It aims to:

  • provide a rich and rewarding experience of continuing professional development so as to enhance understanding of key aspects of the field of study and practice within the professional community of English teachers
  • promote habits of analysis and critical reflection on practical teaching and encourage module participants to challenge orthodoxies and critically evaluate the assumptions that underlie policy and practice
  • provide a critical, research-aware and enquiry-led approach to teaching and learning in English, Drama and Media.
Individual sessions focus on specific aspects of the English, Media and Drama curriculum, providing knowledge and understanding of the framework of statutory and non-statutory requirements as well as of current developments in the field.

" ["Development Education in the Era of Globalisation"]=> string(1043) "

This online module aims to develop greater understanding of the theory and practice of development education within the context of learning and living within a global society. It addresses the relevance of learning about development and global issues within the context of skills for a global economy and debates on complex and multiple identities. The module demonstrates the connections between development education more generally and current debates about the roles and purpose of education both within the UK and internationally.

As a result of completing this module, students will have:

  • greater understanding of the relationship between debates on globalisation and development education
  • developed skills to critically assess approaches to development education within diverse countries
  • be able to assess how development education relates to the discourses on global citizenship
  • gain an appreciation of the challenges development education practitioners face in a range of countries.
    • " ["Developmental Language Impairment (City)"]=> string(149) "This module is offered by City University. Please contact Kim Reynolds for further information.

      " ["Developmental Psychology"]=> string(527) "

      Assumptions about human development underpin contemporary debates and social policies. Yet how much can be known and what are the strengths and limitations of existing research? This module offers an advanced treatment of issues in typical development focusing on aspects of perceptual, emotional and cognitive development. It illustrates the differences between biological, behavioural, cognitive, and cultural perspectives and considers their compatibility. It is taught by active researchers in developmental psychology." ["Developmental Psychology and Psychobiology"]=> string(253) "

      This module provides an advanced analysis of child development with an exploration of topics in perceptual, cognitive and emotional development. It acknowledges the potential contribution of both nature and nurture and draws on research evidence.

      " ["Digital Design Thinking and Making"]=> string(1014) "

      This module will examine how design thinking can drive the development of novel digital technology that fosters cultural and learning opportunities and practices. Weeks 1-3 of the module will focus on how design thinking can support the development of desirable and feasible technologies for digital cultures and education, and why this approach can transform the ways in which we have traditionally approached digital design within these domains. It will introduce students to the features and methods of the design process and the role of design thinking in mobilising communities of designers, learners and educators (e.g. DIY communities, Open Innovation, Design Making). Weeks 4-10 will unpack the design process starting from the design concept all the way to digital prototyping. Students will carry out project-based design work during which they will craft their own design questions and employ design methods, toward developing a digital prototype (e.g. sensor-based technologies, digital games).

      " ["Digital Games and Play"]=> string(636) "

      This module is aimed at students interested in studying digital games, player cultures, games-making and media education. The module combines workshops, game play and analysis, practical sessions and online tasks.

      In part one of the module, students are introduced to game studies, literature on rules, narrative, role, genre and navigation, and methods of game analysis. In part two, the module focuses on player studies, to cover topics such as gender, fandom and learning within player communities. In part three, students have an opportunity to make games, and explore relevant research on games within media education.

      " ["Digital Media Theory"]=> string(845) "

      This module provides a critical overview of key concepts, theories and developments within the interdisciplinary fields of media studies, digital culture and cultural studies. It offers a foundation in the concepts that will be applied and developed across the different areas throughout the programme. 

      The module introduces key aspects of media and cultural studies including: the analysis of texts and the relationships between texts and audiences, questions of power and ideology, and approaches to identity and subjectivity. It will include large group lectures in which key issues and theorists will be introduced. These lectures will be followed by seminars, each tailored to the three programme routes (critical studies, education, or production), in which relevant concepts will be explored in greater depth.

      " ["Digital Technologies for Mathematical Learning"]=> string(886) "

      This is an online module, with two optional face-to-face contact based sessions. Throughout the course, you will be given opportunities to familiarise yourself with a wide range of digital tools and resources (graph plotters, dynamic geometry environments, statistical software, fully interactive online packages).

      You will be encouraged and supported to critically appraise research to reflect on the implications of using digital technologies for learning and teaching of mathematics in the areas of generalising, expressing, visualising and modelling.

      You will study in a flexible way that works for you, guided by a set weekly timetable. Over the ten week module you will follow three cycles of reading relevant research, task design and trials, followed by critical evaluation of the technology-enhanced learning experiences of maths and science.

      " ["Discourse, Society and Culture"]=> string(1129) "

      Contemporary approaches to language learning and teaching emphasise the development of communicative competence, a concept which requires an understanding of how language is used in real social contexts. This module introduces you to the main approaches and key issues involved in analysing spoken and written discourse. Topics and approaches include the ethnography of communication, linguistic pragmatics, interactional sociolinguistics, intercultural communication, genre analysis, corpus analysis and critical discourse analysis.

      You will be encouraged to work on language data of your choice, which could be drawn from settings as diverse as classrooms, internet chat rooms, newspaper columns or radio phone-ins. The module will examine genres as different as casual conversation, interviews, newspaper articles, and academic discourse, exploring the influence of social context on meaning and how cultural and community assumptions influence the ways we understand and interact with others. Sessions will be organised around a combination of lectures and group discussions, some of which will be student led.

      " ["Discovering Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods"]=> string(942) "

      This module focuses on how to design and conduct a research project. In so doing it introduces different approaches to data collection and analysis for both quantitative and qualitative research. Through the module students will learn to formulate research questions and link them to appropriate methods; they will practice interviewing and ethnography; they will gain an understanding of working with both qualitative and quantitative data and they will learn the preliminary steps of data analysis including the use of the software SPSS. Students will also engage with relevant scholarly work to be able to critically evaluate their own research practices. As part of the assignment they will produce a poster and a research report where they will bring together the experiences of data collection and analysis gained during the course. The module comprises lectures with a group-work element, small seminar groups and IT workshops.

      " ["Discovering Quantitative and Qualitative Methods"]=> string(942) "

      This module focuses on how to design and conduct a research project. In so doing it introduces different approaches to data collection and analysis for both quantitative and qualitative research. Through the module students will learn to formulate research questions and link them to appropriate methods; they will practice interviewing and ethnography; they will gain an understanding of working with both qualitative and quantitative data and they will learn the preliminary steps of data analysis including the use of the software SPSS. Students will also engage with relevant scholarly work to be able to critically evaluate their own research practices. As part of the assignment they will produce a poster and a research report where they will bring together the experiences of data collection and analysis gained during the course. The module comprises lectures with a group-work element, small seminar groups and IT workshops.

      " ["Distance Online Education & Training"]=> string(1197) "This module is available by e-learning [10 weeks] or over 5 weeks as 'blended' learning. It provides an e-learning experience, as well as the opportunity to investigate the relevance of new technologies to education. It will focus especially on essential principles of teaching, learning, lesson planning, and course design as they can be supported by technology. It presents a systematic approach, and stimulates a critical appraisal of on-site as well as distance study, viewing the various technologies as teaching aids, rather than a set of technical gadgets demanding to be used. Participants will gain a clear vision of the scope of ICT for education and an improved understanding of the relation between technology and pedagogy. Participants are advised to write an essay that can form the basis of something that will be of practical value to themselves professionally, such as a proposal for a new course design, an academic paper on their action research, a review of a selection of literature of their choice, a short account of a new development involving ICT, etc., and/or a reflective account of their own learning during the e-learning process of the course itself.

      " ["Doing and Using Educational Leadership and Management Research"]=> string(863) "This module will draw on relevant and research critiques to encourage participants to reflect on and critically examine their own practice as educational leaders and managers who make use of and undertake research and make informed judgements about the utility of those different approaches. Participants will apply the principles of research deign to formulate research questions and select appropriate research methods and/or identify existing data sets appropriate for answering those questions. This will include reviewing published literature, identifying research problems, handling data, interpreting results, and disseminating findings in a way that it is consistent with professional practice and normal principles of research ethics. Participants will also explore how to use educational enquiry for institutional and individual development.

      " ["Early Childhood Education"]=> string(898) "

      This module covers key issues in the education and care of children under eight years old, focusing particularly on provision made in early childhood settings for children from birth to five (the current English Early Years Foundation Stage). The module is of interest to those concerned with early childhood provision in the UK and also to those with experience of other, international, contexts. It will introduce students to a range of critical theories and recent research on young children's learning.

      Content includes a critical examination of the relationship between educational research, curriculum, evaluation and practice in early childhood education. The module incorporates a range of research and policy debates in early childhood education, diversity within provision and practice across a range of early years contexts, and current debates in early childhood education.

      " ["Economics of Developing Countries"]=> string(644) "

      In this module, we cover the fundamental topics of economics of developing countries. This includes the literature on growth, income inequality and poverty, health and fertility, education, market failures and trade.

      The purpose of the module is twofold. First, to understand the interplay between politics and institutions on growth rates, income inequality and poverty in a developing country context. Second, to understand and apply formal, but relatively simple, economic models.

      We will discuss papers that use econometrics to derive empirical results, thereby increasing your understanding of an economist's 'tool kit'.

      " ["Economic Sociology"]=> string(622) "

      This module is concerned with the ways in which economic life and economic institutions are embedded with the larger social structure. We consider how social norms and ongoing social relationship influence economic transactions, economic efficiency and outcomes.

      Topics covered include trust, social capital, ethnic enclave and ethnic economy, different forms of welfare capitalism, philanthropy and the third sector, residential segregation, altruism and reciprocity, and the moral economy. We take an explicit comparative approach, stressing the diverse forms in which societies and economies are organised.

      " ["Economic Perspectives of Education Policy"]=> string(764) "

      The economics of education applies the principles of economics to the analysis of education and education policy. This module is designed to give an overview of the entire field of economics of education to students who are new to economics, as well as to those who have previously studied in this field. The module introduces the most fundamental and important concepts in economics and explains how they relate to education. Human capital theory and its application to estimating rates of return to education are examined. The demand for education and education supply by providers (both state and private) are studied. The main criteria for evaluating policy efficiency and equity are applied throughout the module, and to different stages of education.

      " ["Economics of Higher Education"]=> string(848) "

      This third year undergraduate module examines critical trends and issues facing students, graduates, universities and the taxpayer � i.e. the key stakeholders in higher education. It will utilise frameworks and theories from economics to better understand the costs, benefits, and incentives universities and students face and will teach the basic principles of empirical economic research while presenting key research papers in the economics of higher education.

      Students will become familiar with key concepts, facts, and trends regarding higher education, including: university revenue sources and the drivers of expenditures, efforts to improve socio-economic gaps in participation and attainment, the many roles of financial aid, higher education and the labour market, and the debate about higher education accountability.

      " ["Economics of Public Policy"]=> string(445) "

      This module will provide students with a broad, up-to-date introduction to the economic analysis of public policy issues, including some guest lectures from the Institute for Fiscal Studies on current public policy issues. The module will draw on, and expand, the analytical tools learnt in the first year Economics. This will include new empirical tools that will allow a sound economic analysis of key contemporary public policy issues.

      " ["Educating Minorities, Migrants and Refugees"]=> string(617) "

      Educating Minorities, Migrants and Refugees (EMMR) module will offer students an opportunity to consider:

      • both the sociological positioning of the minorities, migrants and refugees in education
      • policy approaches to educating minority populations
      • philosophical questions about inclusivity and rights to education
      • a more comparative perspective on how different national education systems approach the issue and opportunity of minorities, migrants and refugees, and
      • how in turn these groups find strategies for succeeding within or challenging such provision.

      " ["Educating and Organising for Social Justice"]=> string(1135) "

      The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the theory and history of using education as part of collective efforts to try to create a more democratic, equal, just and sustainable society than the one we live in currently. In an age of global financial, environmental, political and cultural crisis, many now argue for the need to radically rethink education and reorient the core goals of learning to directly address the challenge of social justice.

      The module looks closely at key concepts, traditions and thinkers in the fields of popular education, critical pedagogy and community organising and it examines both the role of education in collective efforts to transform society, and the role of collective organising in efforts to transform schooling and education. Finally, alongside core lectures and seminars, the module provides students with a hands-on opportunity to learn community organising skills and participate in a local community organising project. See the project from 2017

      " ["Educating for Employment? Understanding Learning in the 21st Century Economy"]=> string(686) "

      Students will critically reflect, question and analyse the purpose of education and the dominant beliefs regarding the relationships between education, labour markets and the economy. Exploring education in a range of formal and informal contexts, using theoretical insights and connecting with empirical research, they will gain an understanding of how social scientists have conceptualised and studied work and employees, how the nature of work has changed alongside a changing national and global economy and how workers are produced in different contexts to serve the needs of the labour market and how this impacts upon individual fulfilment and social justice and equality.

      " ["Education and Development in Asia"]=> string(1515) "

      This module will examine the relationship between education (primarily at the level of schooling), state formation and patterns of economic growth in selected Asian countries and regions. It will be informed by a critique of various concepts of 'development', and will focus in particular on controversies relating to the significance of trends such as globalisation, cultural identity and autonomy in the developing world. While it will feature discussion of the relationship between education and economic development, the conceptualisation of 'development' adopted here will extend beyond a concern with GDP and poverty reduction, to broader considerations of the role of education in the search for Asian models of 'modernity'.

      Key themes will include the role of skills formation strategies in the East Asian 'Economic Miracle', the contribution of education to nation-building and identity formation, and the implications of globalisation (both cultural and economic) for education policy in Asia. A particular focus will be the tension in education policies in China, India and elsewhere between an elitist pursuit of high skills seen as crucial to competitiveness in the 'global knowledge economy', and the promotion of basic education for the masses with a view to fostering greater equality of opportunity and 'social cohesion'. The dangers inherent in the relationship between education (particularly schooling) and nationalism in East and South Asia are another major theme of this module.

      " ["Education and International Development: Concepts, Theories and Issues"]=> string(650) "

      This module introduces a range of concepts from the social and political sciences that assist the understanding and analysis of the relationship between education, learning and international development in low and middle income countries. The module also explores critically the changing links between these relationships at individual, local, national, regional, international and global levels. It introduces and discusses issues of educational policy and practice in low and middle income countries. This module is also available on a distance learning basis beginning in the autumn term studied through virtual learning environment Moodle.

      " ["Education and Muslim Communities"]=> string(1082) "

      This module will primarily focus on exposing participants to the historical, geographical, political, economic and cultural underpinnings of education in a host of Muslim communities. It will elucidate the state of education and seek understanding and explanation of such educational provision in the light of global declarations such as: Education for All (Dakar 2000, Jomtien 1990); Human Rights Declaration (1948); and the universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity (UNESCO 2002), which have been ratified by the vast majority of the world's countries.

      The module will therefore critically investigate current global efforts and approaches to improve educational provision. National and regional case studies will be presented to illuminate the interconnected areas of concern and issues and challenges to appreciate education in Muslim communities. Case studies will reflect the geographical range of Muslim communities: majoritarian Muslim countries, countries with significant Muslims, and regions where the settlement of Muslims is a relatively new phenomena.

      " ["Education and Technology: Key Issues and Debates"]=> string(1576) "

      The use of digital technology is now a central part of education provision and practice. This module introduces students to some of the key issues in the field and addresses some fundamental and often unvoiced questions about the burgeoning development and implementation of digital technologies in education. Some of the key questions we will consider are:

      • What are the benefits and limitations of concepts such as 'technology-enhanced learning' or 'blended learning' for educational practices?
      • How do theories of learning affect the way in which educational technology is studied and used?
      • To what extent do 'improving learning' and 'making education fairer' represent competing goals in debates about educational technology?
      • How can social theory, including theories of globalisation and new modes of knowledge production, be used to analyse the implications for technology use in the classroom?
      • How can the significance of social media and telepresence for education be theorised?
      • What are the principle barriers to the use of educational technology in the classroom and how could they be overcome?
      • How has technology use outside education shaped understanding of its risks and benefits in education?
      • Education and technology - what possible futures?

      The module involves student engagement with the research literature, use of education technology resources and tools, staged writing activities, and online practical and collaborative activities, building up to work for the assignment.

      " ["Education and Technology: Key Issues and Debates (online/mixed)"]=> string(1576) "

      The use of digital technology is now a central part of education provision and practice. This module introduces students to some of the key issues in the field and addresses some fundamental and often unvoiced questions about the burgeoning development and implementation of digital technologies in education. Some of the key questions we will consider are:

      • What are the benefits and limitations of concepts such as 'technology-enhanced learning' or 'blended learning' for educational practices?
      • How do theories of learning affect the way in which educational technology is studied and used?
      • To what extent do 'improving learning' and 'making education fairer' represent competing goals in debates about educational technology?
      • How can social theory, including theories of globalisation and new modes of knowledge production, be used to analyse the implications for technology use in the classroom?
      • How can the significance of social media and telepresence for education be theorised?
      • What are the principle barriers to the use of educational technology in the classroom and how could they be overcome?
      • How has technology use outside education shaped understanding of its risks and benefits in education?
      • Education and technology - what possible futures?

      The module involves student engagement with the research literature, use of education technology resources and tools, staged writing activities, and online practical and collaborative activities, building up to work for the assignment.

      " ["Education in the Age of Globalisation"]=> string(678) "

      This optional Year 1 module introduces students to some of the key issues affecting the contemporary global education context. The module focuses particularly on Robert Arnove's notion of education as being a 'dialectic between the global and the local' (2007), by stressing the ways in which formal education systems represent local needs, cultures and histories while also reflecting wider global influences. Some of the key issues discussed include: the impact of global testing regimes; the rise of 'internationalisation' strategies in schools and universities; and the tensions and opportunities afforded by increasing multiculturalism, both in the UK and elsewhere.

      " ["Education Traditions and Systems in Europe"]=> string(1137) "

      This module will examine some of the major traditions of education in Europe with an emphasis on secondary schooling and post-compulsory education and training in the EU states. Through holistic historical and contemporary case studies of education systems in England, France, Germany, Scandinavia and Finland, and the Soviet Union, the module will analyse the significant difference in the dominant regional systems in terms of their institutional structures, curricula and modes of regulation and governance and relate these to the varying political, cultural and economic contexts which shape them.

      The module will employ comparative methods to identify convergent and divergent trends within European education, to analyse their causes and to assess the role of EU institutions in addressing the important policy dilemmas that face education in Europe. The analysis of these trends will be used to test the claims of a number of theories on system change. The module will also discuss how the different education systems respond to contemporary pressures and issues such as school choice, competitiveness and diversity.

      " ["Education Values and Society: Social Science Perspectives 1"]=> string(545) "

      Please note that this module is only available to students on the BA (Hons) Education Studies

      The module is designed to support an understanding of the influence of a variety of positions on contemporary topics of concern to educationalists, such as social justice and equality. Sessions will be underpinned by a consideration of philosophical, sociological and historical perspectives on education and their distinctive contributions to understanding the relationship between education, values and society.

      " ["Education, Conflict and Fragility"]=> string(1489) "

      This module critically explores complex interactions between education, armed conflict and state fragility. It examines the role of education in the formation and prevention of socio-political tensions in low and middle-income countries and provides an opportunity to debate the key political and sociological theories in the field of education and conflict studies. Students engage in the analysis of education both as an instrument that is complicit in reproducing socioeconomic divisions as well producing a critical mass of learners who resist inequalities and social injustices. The multitude of ways violent conflicts and state fragility impact upon marginalised groups, including children, the intersection with inequalities associated with poverty, gender and ethnicity, and the gender dimensions of conflict, are also considered.

      In addition to formal lectures and seminars on the module, students will also be encouraged to participate in institutional visits and engage with the work of various international non-governmental organisations that support education in low and middle-income countries. This will not only provide an opportunity to gain insights into current policy debates and development priorities in the field but also a networking opportunity with practitioners and policy makers. A large number of our students who come from conflict-affected societies or with an experience in such environments create a unique learning space on the module.

      " ["Education, Ethics and Imagination in a Globalising World"]=> string(1454) "

      Recent decades have seen a flurry of research and publication on the role of imagination and ethics in education. This is for several reasons. There is a growing anthropological, neurological and entrepreneurial interest in creativity. There is also a widespread belief that the influence of globalisation on education has generally led to a disproportionate emphasis on subjects and pedagogies that privilege instrumental interest of reason at the expense of critical, imaginative and ethical spaces in educational practice. The latter reason has led to the calls for a deeper and active integration of ethics and imagination in educational theory and practice.

      With imagination and ethics as central elements, the module will have three inter-related strands: a critical introduction to debates about the nature of globalisation with a particular focus on education; an in-depth exploration of imagination and ethics, their dialectic and place in education; and, application of theoretical insights to concrete curricular contexts. Course readings, classroom teaching and student assignments � all of these pedagogical elements will aim to help students apply ideas to their own cultural and national contexts. Overall, the participants will acquire analytical and pedagogical tools to observe, understand and critique structures of power and hegemony perpetuated through globalising nature of knowledge production and dissemination.

      " ["Education, Religion and State: historical and contemporary developments"]=> string(1065) "

      Almost everywhere religion has become increasingly relevant for making sense of the society, including understanding education. This module is an invitation to explore the complex relationship between education and religion. This will include exploring their historical relationship, the impact of the modern state, range of contemporary debates in various parts of the world, the role of the faith schools, religion and human rights, religious diversity, extremism, and issues to do with identity formation.

      The module will be particularly relevant for students seeking to:

      • become teachers of Religion Education (RE), Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) and Citizenship
      • engage in youth work or community engagement, or
      • wanting to prepare for further academic study.
      Overall, this module will help students develop critical and informed understanding of the changing landscape of religion and how it relates to the educational processes, systems and approaches, in various societal and historical contexts.

      " ["Education, Values and Society"]=> string(556) "This module starts with a discussion of philosophy and sociology generally, and then applies philosophical and sociological thinking to fundamental educational questions, for example, what is the purpose of education? What is equality? Why do there appear to be consistent gender, class and ethnic differences in achievement? We will evaluate answers to these questions and relate them to broader values in society. We will take a co-constructive approach to learning that will ensure everyone is an active contributor and expect some lively debate. " ["Educational Testing"]=> string(596) "

      The Educational Testing module offers an overview of the main principles and concepts in educational assessment as well as different traditions of test construction, including the more psychometric approaches found in the US and elsewhere. It is an introductory module for students will little or no statistical training. It focuses on test construction, approaches to awarding, comparability and equating, including comparisons with other systems. It explores how assessment is used to reinforce government policies and considers future trends, such as the increasing use of e-assessment.

      " ["Effective Learning and Teaching in Schools (ELTIS)"]=> string(1207) "

      Please note that this module is no longer running.

      ELTIS is an off-site, school-based module, only offered to cohorts of 12 or more students.

      The module is designed to provide a foundation for developing teacher enquiry within practice-based master's level study, with a focus on building teachers' capacity to respond to pedagogical initiatives in ways which are critically informed.

      The module focuses on exploring the learning of individual pupils by examining routinely occurring classroom practice in relation to key readings, research and policy documentation. Participants prepare to take action as a result, and make an action plan which demonstrates both critical reflection on practice and independent engagement with the ideas found in the reading material.

      The module is being created for schools that require a content rich experience with face-to-face teaching appropriate to the school-based situation. The module will provide the opportunity for school participants to work together whilst engaging in face-to-face sessions with UCL Institute of Education (IOE) tutors and appropriate readings and tasks.



      " ["Effective Learning In History"]=> string(486) "

      The intention of this module is to bring together what is known specifically about young people's historical thinking with wider insights from pedagogical research to equip history teachers to act as effective curriculum designers. It will explore ways of enabling learners with diverse needs to make meaningful progress, and encourage collaborative approaches to professional development that acknowledge both the voice of the learners and the value of reflective practice.

      " ["Elites, Education and Inequalities"]=> string(448) "

      This module aims to introduce students to the concept of 'elites' and consider how these groups are shaping the geographies, educational opportunities and cultural imaginaries of our lives. Through this module you will explore how we define 'elite', who and how you become elite, the effect of being educated in elite spaces, how elites shape our everyday lives, and how we can all play a role in challenging inequalities in our communities.

      " ["Engineering and Education: Practice, Innovation and Leadership"]=> string(1005) "

      The overarching aim of the module is to support anyone working in the fields of engineering in further or higher education, engineering education, human resource, policy, or as an engineering consultant, to understand the relationship between education, workplace learning and the formation of engineering expertise. To do so, the module will:

      • provide an overview of the global context of engineering, including its changing skills needs, and of national and transnational policies to support the development of engineering in further and higher Education,
      • introduce a number of perspectives on the concepts of curriculum, knowledge and learning, and
      • provide a number of issues or case study sessions.
      Participants then use the new understanding they have developed to critically appraise or rethink work practice in engineering or teaching and learning practice in educational institutions or in policy development for engineering education and skill development.

      " ["Engineering Learning and Teaching: Perspectives and Issues"]=> string(750) "

      This module is ideal for both aspiring and practising engineering educators who wish to gain knowledge and expertise on the latest techniques for learning, teaching and assessment in engineering. Trainers in industry who wish to gain deeper insights into engineering education will also find the module relevant to their own practice.

      Individual module sessions will be led by practising engineering educators and knowledge experts who have achieved recognition for championing and leading innovation in learning and teaching in engineering. Module participants will explore key issues and debates in engineering learning and teaching and learn how to adapt current innovations in learning and teaching to their own educational practice.

      " ["English in Diverse World Contexts"]=> string(978) "

      This module deals with the role of English in diverse world contexts. It provides a theoretical background to the global spread of English from the perspectives of globalisation theory, postcolonial theory and the politicisation of world Englishes. It examines English as an international language and as a Lingua Franca, and explores different regions of the world with regard to English language education policy and the effects of English in these contexts. Regions covered include East Asia, South Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, Central and South America, and the countries of the Anglophone inner circle'. The impact of English in cyberspace is also explored.

      Students taking this module can expect critical engagement in discussions about the role of English in the world today, as well as in the beliefs about what this should be. Sessions will be organised around a combination of lectures and group discussions, some of which will be student led.

      " ["English, Media, Drama (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(651) "

      This module serves as a broad introduction to and foundation for teaching English studies, including Media and Drama, across the secondary sector. Individual sessions focus on specific aspects of the English curriculum, providing knowledge and understanding of the National Curriculum together with an understanding of the framework of statutory and non-statutory requirements. The module draws on the range and variety of the subject knowledge that students bring with them onto the course and enables students to reconfigure this knowledge in the context of their developing experience of teaching and learning in London secondary classrooms.

      " ["Enhancing Learning and Teaching in Higher Education"]=> string(1171) "

      The module will start by outlining a number of future learning and teaching scenarios, for example, new face-to-face pedagogic strategies such as 'flipped lectures' or digital-based learning and teaching approaches, including MOOCs, to provide students with a theoretically informed yet practically grounded framework to identify ways in which learning and teaching can be both enhanced and developed innovatively, depending on institutional needs, in their own professional contexts. Drawing on the above and other ideas, students will then analyse their context and produce a qualitative or quantitative-informed discussion paper or report for assessment. Irrespective of which option a student selects individual, they will work together in professional learning groups with a tutor to support their collective and individual development and, depending on student choice this support could be face-to-face or on-line.

      This module is linked to the 60 credit Certificate in the MA Professional Education and Training. Applicants must be currently teaching in higher education or an equivalent context, with at least two years full or part time experience.

      " ["Digital Media Enquiry"]=> string(744) "

      This module provides a critical overview of research practices within the fields of media studies and cultural studies. Students will engage with humanities, arts-based, sociological and mixed-method approaches to research. They will explore methods appropriate to the study of popular culture and media texts, audiences, learners and makers within offline and online contexts.

      The module is intended to help preparing for the independent research required for dissertations and reports. Students will take part in lectures, demonstrations, presentations, seminars, group tasks and discussions. It will include large group lectures followed by seminars in which key approaches are explored in greater depth across the three routes.

      " ["Environment and Climate Change"]=> string(565) "

      This module introduces students to the politics, the sociology, and the economics of the environment and climate change. Topics covered include the changing public opinion on climate change and the social bases of pro-environment attitudes, the prisoner dilemma, tragedy of the commons, and the challenge of organising effective international response. We also consider the likely economic and social impact of climate change, including the distributional implications at the national and global levels, and ethical issues such as inter-generational equity.

      " ["Ethics and Research in Education"]=> string(676) "

      This module aims to:

      • Develop an awareness of the purposes and assumptions underlying forms of research commonly used by educational and other social science researchers
      • Develop a critical stance towards research and its uses
      • Further develop skills required for critical reading and reflexive, academic writing of practitioner research
      • Develop an awareness of the issues regarding, and the implications of, different research methods
      • Develop an awareness and sensitivity towards ethics in relation to researching in schools generally as well as researching and working with young people.


      " ["Ethnography"]=> string(829) "

      The module provides training in advanced ethnographic methods. Students will review issues relating to theory, design, data collection,field notes and analysis with the aim of enabling an appreciation of the challenges of doing ethnographies. By the end of the course, students should be able to analyse critically ethnographic research and feel comfortable with carrying out this type of research on their own and be aware of the ethical considerations and the role they play in the research process. This module will cover topics on:

      • ethnography and theory
      • studying how society works
      • key ethnographic studies
      • field notes
      • new challenges to doing ethnography
      • ethical issues
      • study sites and participants
      • reflexivity
      • cutting edge ethnographies

      " ["Evaluation and Inspection for Educational Improvement"]=> string(1296) "

      This module aims to deepen participants' knowledge and understanding of the nature of inspection, regulation, audit and evaluation and its relation to institutional or organisational improvement drawing upon the most recent research and writing about inspection and its effect on development.

      The module aims to:

      • develop in participants an understanding of the key concepts and models in the academic and professional literature relevant to inspection, regulation, institutional improvement and its practice
      • develop the capacity for critical reflection on participants' own professional practice, drawing on a range of theoretical and practice-based perspectives
      • equip participants with a body of knowledge that will improve their understanding of the management and leadership of change, institutional effectiveness and improvement
      • provide analytical frameworks and research insights to enable participants to reflect on concepts, theories and models of quality control, quality assurance, quality management, external and internal (self) evaluation and quality improvement
      • provide analytical frameworks and research insights for participants to consider how they will contribute to improvement in their own role.

      " ["Evidence Based Enquiry in The Lifelong Learning Sector (Part 1)"]=> string(62) "Please contact administrator for more information.

      " ["Evidence Based Enquiry in The Lifelong Learning Sector (Part 2)"]=> string(62) "Please contact administrator for more information.

      " ["Evidence Based Practice (City)*"]=> string(131) "This module is offered by City University. Please contact Kim Reynolds for further information (k.reynolds@ioe.ac.uk).

      " ["Evidence for Policy and Practice"]=> string(919) "

      This module aims to provide students with a broad introduction to the range of methods, designs and approaches used in social research and encourage a critical appreciation of the opportunities, benefits and challenges of using research evidence to inform and influence social policy and professional practice. Illustrative examples drawn from different policy contexts are used throughout the module to support the theoretical material. Although much of the material refers to the UK policy context, the focus of the module is international and students attend with an interest in a range of social policy sectors and disciplines.

      Students participate in workshops in a classroom at the IOE or at a distance via Moodle, our virtual learning environment. Workshops will be recorded and made available on Moodle. All students will be expected to engage in additional individual and group activities online.

      " ["Evidence-Based Practice SpLD (dyslexia)"]=> string(1381) "

      Prerequisite: you must have undertaken studies in theory underpinning reading and spelling acquisition and development either Understanding SpLD module or equivalent. You will:

      • need time with at least one learner with literacy difficulties to assess their needs through use of informal assessments and observations
      • be required to plan and teach an intervention programme for at least one learner for 30 hours
      • need to provide 3 one hour films of your teaching which will be observed with formative feedback given from an AMBDA qualified tutor.
      By the end of the module you should have developed critical understanding and knowledge from research and theories to analyse and evaluate the implications for teaching learners struggling with reading, writing and spelling. You will be expected to:
      • design and evaluate an evidence based personalised intervention
      • be able to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the key principles of learning and reflect on the aspects that underpin chosen teaching approach and any barriers to learning faced by the pupils
      • reflect on how the intervention supported pupil outcomes and demonstrate self-reflection on professional development as specialist teachers
      • suggest appropriate personalised recommendations for future intervention for the target pupil(s).

      " ["Experimental and Quasi Experimental Design"]=> string(274) "This two day introductory module is for government and other policy-related social researchers and analysts who want to know more about experimental and quasi-experimental methods, and how to use them effectively in government and policy-related research and evaluation. " ["Exploring Educational Policy"]=> string(1193) "

      This module aims to deepen participants' knowledge and understanding of the nature of educational and social policy drawing upon the most recent research and writing about policy and its formulation. Particular attention will be given to the development of policy around inspection and regulation. The module explores the complex relationships between developments in policy at global, national, local and institutional levels, thus equipping participants with a body of knowledge that will contribute towards an enhanced understanding of education and social policy. Participants also explore the implications of contemporary education and social policy, its analytical frameworks and research insights, for their everyday practices.

      The module aims to:

      • offer participants access to critical analyses of a range of influences and perspectives on contemporary education and social policy
      • enable participants to engage intellectually with the bodies of theory surrounding the globalisation of education and social policy
      • enable participants to draw on appropriate techniques in order to research, critique and develop their own practice.

      " ["Families in Society"]=> string(704) "

      This first year module introduces students to the family as a social institution and a site of personal life. The module is interdisciplinary and examines critical factors that make and shape families drawing on theoretical and empirical insights from anthropology, demography, psychology, and sociology. Themes include: kinship and family structures; new forms of couple intimacy, sexual and relational diversity; families across cultures; parenting and child development; gender and family life; ethnicity and faith in families; families, poverty and inequality; elder life and intergenerational obligations in families. The module draws on examples from societies and cultures across the world.

      " ["Financial Management"]=> string(979) "It is important for senior school leaders to understand the financial environment in which they operate and to be able to appraise it critically. In a system of devolved school management, the resources schools receive are highly dependent on the interrelationship between the school and its external environment. The value the school's stakeholders place on its learning outcomes for students determine its inflow of resources. The role of the budget in the management of not-for-profit organisations is examined in relation to strategic, managerial and operational levels of control. How expenditure decisions are made, with respect to the allocation of resources that will have the most impact on learning outcomes within budget constraints, budget planning and preparation are also examined and different approaches to budgeting outlined. The reasons for cost-effectiveness analysis being difficult in educational setting will be examined and ways forward suggested. " ["Foundations in the Sociology of Education"]=> string(677) "

      The Foundations in the Sociology of Education is a core module in the first year of the BA Education Studies at the UCL Institute of Education. The module allows students to explore current and enduring educational questions through a sociological lens and to identify the relationships between education and social inequalities. Special attention is paid to issues of social justice, inclusion/exclusion and possibilities for social transformation. The module considers various axes of power, identity and institutional organization, including sessions focused on social class, race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, intersectionality, and learner and teacher identities.

      " ["Foundations of Psychology I"]=> string(868) "

      This core year 1 module will introduce students to key concepts and ideas in the discipline of psychology. We start by investigating a brief history of Psychology, learning about significant theorists and exploring psychological methods. We then investigate fundamental topics in psychology through four of the core perspectives in the discipline, namely: developmental, biological, social and cognitive psychology.

      The module encourages students to begin to think about links between psychology and other related disciplines in the larger field of Social Science. Topics which will be covered, include relationships, mental health, persuasion, identity and parenting. Throughout, we draw on past experiments and theories from an array of global scholars, as well as real life examples, to demonstrate how relevant psychology is in our day-to-day lives.

      " ["Foundations of Psychology II"]=> string(883) "

      This module is designed to build on SOCS1002 (Foundations of Psychology I). The aim is to provide students with a grounding in key areas of psychology and provide a foundation to underpin specialised psychology modules available in Years 2 and 3. The module will continue the model introduced in SOCS1002 of presenting thematic topics within psychology from the perspectives of four key approaches: developmental, biological, social, and cognitive psychology. The module will draw on those aspects of psychology which complement other core modules and situate the psychological concepts introduced within the broader field of Social Sciences. Topics to be introduced include: altruism, aggression, prejudice, developmental disorders, cognition (intelligence and thinking), memory and forgetting, learning and behaviour, psychobiology and neuroscience, emotion, and health.

      " ["Foundations of Research Methods and Applied Data Analysis (City University)"]=> string(127) "

      This module is offered by City University. Please contact Kim Reynolds k.reynolds@ioe.ac.uk for further information.

      " ["Foundations of Science Education"]=> string(1073) "

      This module covers foundational topics essential for understanding and developing research in science education, with the aim of providing a perspective on practice. It draws on a range of relevant research and professional literature. Particular attention is given to the fluent use of concepts and theories related to the teaching and learning of science illuminating the thinking underpinning the aims, perspectives and construction of science curricula, learning theories, pedagogy and language in science education, philosophical aspects of science education, within national and international contexts.

      Through a mixed mode approach of online and face-to-face teaching and learning, participants learn to write critical reviews of academic and professional articles in science education as well as developing theoretical frameworks from which to analyse their own practice. The module is suitable for participants involved in science teaching in primary, secondary or tertiary education and for science educators in other fields such as museum education.

      " ["Fundamentals of Second and Foreign Language Teaching"]=> string(1114) "

      This module explores fundamental issues in second and foreign language learning and teaching. It is designed to enable language teachers to inform their practice through an enhanced understanding of language knowledge and processing, of pedagogical grammar and of language teaching methodologies.

      Students learn to describe and analyse the language systems (i.e. grammar, lexis, phonology, discourse) for pedagogic purposes, examining concepts such as the noun phrase and the verb phrase, discourse, lexis and lexico-grammar, and explore elements of phonology using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Students additionally enhance their understanding of processes involved in comprehending and producing language.

      The module also addresses common language teaching methodologies, with reference to form focused instruction, communicative language teaching and task-based instruction; and considers various approaches to teaching productive and receptive skills. Throughout the module there will be a focus on the notion of appropriate methodology for different educational settings.

      " ["Primary Education Policies and Practice"]=> string(1145) "

      The module provides an opportunity for participants to examine the bases for contemporary primary practice and review critically recent developments in primary education in UK and internationally. The ways in which theory and research in different disciplines (philosophical, historical, psychological and sociological) can inform and illuminate primary practice are discussed. International as well as UK perspectives and changes in primary education over time are considered.

      Session content includes an examination of the aims of primary education, systems and regulations governing primary education, the content of the curriculum, learning and teaching approaches, perspectives on education policy, relationships between home and school and futures for primary education in a global era. Throughout the programme, participants are encouraged to share and reflect on their varied experiences of primary education and to consider implications of session content for their professional practice.

      The module includes an opportunity to visit  primary schools particularly for those less familiar with the English context.

      " ["Game Theory for the Social Sciences"]=> string(590) "

      In the social sciences, we try to understand the behaviour of individuals in collective settings. In such settings, the best course of action for the individual often depends on the actions of others. For example, the decision to dress formally or informally for a dinner party depends on how we think others will be dressing.

      Game theory is the formal analysis of decision making in such interdependent situations in which an individual's best course of action depends on the actions of others. This module presents a non-technical introduction to non-cooperative game theory.

      " ["Gender, Families and Work"]=> string(998) "

      This module focuses on the interrelationships between work and family, with special attention given to gender as a significant factor affecting the nature of these relationships. Both paid and unpaid work and care are included for study. The module is international and comparative in perspective drawing in particular from Europe, Asia, and North America. It explores critical challenges of balancing responsibilities of paid work and family life, from the perspective of different stakeholders - women, men, children, and employers.

      Specific areas to be addressed include: theoretical perspectives on gender; work and family; gender variation in household divisions of care and labour; class & ethnic inequalities and reshaping of the economy; labour market and parental employment; fatherhood, motherhood and childrearing; policies to support working parents: maternity and paternity leave and flexible work arrangements; work-place cultures; gender and work utopias and dystopias.

      " ["Gender, Education and Development"]=> string(815) "

      This module aims to link work in education and international development with insights from gender and education and relate these to educational policy and practice. It is designed to develop an understanding of the circumstances in low and middle income countries, under which gender affects rights to, rights in and rights through education. The module looks at the gendered dimensions of processes of teaching and learning. It considers sexual divisions in education and the gendered political economy of family, work, political action and cultural production. Particular attention is given to gender and violence in school settings. Throughout the module there will be a concern to explore gender sensitive strategies and alternative approaches in education to overcome social division and inequalities.

      " ["Gender, Sexuality and Education"]=> string(910) "

      The module aims to encourage a critical examination of key debates concerning theory, research and practice in the field of gender and education. The module will engage with a number of key debates in the field, including: feminist theory and methodologies in educational research; analysing gender and educational policies; researching sexualities, femininities and masculinities; pedagogical approaches; gendered behaviour; educational achievement and more. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding how gender, sexuality, race and class intersect in shaping educational experiences and outcomes.

      The module will draw out important issues relating to professional practice in international contexts, providing teachers, researchers, leaders and managers, and those working in non-government organisations a forum for investigating their own interests in the field of gender and education.

      " ["Gender, Sexuality and Feminisms in Everyday Lives"]=> string(1432) "

      This module offers students the opportunity to think theoretical, empirically and experientially about how gender and sexuality imbue our social worlds. It combines a theoretically-framed engagement with these concepts, with an action-research and activist orientated approach to thinking about our experiences and those of others and evaluating the nature of these relations. Critically, the module engages directly with the concept of feminism and the ways social media is increasingly a space that entrenches dominant relations while at the same time opening up opportunities for thinking and doing gender differently. The module acknowledges that there exist a range of positions in relation to gender, and to sexuality, and the module aims to encourage each student to reflect critically on their position and their role in the reproduction and resistance to dominant/heteronormative relations. It also intends to involve students in considering the possibility of, and in potentially committing to actual public engagements on key issues raised in the module, however large or small.

      Students will be supported by their tutors in considering and participating in such engagements, ensuring students are aware of the ethics of such work and consider fully the potential risk or harm of such activities. Topics include gender and sexuality in (social) media, in education institutions, in families, in public life.

      " ["Global Issues in Education"]=> string(731) "

      This compulsory Year 2 module introduces students to some of the key issues affecting the contemporary global education context. The module focuses particularly on Robert Arnove's notion of education as being a 'dialectic between the global and the local' (2007), by stressing the ways in which formal education systems represent local needs, cultures and histories while also reflecting wider global influences.

      Some of the key issues discussed include: the notion and practice of cross-country comparison in education; the impact of global testing regimes; the practice of 'policy borrowing' (and, in some contexts, policy imposition); and the tensions and opportunities afforded by multiculturalism within schools.

      " ["Global Citizenship Education: Research, Policy and Practice"]=> string(420) "

      The module will aim to introduce learners to the key debates and discussions surrounding global citizenship education (GCE) within existing research and policy, as well as to explore examples of practice from around the world. This will include a focus on specific areas of GCE research, such as learning in the classroom, learning through personal experience (e.g. volunteering), and engagement in social action.

      " ["Growing up global: youth in comparative perspective"]=> string(1120) "

      This inter-disciplinary module aims to introduce students to the key themes, theories and debates in Youth Studies and to examine the experiences and engagement of young people in comparative perspective. Key questions that will be addressed include:

      • How and why are youth transitions being delayed (focusing on changing opportunities in education, employment, housing and family-formation)?
      • What are the implications of these changes for youth risk, resilience and well-being?
      • What are youth attitudes towards globalisation (and particularly towards cultural diversity, migration and social media)?
      • How are youth acting as agents of social change in democratic, authoritarian and/ or post-conflict societies?
      • How are national and international organisations such as the UN responding to the challenges and opportunities facing contemporary youth?
      Throughout the module, particular attention will be paid to comparing the diversity and inequalities of youth experiences, as well as to comparing youth transitions in the Global North and the Global South.

      " ["Guiding Effective Learning and Teaching"]=> string(663) "This module addresses the relationship between effective learning and teacher activity. It aims to challenge and extend thinking and professional practice through examination of learning theories and their evidence base, including learning from participants' own experiences. It aims to 'walk the talk' so that participants experience in practice some fundamental teaching and learning principles explored by the module. These include: teaching for active learning; teaching for self-directed learning; teaching for collaborative learning; and teaching for learning about learning. Assessment tasks include both group inquiry and individual reflective essays. " ["Health, Wellbeing and Society"]=> string(575) "

      This module aims to help students understand the social and economic forces which shape human health. The themes covered will include the different (social and medical) approaches to defining health; the measurement and quantification of health in the population; sources of evidence in population health and epidemiological research; critically understanding this evidence; and a series of current research topics in health research. The ultimate aim is to provide social science students the skills needed to access, appraise, and contribute to health research.

      " ["Higher Education Institutions as Organisations: Their Strategic Management"]=> string(635) "This five-day residential module will introduce participants to organisation theory and to concepts of strategic management using models from both private and public sector, as well as from higher education itself.

      The range of issues and/or concepts to be covered includes: higher education institutions' strategic management, planning, strategy, and uncertainty; organisation theories and organisational culture; new approaches to public sector management; theories of strategic management; adaptability and environmental fit; the management of change; university organisation and the place of academic disciplines.

      " ["Higher Education: Comparative and International Perspectives"]=> string(801) "

      Currently policies and practices affecting higher education (HE) around the world are strongly influenced by factors which derive from outside the relevant domestic context. Specifically, the forces of globalisation, technological change and of the influences of cross-national agencies have radically changed the frames within which HE policy makers and providers now operate within. This module sets out to investigate, analyse and critique the nature of these influences through the adoption of a perspective derived from the fields of comparative and international studies of HE. The module is compulsory for all course members of the MA in Higher and Professional Education but is also available to other UCL Institute of Education MA students with interest and involvement in the content.

      " ["History Education - Leading History Education"]=> string(925) "

      Museums, galleries and heritage sites are recognised as powerful educational resources, and many have made citizenship and history education a priority in recent years. This module builds on this period of innovation and looks across the world for relevant resources and stimuli to explore this potential and relate it to the educational opportunities provided in other settings, such as schools and lifelong learning.

      This module focuses on those topics addressed by museums, galleries and heritage sites that relate most directly to citizenship and history education. These include: cities, communities and identities; using imagination to understand other people's experiences, for example of war, violence, crime or poverty; the range of national, regional, religious and ethnic identities present in all nations and states in a globalised age; environmental issues; and the world as a global community.

      " ["History in a Wider Context (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1150) "

      This module enables students to explore and critique a generic teaching strategy or theory by planning, teaching and evaluating an enquiry of between four and six lessons. The assignment requires you to select one generic teaching focus (you will be provided with a list but it will include, for example, assessment for learning, Bloom�s Taxonomy, metacognition and setting) and to embed this into an enquiry that you plan, teach and evaluate. This will enable you to examine the generic focus critically � how far and in what ways does it help you to teach history more effectively and what are the advantages and disadvantages of applying it in a history classroom setting?

      The purpose behind this is a simple one: as a qualified teacher you will be bombarded with a plethora of new (or rediscovered) theories and strategies about teaching. Some will be a passing trend and no more, some will be based on rigorous evidence and some will not, others may work for some subjects but not others. How can you test out such theories and strategies in your own practice in order to reach a measured and informed view of their value?

      " ["How People Learn"]=> string(229) "

      This module will provide a general introduction to the processes of human learning, both as individuals and in groups and society, and in childhood and adolescence as well as in adulthood and over the lifecourse.
       

      " ["Impact Evaluation Methods"]=> string(837) "

      This interdisciplinary module introduces students to Impact Evaluation Methods and their use in the social sciences. The module will emphasise the application of quasi-experimental evaluation methods in the 'real world', and its potential impact upon government policy. Students will learn about key elements of quasi-experimental methods, and be able to critically evaluate their strengths and weaknesses.

      The module has a high practical element, with students regularly analysing data. Topics to be covered include propensity score matching, regression discontinuity designs, difference-in-difference, instrumental variables and cost-benefit analyses. Upon completing the module, students will be able to design an effective quasi-experimental impact evaluation, and understand how the results can influence public policy.

      " ["Inclusive Learning and Teaching for Disabled Learners"]=> string(482) "

      This is a specialist teacher education module for those working with disabled adults in the post-compulsory sector. The module aims to enable learners to provide inclusive teaching and learning for disabled learners. Learners will consider how to plan and deliver inclusive teaching and learning, how to work with others to promote the inclusion of disabled learners, and understand specialist areas of disability. Learners will also evaluate and improve their own practice.

      " ["Inclusive Pedagogy: Changing Practice through Action Research"]=> string(863) "This module explores teaching and learning for the development of inclusive practices through an engagement with practitioner research. A fundamental feature of inclusive education is an understanding of learning as a process in which the knowledge, experiences and interests of learners are an integral part. Learning is understood as embedded in schools cultures, values and attitudes. This is how the term inclusive pedagogy' is understood in the context of this module. Teaching diverse groups and being concerned about the learning experiences of all pupils and students is of crucial importance. The module introduces the concept and principles of Action Research with a particular focus on Participatory Action Research, and students are provided with the opportunity to plan a small project in relation to their own work context and interests.

      " ["Independent Study"]=> string(954) "

      This module allows participants to consider the work they may have done in a recent non-accredited CPD or to study something of their own interest. A series of ten activities supports participants in choosing and focusing engagement with an idea or concept. The module then moves on to think about each participant as a learner and what hinders learning, before returning to the investigation to support learners in finding their own readings in the field of study � the module team will also share some to start participants going.

      This module is taught fully online through our virtual learning environment (VLE) Moodle. Attendance for individual participants is measured through access to the material and activities, responses in forums and completion of tasks which are shared online via Keep In Touch (KIT) forums. Please contact the programme administrator for further details: ioe.aep@ucl.ac.uk" ["Independent Study (H-level)"]=> string(1027) "

      The Independent Study module provides a valuable opportunity for teachers, either individually or as a group, to constructively extend the work they are doing in their own professional contexts by engaging with appropriate literature in the field to critically reflect on their work, under the supervision of an Institute of Education tutor. This module is available at H or M levels and requires students to produce a piece of coursework in the field of recent CPD study. The students negotiate the topic of focus with their tutor on the module.

      The module aims to support an individual student or a group of students in producing a piece of coursework that meets the criteria published within the Advanced Educational Practice programme (at either level 6H or level 7 M). The module aims to provide a space for the student/s to reflect critically on their professional practice and development, through engaging with appropriate literature and research in the field and by producing a piece of written coursework. " ["Independent Study (M-level)"]=> string(1117) "

      The Independent Study module provides a valuable opportunity for education professionals, either individually or as a group, to constructively extend the work they are doing in their own professional contexts by engaging with appropriate literature in the field to critically reflect on their work, under the supervision of an Institute of Education tutor. This module is available at H or M levels and requires students to produce a piece of coursework in the field of recent CPD study. The students negotiate the topic of focus with their tutor on the module.

      The module aims to support an individual student or a group of students in producing a piece of coursework that meets the criteria published within the Advanced Educational Practice programme (at either level 6H or level 7M). The module aims to provide a space for the student/s to reflect critically on their professional practice and development, through engaging with appropriate literature and research in the field through written engagement with the literature review in an essay or portfolio of activities including their CPD activities. " ["Independent Study Module"]=> string(954) "

      This module allows participants to consider the work they may have done in a recent non-accredited CPD or to study something of their own interest. A series of ten activities supports participants in choosing and focusing engagement with an idea or concept. The module then moves on to think about each participant as a learner and what hinders learning, before returning to the investigation to support learners in finding their own readings in the field of study - the module team will also share some to start participants going.

      This module is taught fully online through our virtual learning environment (VLE) Moodle. Attendance for individual participants is measured through access to the material and activities, responses in forums and completion of tasks which are shared online via Keep In Touch (KIT) forums. Please contact the programme administrator for further details: ioe.aep@ucl.ac.uk

      " ["Independent Study Module - Leadership Development (Teach First)"]=> string(113) "This is a Leadership (Teach First) MA module. Please contact the administrator for further information.

      " ["Inequalities in the Life Course"]=> string(0) "" ["Innovation and Change in Higher Education"]=> string(1052) "

      This module examines the changing nature of higher education. It provides a critical introduction to key contemporary issues concerning current policy and practice. It is interdisciplinary, drawing on sociology, philosophy, history, economics, organisation and management studies. The module explores key contemporary national and global issues concerning current policy and practice within higher education such as access and widening participation, globalisation and internationalisation, changes in funding regime and the emergence of private providers, professionalism and professional education, quality, the Entrepreneurial University, and new technologies in higher education. It aims to engage students in critical reflections of the policy and practice of higher education, to explore change in relation to their own experiences and/or interests and to introduce a range of literature in the field.

      The sessions include lectures and discussions, and there are opportunities to draw on experiences from professional practice. 

      " ["Innovative Leadership of CPD"]=> string(483) "

      The role of the person who is responsible for professional development in a school is changing rapidly. This module offers a practical and interactive opportunity for participants to explore their understanding of the role and be clear about how to be more effective in supporting the professional development of all colleagues. The module is designed for new and more experienced CPD leaders in all phases who wish to develop further their vision and strategy for CPD.

      " ["Institutional Governance in Higher Education"]=> string(1108) "

      You may be able to choose this module as an external option on a number of IOE Masters programmes, but please note that prior experience is an entry requirement. Please check with the module administrator if you are unsure.

      The aim of this two-and-a-half day residential module is to introduce participants to the principles and practice of institutional governance and to consider them critically from a higher education perspective. Corporate governance issues have become increasingly important following well-publicised company failures. Higher education has undertaken large-scale reforms in corporate governance in the last few years, and the module will address this area in depth. But institutional governance is a wider theme and the module will examine evidence of changes in institutional governance and the roles of key players and structures. The range of issues and/or concepts covered includes: corporate governance in the public and private sectors; good governance practice and its effectiveness in higher education; and the role of governing bodies in strategy formulation.

      " ["International Development"]=> string(758) "

      This module will introduce students to the historical and institutional context and key ideas shaping theory, policy, and practice in international development. It will also introduce contemporary debates and real-world issues in international development including globalisation, economic development, trade, gender issues, global health, violence and conflict, drawing on work in economics, anthropology, social policy, and development studies.

      Students will explore the diversity, challenges, and critiques of international development in different regional contexts and settings, fostering an inclusive research and learning community through small group discussions, group work, and presentations, using selected case studies and examples.

      " ["International Comparisons in the Social Sciences"]=> string(536) "

      This module will teach students how to conduct quantitative cross-national comparisons in the social sciences. It will particularly focus upon datasets produced by the OECD, such as the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). Students will learn about why cross-national comparisons are interesting and important, the challenges and pitfalls that researchers face when comparing social science phenomena across countries, and how such comparisons can be conducted using standard statistical software (e.g. Stata).

      " ["International Perspectives on Education Reform: Curriculum and Assessment"]=> string(799) "

      This module facilitates academic debate about the aims of education and encourages a more questioning and critical stance on curriculum and assessment across international contexts. Students will be introduced to a range of international models of learning and associated pedagogies, assessment paradigms and epistemological assumptions.

      We will explore contemporary international models of curriculum planning and curriculum questions in order to extend your knowledge of contemporary international models of assessment planning and policy. By the end of the module, you will have developed critical understanding of socio-cultural and political influences on international curriculum and assessment and to apply this understanding to an analysis of contemporary curriculum/assessment.

      " ["International Comparisons of Educational Attainment"]=> string(596) "

      This module aims to teach students how to download and analysis complex quantitative cross-national datasets such as PISA, PIRLS and TIMSS. It will also motivate the need to conduct quantitative cross-national research, and the strength and limitations of this approach. In this module students will develop a systematic understanding, and a critical awareness of current issues surrounding international comparisons of attainment as well as a conceptual understanding that enables the students to evaluate critically current research in international comparisons in education.



      " ["International Perspectives on Accountability and Evaluation in Education"]=> string(542) "

      This module explores the aims of educational accountability and evaluation and encourages a questioning and critical stance across international contexts. The module will introduce a range of evaluation theories and explore the role of accountability and evaluation in organisational/system improvement. We will discuss the current evidence base on the relation between evaluation, accountability and organisational/system improvement and present an overview of international practices and how these have evolved over the past decades.

      " ["Internationalisation in Higher Education"]=> string(1065) "

      You may be able to choose this module as an external option on a number of UCL Institute of Education (IOE) Masters programmes, but please note that prior experience is an entry requirement. Please check with the module administrator if you are unsure.

      The aim of this two-and-a-half-day residential module is to consider what is meant by the 'internationalisation' of higher education, and its management implications. International students play a large, and often increasingly important, role in most UK higher education institutions, but 'internationalisation' goes much wider than that. In a globalising economy, with active international markets for academic staff and research, to what extent does it make sense to look upon higher education as an essentially national activity? How might such concerns relate to institutional strategies and plans? This module will also examine the roles of European institutions and policies in the changing landscape of higher education provision, and wider opportunities for institutional development.

      " ["Internet Cultures: Theory and Practice"]=> string(1149) "

      The ability to understand and work with blogs, social networking software, virtual worlds and other online spaces (sometimes gathered under the label "social media" or, not so much anymore, "web 2.0") is becoming a key issue for many professionals, from teachers, youth-workers and lecturers to a range of other occupations, such as journalism and media production. The participatory and social media spaces on the Internet provide rich areas of theoretical debate in areas of interest to students and academics in media, cultural studies education and new technology.

      This module will introduce you to theories of Internet culture through practical engagement with blogging and other online spaces and allow you to investigate critically the arguments around its role in formal and informal learning. By the end of the term we will have encountered and debated key emergent concepts and issues around web-based communication, interaction and digital media. We will be able to map these back on to our own development within our workplaces and courses of study and perhaps to our own curation of ourselves personally and professionally.

      " ["Introduction to Economics"]=> string(1122) "

      This module is a first year core course that prepares students for the second year, intermediate core module, 'Economics of Public Policy'. It is both an introduction to the economic way of thinking, as well as a basic microeconomic theory course. It demonstrates how market-level phenomena is built up from individual decisions of economic agents, discusses when market forces work and when they fail. All topics will be covered with a strong policy focus and no advanced mathematics will be used.

      The module aims to familiarize students with basic concepts and principles of economic thinking, and also to teach students a solid understanding of a basic modeling toolkit to analyse how simple versions of public policies (e.g. taxes, antitrust regulations or insurance policies) may affect economic outcomes. Students will also get a flavour of how microeconomics is used in public policy debates.

      The core audience of this module is students studying for their BSc degree in Social Sciences with Quantitative Methods, though interested UCL students from other areas are also welcome if space permits.

      " ["Introduction to Economics 1"]=> string(633) "

      This module is both an introduction to the economic way of thinking, as well as a basic microeconomics course. It demonstrates how market-level phenomena is built up from individual decisions of economic agents, discusses when market forces work and when they fail. It is a theoretical, model-based module but no advanced mathematics will be used. Instead, all topics will be covered with a strong policy focus. This module is targeted towards students studying for the broader 'BSc in Social Sciences with Quantitative Methods' and prepares students for the second year intermediate core module 'Economics of Public Policy'.

      " ["Introduction to Economics 2"]=> string(560) "

      This module is the continuation of 'Introduction to Economics I' so it is both an introduction to the economic way of thinking, as well as a basic micro and macroeconomics course. As is the previous, this is also a theoretical, model-based course with no advanced mathematics. All topics will be covered with a strong policy focus. This module is targeted towards students studying for the broader 'BSc in Social Sciences with Quantitative Methods' degree and prepares students for the second year, intermediate core module 'Economics of Public Policy'.

      " ["Introduction To Education Studies"]=> string(736) "

      This module offers a multi-disciplinary introduction to the field of education studies. The module starts from the students� own experiences in education by asking them to reflect on their own educational journeys and to work together to map the contours of the current educational systems. The module then takes a chronological approach to introducing students to diverse ideas about education that have developed over time (from Ancient Greece onwards) but continue to influence education in the 21st century. The module concludes with a series of interdisciplinary debates on some of the 'big questions' in education, in order for students to consider how various perspectives can be brought to bear on these key issues.

      " ["Longitudinal Data and Analysis"]=> string(1018) "

      This module is an introduction to longitudinal data and analysis methods for people who have some quantitative background or for those who want to brush up on these skills having not studied them for a while. It aims to familiarise students with: different longitudinal designs, available longitudinal data for secondary analysis, methodological issues of longitudinal research, handling missingness and attrition, and introduces students to different longitudinal analytic techniques comprising first difference models, fixed effect and random effect models, event history analysis, sequence analysis and structural equation modelling.

      Each session will be mirrored by a practical workshop seminar where students will put the analytical techniques introduced in the lectures to use. Students will learn how to analyse a large dataset using a statistical computer package (STATA) and are encouraged to develop good practice in presenting their ideas and developing their capacity for independent research.

      " ["Introduction to Psychology I: Cognition and Development"]=> string(1030) "

      Contemporary psychology is committed to the use of empirical methods of research and the development of theories that can be tested and refined through reflection on the results of empirical investigations. This module covers topics and issues in two branches of contemporary psychology: cognitive psychology and developmental psychology. Cognitive psychology aims to understand internal mental processes, and studies topics such as learning, memory, reasoning, and language. Developmental psychology seeks to understand how these aspects of cognition change during the lifespan and what influences these changes.

      The module is taught by active researchers in cognitive and developmental psychology. The topics covered in the module reflect their areas of expertise. Designed to be accessible to graduates with no prior study of psychology, students who take this module are expected to read primary sources of research, such as peer-reviewed journal articles, rather than rely on secondary sources such as textbooks.

      " ["Introduction to Psychology II: Individual, Social and Biological Psychology"]=> string(1027) "

      This module covers topics and issues related to Individual Differences, Social Psychology and Biological Psychology. Within psychology the study of Individual Differences focuses on in internal factors that make us unique or different from one another here we consider how personality and intelligence vary between individuals. Social Psychology considers how people act, think, and feel in the context of social environments. Topics include social influence, prejudice and attitudes. Finally Biological Psychology considers how human behaviours can be explained in biological terms. The lectures will provide a crash course in neuroscience and cognitive neuroscience.

      The module is taught by active researchers in cognitive and developmental psychology. The topics covered in the module reflect their areas of expertise. Designed to be accessible to graduates with no prior study of psychology, students who take this module are pointed towards primary sources of research, such as peer-reviewed journal articles.

      " ["Introduction to Public Economics"]=> string(1121) "

      This module is a first year core module that prepares students for the second year, intermediate core module, 'Economics of Public Policy'. It is both an introduction to the economic way of thinking, as well as a basic microeconomic theory course. It demonstrates how market-level phenomena is built up from individual decisions of economic agents, discusses when market forces work and when they fail. All topics will be covered with a strong policy focus and no advanced mathematics will be used.

      The module aims to familiarize students with basic concepts and principles of economic thinking, and also to teach students a solid understanding of a basic modeling toolkit to analyse how simple versions of public policies (e.g. taxes, antitrust regulations or insurance policies) may affect economic outcomes. Students will also get a flavor of how microeconomics is used in public policy debates.

      The core audience of this module is students studying for their BSc degree in Social Sciences with Quantitative Methods, though interested UCL students from other areas are also welcome if space permits.

      " ["Introduction to qualitative methods"]=> string(908) "

      This module introduces students to different approaches to qualitative research design, data collection/generation and analysis.

      Students will develop skills in computer aided qualitative analysis using NVIVO and undertake a small piece of qualitative analysis themselves. On completion of the module students should be able to demonstrate their ability to:

      • Understand how methods and theory are linked in qualitative research 
      • demonstrate an understanding of qualitative data interpretation, presentation and ethical awareness
      • apply different approaches to qualitative interviews and data collection/generation
      • exercise reflexivity and ability to interrogate the qualitative research process and findings
      • analyse qualitative data using the software NVIVO, and
      • critically appraise and demonstrate rigour in qualitative research.
      " ["Introduction to Regression Analysis"]=> string(1147) "

      This module is an introduction to regression analysis. It will be a pre-requisite for all advanced quantitative modules in Term 2.

      The module starts with an introduction to Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression and the assumption behind them and moves through topics on OLS violations, transforming variables, non-linear effects, dummy variables and interactions and finished with a range of limited dependent variable models.

      Each lecture will be mirrored by a practical workshop seminar where students will put the analytical techniques introduced in the lectures to use. Students will analyse a large datasets using a statistical computer package (STATA) and will be encouraged to develop good practice in presenting and interpreting the statistics they produce. By the end of the course students will be able to carry out an independent piece of research using regression techniques and will present this work in class. Students should also be able to analyse critically the use of statistics in social research and to feel comfortable with using different regression techniques to answer questions about social phenomena.

      " ["Introduction to Social Research (MA Education Route)"]=> string(1281) "

      This module is composed of a series of guided activities which will help you to learn about the theory and practice of research in a step-by-step way. Students are able to bring their own research-related interests to the module which can be explored in preparation for your dissertation. Students first familiarise themselves with their co-students and identify areas of common interest and expertise which they can explore further as they progress through the module. Individual and group activities enable students to examine some of the assumptions underlying different approaches to research, to identify a possible topic for a small-scale piece of research (such as that for a dissertation), and to consider what research design and which research methods might best meet their research-related needs. Guidance is provided on preparing the overarching research questions of a study, identifying which research designs and methods might best provide answers to those questions, exploring ethical issues, and structuring and preparing a research proposal for a small-scale study. Throughout the module, students are first invited to identify what they already know about research, to learn from key research texts and then to share their learning with their co-students.

      " ["Introduction to Social Research (online)"]=> string(1841) "

      This module is designed primarily for students who are new to research or who wish to develop further their understanding of research in preparation for their report or dissertation.

      Taught online, the module attracts a range of home, European and international students who, through a series of guided activities, learn about the theory and practice of research in a step-by-step way. Students are able to bring their own research-related interests to the module which can be explored in preparation for a report or dissertation.

      Students first familiarise themselves with their co-students and identify areas of common interest and expertise which they can explore further as they progress through the module. Individual and group activities enable students to examine some of the assumptions underlying different approaches to research, to identify a possible topic for a small-scale piece of research (such as that for a report or dissertation), and to consider what research design and which research methods might best meet their research-related needs. Guidance is provided on preparing the overarching research questions of a study, identifying which research designs and methods might best provide answers to those questions, exploring ethical issues, and structuring and preparing a research proposal for a small-scale study.

      Throughout the module, students are invited to identify what they already know about research, to learn from key research texts and then to share their learning with their co-students.

      Past students have focused on a range of research issues, from educational issues (such as promoting learning among blind and partially sighted students) to those focused on the interface of health and education (such as malaria-related education in resource-poor settings).

      " ["Introduction to Social Research Methods"]=> string(580) "

      This core year 1 module will provide you with an introduction to social science research. You will explore what it means to do research, how research projects are designed and how previous knowledge helps researchers create a framework for their scholarly work. The module will draw on approaches to research from sociology, psychology and anthropology so that you have a well-rounded understanding of research in different social science disciplines. In addition, this module will provide you with study skills that you can take forward for your personal and working life.

      " ["Introduction to Social Science Research"]=> string(580) "

      This core year 1 module will provide you with an introduction to social science research. You will explore what it means to do research, how research projects are designed and how previous knowledge helps researchers create a framework for their scholarly work. The module will draw on approaches to research from sociology, psychology and anthropology so that you have a well-rounded understanding of research in different social science disciplines. In addition, this module will provide you with study skills that you can take forward for your personal and working life.

      " ["Introduction to Sociology"]=> string(720) "

      This undergraduate module is designed to introduce students to sociological thought and to encourage them to use their sociological imagination to see how aspects of their everyday life are linked to ongoing process of social organisation and coordination. The themes covered in this module will highlight the interplay between the individual and society, how society is both stable and changing, the causes and consequences of social inequality, and the social construction of human life. Understanding sociology will make vivid to the student the social basis of everyday life and will also develop their critical thinking by revealing the social structures and processes that shape diverse forms of human life.

      " ["Investigating Research into Schooling, Curriculum, Teaching and Learning"]=> string(777) "

      Masters level studies culminate in the design, conduct and writing up of an original piece of research. This module is designed to introduce students to research theories and practices, and to support them in planning their own studies.

      The module will enable students to:

      • Develop the dispositions and understandings of a critical consumer of educational research.
      • Become acquainted with a range of approaches, designs and methods for investigating schools, curricula and classroom practice.
      • Understand the relationships between theory, question, object of study, analytic frame and method.
      • Design their own dissertation research programmes.
      • Acquire hands-on experience collecting and analysing data.
      " ["Issues and Debates in Religious Education"]=> string(613) "

      This module will provide a critical introduction to influential issues and debates within the field of religious education. It will question the place of religious education in a variety of social contexts. The influential role of faith communities on religious education in community schools, and the impact this might have on the curriculum, will be placed under critical scrutiny. This module will offer students the opportunity to reflect critically upon recent and significant curriculum and policy developments, and upon the implications of these for learning and teaching in religious education.

      " ["Issues in Educational Neuroscience"]=> string(941) "This is a core module for the MA/MSc in Educational Neuroscience, and is designed to provide a context for integrating material from developmental cognitive neuroscience and psychology of education. Topics covered include the underpinning philosophy and objectives of educational neuroscience, its application to literacy, numeracy, science education and socio-emotional development, and the potential of IT-based intervention strategies. There is an emphasis throughout on seminars alongside lectures in order to ensure robust discussions and exploration of the limitations and benefits of this new field. For those taking the programme, it will also involve presenting orally an outline of their dissertation research topics, so that these can benefit from similar scrutiny. Students from other programmes taking the module will make their presentation on a potential research project in order to receive comparable experience.

      " ["Issues in Museums and Galleries in Education"]=> string(920) "

      The module focuses upon participants' professional practice in education as a basis for examining the field of museum studies and developments in museum education, referred to as Museology. It introduces contemporary issues and practice in museum and gallery education and seeks to relate museum education theory to personal practice. Seminars introduce participants to reading and research in the field of museum studies and museum learning, and lectures introduce philosophical, historical, psychological and sociological dimensions of informal sites for education. The module examines the museum as an educational institution, the historical development of museum education, strategies for teaching and learning from material culture and the formation of museum collections and their diverse audiences. Using the British Museum Enlightenment Gallery, early issues in collection and education are debated. 

      " ["Issues of Concern in Education"]=> string(525) "

      This module critically examines issues of concern in education, with a particular focus on their significance on school-based pedagogic and curriculum matters. It is aimed at 'educational professionals' looking to deepen their understanding of key influences on making the curriculum work in contemporary classrooms. Thus, the module is designed to appeal to a range of professionals with an interest in schools including prospective and practising teachers, school managers, governors, advisors and teacher educators.

      " ["Language and Identity"]=> string(1477) "

      This module examines identity as a key concept in applied linguistics and considers the nature of the relationship between language and identity. The module is designed for second/foreign language teachers and educators working in diverse settings, including professionals working in foreign/second language classrooms and those supporting bilingual learners in mainstream education, as well as those wishing to gain specialised knowledge of second/foreign language education. It is designed to enable students to gain a better understanding of how language and identity is conceptualised in applied linguistics, the types of problems and issues that are addressed in language and identity studies, particularly those related to social justice, and how language and identity can inform professional practice.

      A range of identity dimensions, such as gender, sexuality, ethnicity, social class, life stage and culture, will be explored during the module. Students will examine approaches to language and identity research in a variety of second/foreign language education contexts and critically reflect on research methodology that involves the collection and analysis of spoken interaction and written texts. Connections will be made to personal experience and professional practice in second language education and second language policy throughout the module. In the final sessions, students will give poster presentations for their intended coursework projects.

      " ["Language at Work: Communication in Professional, Institutional and Cultural Contexts"]=> string(1232) "

      This module explores the instrumental role of language - how it works and how it is put to work - in different professional and cultural contexts. It is designed for anyone interested in how language is used to achieve different goals in the world of work. It will draw on key approaches to analysing different genres of spoken and written discourse to demonstrate how these can illuminate situations and interactions and sometimes even solve problems specific to different contexts of work. These contexts will cover different industries, such as business, law, healthcare, and education, as well as different types of communication, such as job applications and interviews, advertising and branding, public messaging, call-centre and digital interactions as well as informal conversations. Linguistic and discourse analytic approaches like narrative analysis, (intercultural) politeness, conversation analysis, multimodality, metaphor, and humour will be used to explore issues of culture, identity, authenticity and power at work.

      Students will be encouraged to draw on their own personal, professional and cultural backgrounds to discuss and evaluate communicative situations where language plays a crucial role.

      " ["Language Development"]=> string(712) "This module introduces participants to a range of theories (cognitive, linguistic and social) that attempt to explain the processes and mechanisms of language development. There will be ample opportunity to explore evidence from research regarding current debates and issues of controversy in the field of language development, including syntactic development, vocabulary acquisition and phonological development. The module also includes an applied strand about children who experience difficulties in developing language and communication skills. These sessions introduce speech, language and communication difficulties, language interventions and explore the relationship between spoken and written language. " ["Language Teacher Identity and Development"]=> string(1374) "This module examines identity as a key concept in applied linguistics and considers the nature of the relationship between language and identity. The module is designed for second/ foreign language teachers and educators working in diverse settings, including professionals working in foreign/ second language classrooms and those supporting bilingual learners in mainstream education, as well as those wishing to gain specialised knowledge of second/ foreign language education. It is designed to enable students to gain a better understanding of how language and identity is conceptualised in applied linguistics, the types of problems and issues that are addressed in language and identity studies, particularly those related to social justice, and how language and identity can inform professional practice.

      A range of identity dimensions, such as gender, sexuality, ethnicity, social class, life stage and culture, will be explored during the module. Students will examine approaches to language and identity research in a variety of second/ foreign language education contexts and critically reflect on research methodology that involves the collection and analysis of spoken interaction and written texts. Connections will be made to personal experience and professional practice in second language education and second language policy throughout the module. " ["Language, Culture and Learning (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1297) "

      This module enables students to develop their understanding of the cultures and histories of London school students and to engage with issues of culture, continuity and change in English classrooms. From the beginning of the module we focus on learning. We ask students to consider the diversity of pupils by asking the question "Who are the learners and what do they know?". The individual, social, cultural and linguistic diversity of pupils is a distinctive feature of London classrooms and how this diversity affects teaching and learning is central to the module. Along with a practical knowledge and understanding of English methods, the module offers theoretical perspectives on the role of language in learning, the teaching of literacies and literature, the principles of syllabus design and evaluation, and the assessment and recording of learners� progress. The work of this module is underpinned by social, cultural and historical theories of learning.

      Throughout the module, students are encouraged to reflect critically on their own experiences as learners and teachers, to engage with recent and relevant theories of learning and teaching as they relate to the field of English studies and critically and constructively engage with policy contexts and initiatives.

      " ["Language, Learning and Development (City University)"]=> string(119) "This module is offered by City University. Please contact Kim Reynolds for further information (k.reynolds@ioe.ac.uk)." ["Languages in a Wider Context (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(843) "

      Throughout this module, student teachers are encouraged to reflect critically on their own experiences as learners and teachers, to engage with recent and relevant theories of learning and teaching as they relate to the field of Languages and critically and constructively engage with policy contexts and initiatives.

      The module will enable student teachers to: develop understanding of issues and critical insight into professional Modern Foreign Languages (MFL) pedagogic practice; demonstrate the capacity to analyse MFL teaching and learning within immediate and wider professional contexts; refine professional knowledge through critical reflection and engagement with Foreign Language (FL) research and scholarship; analyse the values underpinning or influencing MFL pedagogic approaches, with a view to improving practice.

      " ["Leadership for the Learning Community"]=> string(1077) "

      The range of issues and concepts covered include the nature of effective learning both for individuals (adults and children) and organisations, the links between learning and the community and the place of education in its wider economic, political and social context. A key component of the module considers human resource management issues including the systematic planning, implementation and evaluation of recruitment and selection of staff and their induction, appraisal, reward, mentoring and development for improved performance within the workplace.

      Leaders need to motivate and inspire all who work within the organisation if improvement is to occur. Continuing professional development and the development of a learning community is also crucial. Finally, the module considers using research evidence and data as part of being a learning organisation and participants are invited to develop their research literacy. It is possible, on application, to complete this module by distance learning. Please contact the module tutor for information.

      " ["Leadership in Early Childhood Education"]=> string(477) "

      The module aims to develop a critical awareness of national and international policies in early childhood services. It explores meanings, theories and research relevant to effective leadership within policy and practice. Students will have the opportunity to critically examine and reflect on leadership practice within early years contexts.

      This module is equally relevant for current leaders in post, as well as those who aspire to be leaders in the future.

      " ["Leading and Managing Change and Improvement"]=> string(986) "

      The key topics of educational leadership and management will be considered from both theoretical and practical perspectives, examining the differences between these concepts as they apply in the field. There will be an introduction to the importance of moral, educational and transformational leadership. Learning-centred leadership and system leadership will be defined and its main features discussed. The cultural context is also examined along with organisational structure, culture and power. Key matters of managing educational improvement and change are examined and attention given to strategies for managing change effectively. If improvement takes place, measurement of that improvement is part of the process. An introduction to the field of school improvement and effectiveness research, policy and practice will be provided and the key concepts of internal and external evaluation defined and differentiated from related concepts like monitoring and assessment.

      " ["Leading in Diverse Cultures and Communities"]=> string(1015) "This module considers the contexts, purposes and practices of leadership within a global perspective. School leaders have always faced challenges, but the demands and pace of change have increased, as well as pressures and expectations. Globalisation can create unstable, insecure and very diverse communities of newcomers and present major challenges to school leaders. Cultural, class, ethnic and community diversity have many implications for schools. In this context, leadership is put to the test and school leaders often have to make speedy responses to highly charged events and find solutions which go beyond the pragmatic and require tolerance, sensitivity and emotional intelligence. Schools, particularly in urban contexts, face the toughest dilemmas, including having to meet the needs of disaffected students and their families. To support understanding of the issues, this module draws upon findings from recent and on-going studies which offer fresh insights into school leadership.

      " ["Leading Inquiry-based Professional Learning Communities"]=> string(568) "

      This module places emphasis on the leadership of professional learning communities within organisations and across the wider community. It provides participants with the opportunity to develop their leadership role by becoming more aware of the characteristics and process of professional learning communities. This module also provides an opportunity for practitioners to lead and engage in collaborative inquiry in a supported environment with the active engagement of children and their parents and with cooperation from colleagues and other professionals.

      " ["Leading Learning"]=> string(698) "

      The Leading Learning (LL) module is designed specifically for experienced teachers usually with more than three years of teaching. Students must be teaching in the UK for the duration of the module. Its aim is to enable innovative exploration of the complexity and challenges of leading learning in the 21st Century. Its threefold objectives are to develop participants' use of 'the narrative approach' as a professional learning strategy; to understand learning as a complex concept; and to deepen awareness of the potential of professional learning communities. It is run over the first two terms of the academic year with a mix of online discussions and three face-to-face (f2f) sessions.

      " ["Leading People for Effective Learning"]=> string(953) "This intensive two-day module for senior school leaders considers human resource management issues including the systematic planning, implementation and evaluation of recruitment and selection of staff and their induction, appraisal, reward, mentoring and development for improved performance within the workplace. Senior school leaders need to motivate and inspire all who work within the organisation if improvement is to occur. Senior school leaders' support for continuing professional development and the development of learning community is also crucial. The range of issues and concepts covered also include the nature of effective learning both for individuals (adults and children) and organisations, and the links between learning and the community. Finally, the module considers using research evidence and data as part of being a learning community or organisation and students are invited to develop their research literacy.

      " ["Leading Research and Development Within and across Schools"]=> string(1035) "

      This module is designed for educational leaders and teachers wishing to develop expertise as lead researchers and to inform school improvement through research and development.

      Topics to be covered to support you are: leadership capacity building within and across school learning communities for innovation and impact; current understandings about the area of innovation being prioritised; participatory approaches to conducting school-based research; logistic, structural and cultural issues in establishing school-based learning communities; data-driven school improvement practices and impact evaluation; ethical research and evidence-informed change in school and/or education policy.

      In undertaking this module you will be guided by the topics covered to lead a research and development project in a priority area of innovation and establish a school-based learning community within and/or across schools by proactively involving colleagues, pupils, their parents and other key stakeholders in your project.

      " ["Transforming the Geography Curriculum"]=> string(1116) "

      This module aims to engage students in deep, critical thought about curriculum development practice therefore, with a view to improving the quality of the geography curriculum experience for young people. The module provides students with a theoretical understanding of curriculum development in geographical education, the study of research methods within the field of geography education and will require students to integrate this theoretical knowledge and understanding with their own experiences and practices in schools and education. Thus, it is a practitioner-focused and research-focused module which requires participants to share their experiences and understanding with each other, as well as reflecting on theoretical ideas.

      This is the only module in the Education (Geography) MA which takes a specific emphasis on curriculum leadership. Reflecting a move within schools to see teachers as curriculum leaders, the module asks students to critically engage with the idea of subject leadership, and to question what this means in relation to how curriculum is written, read and enacted.

      " ["Learners, Learning and Teaching in the Context of Education for All"]=> string(719) "This module will look critically at current theories, policies, practice and approach to learning and teaching in the context of education for all (EFA). It will provide participants with an awareness of political, social, cultural and linguistic contexts in which teaching and learning take place. It will analyse challenges faced by governmental and non-governmental agencies in providing quality education for all. It will examine debates about planning and selection of knowledge, especially as related to teacher education and curriculum development systems in developing contexts. It will also consider different approaches to assessment of learning and consider the implications and effects on teaching. " ["Learning and Managing Educational Change and Improvement"]=> string(799) "Education leaders in health and social care carry a double burden'; leading and managing educational programmes in a rapidly changing global environment whilst working in collaboration with a range of health and social care delivery partners with their own finance and service-driven agendas. This creates tensions between education, training and service, tensions which are played out against a complex professional regulatory and policy backdrop. In such an environment, effective leadership is essential both to ensure effective learning, but also to provide a future workforce that is competent and safe. This module will aim to address these issues, and will address the needs of the growing number of clinicians in educational leadership positions who are attending the Institute.

      " ["Learning and Teaching for Adults"]=> string(877) "

      The basis of this module is an exploration of pedagogical issues which lie at the heart of the teaching and learning of adults. It is suitable for teachers, tutors, trainers and other staff working in further, higher, adult and professional education. Individual sessions will draw upon a range of theoretical perspectives including approaches to learning, knowledge and assessment, the relationship between organisational context, teaching and learning, the different teaching traditions in post-compulsory and professional education and notions of excellence and reflective practice.

      Responsibility for teaching and learning is shared between tutors and participants. During the final workshop, students will make short presentations based on applying perspectives gained from the module to their own teaching context. This module is available as a short course.

      " ["Learning and Teaching in Art and Design"]=> string(548) "

      This module offers you the opportunity to explore how learning and teaching in art, craft and design can be investigated through personal engagement in practical, studio-based research. Through a series of tutorials, visual presentations, seminars and workshops the dynamic relationship between art and design activity, pedagogy and curriculum development is made explicit. Assessment is based on a visual presentation and a written rationale. Previous experience of practical work in an area of art, design or curating is normally required.

      " ["Learning and Teaching in Business Education (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(890) "

      This module is designed to inform and enhance the professional practice of teaching at the point of entry into the profession by introducing students to the research base that underlies Business Education and fostering an enquiring, reflective and critical approach to teaching.

      The module focuses upon pedagogy in Business Education with students initially being required to write an essay on learning theory. In doing so, students are asked to hypothesis on how these educational arguments are important for the Business Education classroom. The remainder of the essay allows students to evaluate a teaching episode with reference to the educational theory that they had previously discussed. This allow the students to critically reflect upon their own practice and how their chosen educational theorist may develop their own teaching of business both now and in the future.

      " ["Learning and Working in International Contexts"]=> string(772) "

      This module is aimed at anyone who is learning and working in one of many contexts that could be referred to as 'international'. This could include working outside the UK on long term or short term contracts; working for an international organisation within the UK; working for or learning at a UK institution (such as an university); studying as an international student or studying abroad. The challenge for professionals working in a globalised world is to develop the skills and competences to learn and work in, as well as adapt to, these contexts.

      This module gives participants the opportunity to explore those different contexts in relation to relevant theory and case studies, and to reflect on the implications for their own professional experience.

      " ["Learning Geometry for Teaching: Widening (Mathematics Education Practitioners') Geometrical Horizons"]=> string(698) "This module has been designed so that participants shall become more fluent with geometric processes, understand better the connections between different areas of geometry, be familiar with geometric backgrounds and generally have a better 'feel' for the areas of geometry. The module provides opportunities for teachers to engage in mathematics, by developing their knowledge of geometry, their geometrical thinking and their understanding of the nature of geometry. It also provides opportunities for teachers to reflect on the teaching and learning of geometry, and to consider the nature of and influences on geometry curricula. This is a recommended module in the MA Mathematics Education. " ["Education and Identities: Citizenship, Rights, Narratives"]=> string(592) "

      This module explores tensions between citizenship and identities in both official and personal narratives drawing on educational literatures including history, citizenship and philosophy. It introduces and evaluates the implications of the principles enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) with respect to education, citizenship and identities.

      Topics include pedagogical strategies and policies intended to overcome barriers to participation such as racisms, sexism, homophobia and disabilities.

      " ["Learning, Teaching and Assessing History (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1419) "

      This module aims to develop your ability to plan, teach and evaluate a series of between four and six lessons that constitute an engaging enquiry into an aspect of the history curriculum in your placement school, with a focus on one of the key concepts of the History National Curriculum. The module includes consideration of the curriculum as it is presented within National Curriculum documentation and public exam specifications, and the importance of the key concepts that define the nature of the discipline and the ways in which these are interpreted and prioritised by schools. It examines the development of an enquiry-based pedagogy, both within history education and with reference to wider understandings of how children learn, in order to establish secure principles for effective lesson planning.

      The focus on pedagogy includes exploration of a wide range of teaching strategies with careful consideration of the diversity of young people and an appreciation of their perspectives, intended to support the creation of inclusive and productive classroom environments for all learners. Different conceptions of progression in relation to historical knowledge and understanding will be examined to establish criteria for evaluation and assessment of students� learning, with a strong emphasis on the use of formative assessment to inform interactive classroom decisions and future planning.

      " ["Learning, Teaching and Assessing Languages (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1039) "

      This module will enable student teachers to develop their understanding of the place of Languages in the school curriculum and their knowledge and understanding the aspects of Languages' teaching and learning. Throughout the module student teachers will be encouraged to reflect critically on their classroom experience and to draw on theoretical perspectives in the development of their thinking about the teaching and learning of languages.

      Student teachers will: develop their understanding of how learning is monitored in Modern Foreign Languages (MFL) lessons, both formally and informally; critically explore the use of formative assessment/Assessment for Learning (AfL) to promote learning in MFL; understand the implications of the assessment process on the planning and evaluation cycle; reflect critically on and articulate the approach to grammar in the National Curriculum for MFL and English; reflect on the different ways in which grammar is taught in English and MFL/Languages lessons and give reasons for this.

      " ["Learning, Teaching and Assessing Religious Education (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(741) "

      This module serves as a broad introduction to, and foundation for, teaching Religious Education (RE) across the secondary sector. You will be expected to build upon your research completed for your first module and consider how the theory impacts on practice in the RE classroom. Individual sessions focus on specific aspects of the RE curriculum, providing knowledge and understanding of the documentation (both statutory and non-statutory) which shape RE.

      Throughout the module, you will be encouraged to reflect on your own roles as learners and teachers, to engage with recent and relevant theories of learning and teaching as they relate to RE and critically and constructively engage with policy contexts and initiatives.

      " ["Learning, Teaching and Assessment in Citizenship"]=> string(780) "The module examines the distinctive qualities and conceptual underpinnings of Citizenship Education and the implications of these for teaching, learning, and assessment. It will introduce participants to key research findings in the field, including studies of the development of citizenship education. The module will explore developments in citizenship education and its role and status in contemporary education and reflect critically on the implications of theory, research and contemporary developments in the field for classroom practice. It will also equip participants to continue their studies beyond the MA by providing them with a conceptual basis for further work, an acquaintance with recent research in the field, and competence and confidence in academic study. " ["Lifelong Learning: Theories and Perspectives"]=> string(922) "The module is concerned with debates around national and international theories and perspectives of lifelong learning and their link to globalisation, different conceptions of learning and knowledge, different contexts for learning and knowledge creation, for example, educational institutions, workplaces etc, and different responses to lifelong learning. These issues are explored initially in terms of their economic, social, political and technological implications, before understanding is deepened by analysing a number of substantive issues, for example, access and participation and the role of the cultural institutions in facilitating lifelong learning. The module has been designed to meet the needs of anyone in a management, development (i.e. teaching, training, coaching, mentoring) or policy role in the private or public sector who is concerned with lifelong learning in all its different guises.
      " ["Literacies Across the Lifecourse"]=> string(1031) "

      This module will explore literacies, or literacy, across the life-course, examining reading and writing - and whatever else we may consider to be literacies beyond reading and writing - as lifelong and lifewide. We will examine theoretical approaches to conceptualising literacy and understanding its role in our lives, including, but not exclusively, education, work, faith, family and political life. In doing so, we will look at language history, language change, language variety, multilingualism, multimodality and digital literacies, considering ideas such as the dominance or invisibility of certain practices, the relationships between 'in-school' and 'out-of-school' literacies and social fears of 'illiteracy'. The ways in which reading and writing are conceptualised or defined determines their research, policy and teaching, which in turn influence conceptualisations.

      This module aims to examine this dynamic as part of understanding the powers, pleasures and perils of literacies across the life-course.

      " ["Literacy Development"]=> string(795) "

      The module aims to provide a systematic introduction to social factors and cognitive processes which shape reading and writing and the nature of literacy difficulties experienced by some learners.

      Students will develop skills to be able to read critically and to evaluate research in this field and understand the theoretical roots of current classroom practice. Focuses include the critical role played by oracy in literacy development; theoretical models and accounts of the processes underlying printed word recognition and production; the role of phonological awareness; factors in reading comprehension; complexity of the writing process and factors which impact it beyond grammar and spelling production; and an awareness of literacy difficulties and intervention approaches.

      " ["Literacy Practice in Writing and Comprehension"]=> string(755) "The module includes material from the fields of psychology, education and special needs. It focuses on aspects of literacy beyond the word level and considers the important relationship between oral and written language. It covers issues relating to the development of comprehension of written texts across a wide range of genres. Questions about the assessment and diagnosis of difficulties are also addressed. The module also covers the cognitive processes involved in the production of texts including the interaction between secretarial and compositional aspects of writing. The module aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the theoretical and practical issues in text production and comprehension and to relate this to current government policy. " ["Literacy Theories and Frameworks"]=> string(1110) "

      This module aims to enable participants to examine, apply and evaluate theoretical frameworks for the analysis of written and spoken English and theories of language and literacy learning. We will explore linguistic features of English which underpin the teaching of literacy, analysing these in the context of the historical development of the language and its current use, and will apply these understandings to literacy learning and teaching.

      Participants will be invited to compare and evaluate approaches derived from different bodies of linguistic and pedagogic theory, particularly around the teaching and learning of reading and writing. We will examine the impact of new technologies on literacy practices and the benefits and challenges of ICT based approaches to learning. An overarching theme of the module will be the teacher as co-researcher with adult learners. Participants will be asked to research a particular approach to reading or writing development and explore its theoretical underpinning. The aim is to create and maintain a stimulating and supportive learning community.

      " ["Literacy, Language and Communication"]=> string(435) "

      The purpose of the module is to introduce students to a range of disciplinary perspectives on learning-related literacy practices in formal and informal education settings, including digital environments. It aims to provide students with key ideas in studies of literacy and language that explore the potentials of contemporary forms of communication for learning and working in diverse linguistic, cultural and social contexts.

      " ["Living in a Schooled Society"]=> string(1033) "

      The purpose of this module is to provide the foundations for one of the central ideas that motivates the UCL BA in Education Studies: the idea that education has become one of the most important lenses for understanding the world around us today. The close study of education is essential not only for understanding the nature and significance of teaching and learning in schools, colleges and universities, but also for developing our awareness of how education shapes - and is shaped by - the entire rest of society, outside of the formal education system itself. Some scholars speak of the rise of a 'schooled society', in which all social practices and institutions are increasingly influenced by and structured around ideas, values and discourses about education, learning, schooling, development, knowledge and skill.

      The goal of this module is to help students develop their critical ability to recognise, reflect upon and analyse what it means to be living, as we all do today, in an ever more schooled society.

      " ["London Lab"]=> string(990) "

      This module takes London, a global, multicultural city as our lab for exploring social science theories and methods. The module engages with current social issues in the city, situating them historically and within wider national and global contexts. It considers what a focus on a particular city, in this case London, can contribute to the social sciences, and conversely considers how social science concepts and theories can contribute to a richer understanding of a particular place. This is not a 'London studies' module - although students will certainly learn more about the city they live and study in - but an introduction to theories, approaches and methods used by social scientists, using London as exemplar site.

      Indicative topics include: London as a global city; exclusion and conviviality; social mobility and immobility; neighbourhoods and diversity; segregation and gentrification; youth cultures in the city; markets and trading; households and family life.

      " ["Longitudinal Research and Analysis"]=> string(554) "This four day module consists of the two separate two day courses on longitudinal data and analysis and longitudinal modelling. Both are aimed at government social researchers and other analysts who want to know more about longitudinal research design, and how longitudinal data and research can be used to answer key policy questions. The second half of this four day module aims to provide the methodological and technical skills required to understand the role that longitudinal data can play in the analysis and evaluation of government policies. " ["Managing and Enhancing Work-based Learning"]=> string(691) "

      This new module is open to MA students as a module option, but is primarily designed for people in the private and public sector who are involved in work-based learning, running accredited programs, offering mentoring or coaching and/or are interested in other more informal types of learning. The assessment of the module is based upon a small-scale action research project in the workplace itself.

      You will receive support from staff that have extensive experience of facilitating and researching learning in the workplace who will prepare you to undertake the small-scale investigation of learning in the workplace, with opportunities to share your findings with others.

      " ["Managing Knowledge Exchange and Engagement in Higher Education"]=> string(1072) "

      You may be able to choose this module as an external option on a number of UCL Institute of Education (IOE) Masters programmes, but please note that prior experience is an entry requirement. Please check with the module administrator if you are unsure.

      This two-and-half day residential module examines critically the institutional management issues involved in knowledge exchange activities, covering higher education institutions' roles in economic regeneration, regional engagement, relations with business and industry, intellectual property, knowledge production and transfer, and related matters. Knowledge exchange and engagement activities raise significant strategic and financial issues for institutions: in relationship to mainstream teaching and research and how they are integrated into overall institutional strategies; how they are managed and on what financial basis; what risks they entail; and how they are reconciled with other concepts of higher education institutions' roles in society. These issues will be explored in this module.

      " ["Managing People in Higher Education Institutions"]=> string(891) "

      You may be able to choose this module as an external option on a number of UCL Institute of Education (IOE) Masters programmes, but please note that prior experience is an entry requirement. Please check with the module administrator if you are unsure.

      The aim of this two-and-a-half-day residential module is to examine the distinctive human resource dimensions of higher education management and to identify the particular issues that arise in this context. The module will compare approaches to HRM in the public and private sectors with approaches in higher education, and examine what is known about the motivations of both academic and administrative staff in higher education. How far are different approaches needed in a more diverse sector? Staff development and equal opportunities policies and practices will be examined, and the development of HR strategies.

      " ["Managing the Physical University: Space and Place in Higher Education"]=> string(1060) "

      You may be able to choose this module as an external option on a number of UCL Institute of Education (IOE) Masters programmes, but please note that prior experience is an entry requirement. Please check with the module administrator if you are unsure.

      The aim of this two-and-a-half-day residential module is to place the management of the higher education estate in its wider managerial context, and to identify the key challenges which this poses. Estate costs are the biggest element of most institutions' budgets, after staff costs. The character and location of the university buildings and campuses also have a significant, if largely unknown, impact on staff and student recruitment and morale and the educational effectiveness of the institution. On what principles might the physical university be planned, financed and managed? How can aesthetics of space and place be reconciled with economy and effectiveness in new building? How will changing patterns of teaching, learning and research affect the demand for, and nature of, space?

      " ["Managing the Student Experience"]=> string(1024) "

      You may be able to choose this module as an external option on a number of UCL Institute of Education (IOE) Masters programmes, but please note that prior experience is an entry requirement. Please check with the module administrator if you are unsure.

      The purpose of this two-and-a-half-day residential module is to examine the ways in which students use, and perceive, their time in higher education, and how managers can help to ensure that students' interaction with the institution is effective and worthwhile. The module will cover the student's entry to a new community and the adoption of a new role; how students can participate in and manage their learning; students' roles as members of a higher education community and as 'customers'; obtaining and using student feedback; disciplinary and appeals procedures; equity and diversity, including provision for international students; and the future student experience, considering how students might engage with their institutions and their staffs.

      " ["Marketing and Strategy"]=> string(1013) "

      This intensive module for senior school leaders considers marketing theory as it applies to schools. Participants are encouraged to undertake market research exercises in relation to an aspect of the situation of their own school. The marketing mix, in its different formulations, is covered and participants will be asked to consider how the implications apply to their own institutions.

      Strategic management and strategic planning and the implications for long term and futures thinking in education are also examined. Strategic management and planning are interrelated with marketing, and the module considers the planning/marketing cycle in the context of information gained through market research that relates to both the internal, and the local, national and international context of the school in the 21st century. Reference is also made to the literature and research on school choice, the factors that most influence the choices being made by prospective students and their parents.

      " ["Marketing in Higher Education"]=> string(1224) "

      You may be able to choose this module as an external option on a number of UCL Institute of Education (IOE) Masters programmes, but please note that prior experience is an entry requirement. Please check with the module administrator if you are unsure.

      This two-and-a-half day residential module aims to introduce participants to the principles of strategic marketing and their relevance to the management of higher education institutions. Marketing has become an important aspect of higher education management in a market orientated system. Marketing management, strategic marketing, competitive positioning and branding have been implicit management tools within higher education over many years, but their uses now need to be better understood. The range of issues and/or concepts to be covered includes: the principles of marketing in private and public sector organisations; the marketing needs of higher education institutions in respect of student recruitment, industry and the community; reputation and institutional image; the concept of the customer-led organisation and higher education; the identification of target markets; the creation of differential advantage; the overseas student market.

      " ["Material and Virtual Cultures: Transforming the Museum and Gallery Experience"]=> string(1052) "

      This module investigates the key role that new media technologies now play in the work of many artists and designers, in learning, and in the interpretation of art and artefacts in galleries, museums and other sites for learning. Both artists' work and museum and galleries provide a platform for critically considering the ways in which recent technological changes have influenced the reception and dissemination of material culture.

      The module is designed to open up the space for interdisciplinary discussions beyond the fields of art, design and museology. It embraces contemporary discussions around the authenticity of the object, taxonomies of the visual, the impact of technology on public and private spheres, the relationship between old and new media, interactivity, and use of technologies to develop new audiences and new ways of facilitating learning. It includes the in-depth study of immersive installations, video art, simulacra, avatars, video games, mobile and navigational technologies, podcasting, and digitisation.

      " ["Materials Development for Language Teaching"]=> string(834) "

      This module examines critically the theoretical orientations which underpin print and non-print language teaching materials designed for a range of contexts. It explores the processes of production and adaptation of materials.

      The circumstances in which materials design takes place and the criteria for the selection, creation and sequencing of texts and tasks are considered. There will be group and individual opportunities for evaluating, adapting and creating materials, and for discussing the process and products of these tasks. The aim is that participants should demonstrate a critical understanding of the key principles addressed during the module, and that these assessments should provide the foundations for materials evaluation, design and development in the participants' future professional lives.

      " ["Mathematical Education for Physical And Mathematical Sciences"]=> string(637) "

      'Mathematics education' is an umbrella term that encompasses all aspects of learning and teaching mathematics in schools and in other settings. This module is for undergraduates who are interested in how people learn mathematics and how to develop good approaches to teaching maths. It is a highly relevant module for those considering teaching as a career and would be particularly useful for those who are interested in Teach First. This module has been designed for undergraduates who are in their third or final year of their degree, but is open to second year students and also available as a module for part-time students.

      " ["Mathematics Curriculum in a Wider Context (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1030) "

      This module enables students to widen their educational studies and to engage with diversity in Mathematics classrooms in London schools. It addresses the place of Mathematics education within the wider experience of individuals and within the school curriculum as a whole, enabling students to reflect critically on the purposes of Mathematics education and its roles in society as well as on the practical implications for curriculum design. The module draws on the range and variety of the subject knowledge that students bring with them and enables students to reconfigure this knowledge in the context of their developing experience of teaching and learning in London secondary classrooms.

      Throughout the module, students are encouraged to reflect critically on their own experiences as learners and teachers, to engage with recent research and relevant theories of learning and teaching as they relate to the field of Mathematics and to engage critically and constructively with policy contexts and initiatives.

      " ["Mathematics for Teachers"]=> string(1651) "

      Mathematics for Teachers is a module accessible to all teachers of mathematics who want to deepen their subject knowledge in areas related to the school curriculum. Starting from your level of mathematics (GCSE, A-level or beyond) you will consider what it means to understand mathematics, to ask and answer questions and to struggle to 'see it'. The module outline is broadly divided into three main mathematical themes:

      • Physical 3 dimensional space, modelling the environment we live in
      • Axiomatic spaces including Euclidean geometry
      • From numbers in the environment to axiomatic reasoning with numbers

      We start by appreciating the mathematics that arises from physical space (location, shape and motion) then consider ways of thinking within abstract mathematical systems and the surprise of thinking beyond the familiar, and finally retracing this journey in the context of number. In each theme we start with mathematical tasks that are conceptually rich without needing technical fluency in order to engage participants and demonstrate the potential for sophisticated reasoning with fundamental mathematical objects.

      The module is suitable for:

      • Primary teachers wanting to gain a deeper understanding of mathematical problems
      • Primary mathematics co-ordinators who want to understand mathematics and science connections
      • Secondary teachers who want to be able to answer pupils' trickier questions
      • Secondary teachers preparing to teach mechanics
      • Any teacher with a love of mathematical problems and processes.
      " ["Mathematics, Curriculum and Pedagogy (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(960) "

      Practical matters such as the national curriculum, planning lessons, schemes of work and examination specifications are explored as well as aims of mathematics education. This module introduces key ideas in teaching mathematics with critical analysis of research and theory. It provides an opportunity for students develop an understanding of the value of research as well as the scope and limitations of theory. Students are encouraged to interrogate their own assumptions about teaching and learning and those of others through reflection and detailed analysis.

      Students will be expected to develop a deep, theoretically informed understanding of learning processes; a good foundation of knowledge of research in mathematics education; and to be able to apply their knowledge and understanding in their teaching. Learning is supported through workshops, lectures, seminars, tutorials; independent reading and research, and on school placements.

      " ["Media Production in Education"]=> string(576) "

      This module explores the theory and practice of meaning-making with digital media in schools with a specific emphasis on film-making and editing. You will analyse film language and practise creating audiovisual texts, working towards making your own short film in groups. Lectures introduce theories related to: film language and aesthetics; debates around popular culture, creativity and multimodality; the relationships between digital meaning-making and identity; teaching and learning with/about the moving image; and critical approaches to literacy and pedagogy.

      " ["Meeting the needs of the learner with multiple disabilities including visual impairment (MDVI)"]=> string(404) "

      Aims of the module

      • To provide students with an introduction to a range of physical neurological and sensory impairments
      • To enable students to develop appropriate teaching strategies
      • To encourage students to evaluate the multidisciplinary approach
      • To examine current patterns of provision from preschool to adulthood in an historical extent.

      " ["Methodology and Statistics"]=> string(228) "This module considers methods of psychological research and the analysis of data. It aims to enhance the ability to understand and use various research methods and develop expertise in running statistical analyses using SPSS. " ["Methods for Research Synthesis"]=> string(744) "Systematic research synthesis attempts to identify research reports on a given topic and to examine them in explicit and standard ways so as to produce accessible, reliable and useful summaries of research findings (these are sometimes called 'systematic reviews'). This module aims to explore key arguments about the purposes, methods and relevance of research synthesis. Students will examine a wide-range of different approaches in terms of both theory and practice, appraise actual examples of reviews from a variety of policy areas, and have hands-on experience of applying recognised methods at key review stages. This module is taught online, and requires participation in individual and group activities over a total of 13 weeks. " ["Methods of Investigation"]=> string(500) "This module introduces students to research strategy and research design. It enables the student to understand different research strategies and designs as well as to reflect on the choices that researchers have to make about strategy and design. The module includes online delivery of content and a 4-6 week research internship. By the end of the module students will be able to select appropriate research strategies and designs to consider these in relation to their selected research questions." ["Minorities, Migrants and Refugees in National Education Systems"]=> string(1188) "

      Maintaining the identity and stability of states with multi-ethnic and multilingual populations has been a major aim of national educational systems all over the world for at least the last hundred years. How this has been done, what models there are to choose from, and how education systems can be changed to meet the needs of minorities, migrants and refugees are some of the principal concerns of this module.

      This module's main focus is on how state education systems define and deal with 'the other' within the current political context across Europe, America and Asia. The main groups considered are national minorities, migrants, and refugees but other groups such as Roma, travellers and indigenous peoples will be discussed as well. The module has various aims: (1) to examine the origin of cultural diversity and its relation with nationalism and nation-building (2) to explore the range of policies adopted in different historical and geographical contexts to deal with such diversity and the response of minority groups to these policies (3) to assess the applicability of sociological theories on cultural diversity for education and multicultural schools.

      " ["Moving Image Production"]=> string(671) "

      This module, run in partnership with the British Film Institute (BFI), introduces students to the theory and practice of digital video production and in formal and informal settings of education.

      A portfolio of digital media will be assembled and a reflective commentary produced at the end of the module. It is suitable for teachers, lecturers, youth-workers and other professionals, as well as media students, who would like to engage with making and sharing media. It encourages participants to develop practical skills alongside theoretical discussion of how meaning is made with the moving image using digital video production tools and techniques.

      " ["Migration and Society"]=> string(982) "

      We live in an age of migration - in 2015 the United Nations reported that there were nearly 244 million international migrants worldwide and 65 million people who were forcibly displaced. What do these numbers signify globally? What are the drivers of international migration? How has migration been theorised in the broader social and psychological sciences? What is the difference between migrants and refugees?

      This module will address these and other questions by situating migration within broader social, historical and political contexts. In order to gain a comprehensive understanding of human mobility, this module conceives of migration as an intrinsic part of social change and globalisation instead of as a 'problem to be solved'. Drawing on empirical and theoretical work of scholars from both the global North and South, this module will consider some contradictions and continuities in the way migration has been understood in social science scholarship.

      " ["Mobile Media and Place"]=> string(475) "

      This module critically analyses the development, practices and implications of mobile media and their location-based features through the analytical lens of social theory, cultural theory, theories of mobile communication and media, and theories and politics of mobility. In doing so, it also raises a critical awareness to the current debates and new insights at the forefront of practices of mobile communication and media, and power and politics of digital mapping.

      " ["Multimodal Communication"]=> string(839) "

      The aim of this module is to move beyond language as the primary lens on the social world and explore ways of documenting and analysing how people use a range of distinctly different semiotic resources for representation and communication.

      Students will engage with relevant theoretical and methodological frameworks, and explore multimodal communication across different settings, including classrooms, workplaces and online spaces, using video and other visual data. This will make it possible to reflect on the potentialities and limitations of different modes, such as image, writing, gesture, speech, and gaze; the implications of changes in the semiotic landscape (e.g. the increase in the use of image) and, in doing so, consider the implications of multimodality for applied linguistics, TESOL, and education research.

      " ["Music Technology in Education"]=> string(1181) "

      The module provides a critical introduction to and development of specialist expertise in using music technology in six core areas of sound and its properties; basic audio processing; introduction to MIDI; digital audio basics; basic recording; and introduction to music sequencing. It will also address the dynamic relationship between research and practice in the field.

      As music technology is now integral to the preparation of teachers in Music, participants will critically review music technology through focus on the issues and challenges of creative applications of music technology to music education; engage with key literature and commentary in relation to specialist use of music technology, teaching and learning with technology in music, electro-acoustic and electronic music; and engage in reflective self analysis in relation to their own practice in teaching and learning with creative music technology through further study of applications and pathways for creative music technology; the future of music technology; issues, challenges and implications for music technology and music education; and creative and aesthetic issues in music technology.

      " ["New Directions in Education"]=> string(457) "

      Please note that this module is only available to students on the BA (Hons) Education Studies

      A core module for students on the BA in Education Studies, it will develop an informed understanding of a variety of views regarding the future of education, both formal and informal, through philosophical enquiry integrated with sociological and historical sensitivity to context, and in relation to new developments in psychology. " ["North-South Educational Partnerships"]=> string(749) "

      This online module aims to develop greater understanding of, and critical reflection on, the contribution of North-South educational partnerships to building a greater understanding of learning in a global society. It aims to provide educational practitioners with the skills to effectively engage in partnerships and to facilitate the value of mutual learning between practitioners around the world. The module includes the following themes as the basis for the activities:

      • immersion in partnerships
      • debates on partnerships: postcolonialism versus inter-cultural dialogue
      • reviewing examples of practice
      • preparing for and engaging in an educational partnership
      • reflections and evaluation.

      " ["Pedagogy, Adaptivity ind Technology"]=> string(693) "This module is designed for students who are keen to acquire an in-depth understanding of the design, implementation and evaluation of educational technologies through literature review, to gain first-hand experience in eliciting knowledge from experts and end-users, and to interact with peers in both disciplines of education and computer science. The aim of this module is to equip students with an understanding and skills related to: Learning theory and technology practice; Comparative uses of digital technology for learning; Learning design; Artificial Intelligence in Education; Design and Evaluation of educational technology and Artificial Intelligence as a methodology.

      " ["Personality and Individual Differences"]=> string(884) "

      This module examines human personality and individuality, along with its implications for all areas of human experience. Its focus is on how we are unique individuals but also connected to others. The personality section investigates the nature and structure of individual differences in personality, how these differences are assessed, and how they can be explained psychologically and biologically.

      The individual differences section will introduce students to current concepts in and research on individual differences in psychology. Material will include: 1) research methods and measurement of differences 2) structure and distribution of the traits we use to describe individuals 3) what is known about the cause of differences ('nature vs. nurture'), and 4) why we care about differences (i.e., the associated outcome variables and applications of this knowledge).

      " ["Personality and Social Psychology in Education"]=> string(761) "This module provides an opportunity to examine theoretical and research developments within the fields of personality and social psychology, with particular reference to their educational implications. The principal approaches to the study of personality will be considered: behaviourist, psychoanalytic, social cognitive and biological. In social psychology quantitative/experimental paradigms and, in particular, Bronfenbrenner's ecological paradigm will be drawn upon. Topics include: structural factors in attainment, process family-related and environmental influences on academic outcomes, values, aspirations, control beliefs, emotional and behavioural difficulties, prosocial and antisocial behaviour, self-image and academic achievement.

      " ["Perspectives and Contexts of Primary Education"]=> string(1054) "The module provides an opportunity for participants to examine the bases for contemporary primary practice and review critically recent developments in primary education. The ways in which theory and research in different disciplines (philosophical, historical, psychological and sociological) can inform and illuminate primary practice are discussed. UK and international perspectives and changes in primary education over time are considered. Session content includes an examination of the aims of primary education, systems and regulations governing primary education, the content of the curriculum, learning and teaching approaches, perspectives on education policy, relationships between home and school and futures for primary education in a global era. Throughout the programme, participants are encouraged to share and reflect on their varied experiences of primary education and to consider implications of session content for their professional practice. This module was formally known as The Perspectives and Contexts of Primary Education'." ["Perspectives on Adult Literacy, Language and Numeracy"]=> string(737) "

      The field of adult literacy, language and numeracy (ALLN) has risen to a position of prominence in the UK and worldwide as a result of a flurry of policy actions. One major outcome has been renewed attention on what English and mathematics mean in post-school contexts and how ALLN impact on national and local economies, businesses, communities, families and individual lives. The module will provide participants with the opportunity to explore ALLN as an academic field and as an area of rapidly expanding policy interest, and to support practical interventions. Through engagement with theories and concepts about ALLN, participants will develop critical awareness of specific issues within their own professional settings.

      " ["Philosophical Research in Education"]=> string(818) "

      This module aims to introduce students without an academic background in philosophy to the distinct nature and significance of philosophical work on educational issues. The focus will be on questions of philosophical method and how these can be distinguished from the methods of empirical enquiry.

      Students will be looking into the structure of philosophical arguments and the range of different ways in which philosophers construct and develop arguments, through a close reading of a selection of philosophical texts. The texts chosen will reflect central philosophical questions and concerns and will include both work by contemporary philosophers and classic texts from different philosophical traditions, with an emphasis on work that addresses educationally relevant concepts, questions and concerns.

      " ["Philosophy of Education: Knowledge, Mind and Understanding"]=> string(1422) "

      The nature of the human mind is a matter of permanent interest to all those concerned with education. Recent developments in neuroscience have prompted heightened debate on the subject between philosophers, psychologists and sociologists. Similar theoretical and practical complexities arise in relation to the nature of knowledge and understanding. All these matters invite and require philosophical illumination. The module will consider, from a philosophical perspective, major questions regarding the nature of mind, knowledge, understanding and their educational significance. In this process, it will open up presuppositions implicit in both education practice and research.

      The module will enable students to explore the presuppositions of epistemology and mind involved in a range of educational questions. This will involve consideration of perspectives on the Mind-World issue present in different models of learning (e.g. Information-processing, Piagetian, Vygotskian); the implications of these perspectives for learning, curriculum development and knowledge; different characterisations of concepts and concept formation; the impact of assumptions on practice and on the affective and motivational dimensions of learning.

      Although the module will approach the area of knowledge, mind and understanding from a philosophical perspective, it will include inter-disciplinary elements.

      " ["Philosophy of Education: Values, Aims and Society"]=> string(1127) "

      This module draws on work in ethics and political philosophy in order to provide an introduction to many of the major issues in philosophy of education.

      Specifically, we will explore philosophical aspects of the concepts of: freedom and equality; the perceived tension between these concepts in political philosophy; and the educational ideas associated with different ways of thinking about individual freedom, social justice and equality. These will be considered in relation to differing conceptions of ethics, and the divergent ideas of human being (the self and its relation to society) that these generate. We will also address the relevance of ideas and debates within these areas for current issues in educational policy and practice.

      Topics will include: social change and the advent of progressivism; arguments around progressivism and liberal education; liberalism and communitarianism; radical and libertarian traditions; the public/private distinction; privatization and marketisation; state control of education; faith schools and common schools; values education and education for citizenship.

      " ["Philosophy of Music and Music Education"]=> string(1246) "

      This module reflects upon the nature and value of music, musical experience, and music education, tracing central issues in the philosophy of music with reference to the writings of philosophers, musicians, critics and music educators. It begins with the introduction of 19th century thought in which the power of music to penetrate and move the 'inmost self' placed it at the apex of the arts.

      The question of whether music is to do primarily with the expression of feeling, or with the beautiful unfolding of pure form has been hotly debated, and a study of this debate will take us into the writing of critic Eduard Hanslick, philosophers Suzanne Langer and John Dewey, and musicologist Deryck Cooke. Students will have the opportunity to explore Javanese gamelan at the South Bank Centre before discussing the philosophical issues. The module will then move on to examine aesthetic questions in relation to the assessment of music and musical ability, and educational issues such as whether music can be understood as a form of knowledge. The philosophical exploration of musical value, meaning and experience will throughout the module inform and enrich the understanding of music educational aims, setting and transactions.

      " ["Philosophy of Religion"]=> string(569) "

      This module aims to advance students' knowledge and understanding of key topics in philosophy of religion. Students will develop their capacity to construct and critique philosophical arguments.

      The module will assist students in subjecting their religious beliefs and opinions to philosophical scrutiny and enable to draw upon their own critical engagement with topics within the philosophy of religion, to inform their own teaching. This module also aims to promote in-depth philosophical reflection on the aims and justification of religious education.

      " ["Planning for Education and Development"]=> string(919) "

      The module provides an international perspective on collaborative education planning, governance and administration within and between non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and inter-governmental organisations (IGOs, bi-lateral agencies), the private sector, and governments. It considers conflicting demands on education and ways to put new ideas into action, working from an examination of how decisions are made, to how they are implemented. Dilemmas regarding resource allocation and dealing with corruption and violence are explored. In two problem-based case studies at the end of the module, participants look at significant contemporary issues and possible education planning approaches.

      This module focuses on low and middle income countries only. Students should be aware of this before joining the module, and be able to bring experience / knowledge of low and middle income country contexts.

      " ["Policy and Politics in Education"]=> string(672) "

      This module is a compulsory module in the second year of the BA Education Studies programme, and it provides a detailed analysis of education policy and the underlying political trends. It covers major debates within education policy-making and considers how politicians have sought to change education systems through policy. This involves an examination of different policy areas and their relationship to the social and economic context of the time, using historical and sociological approaches. It also considers the formation of policy within an international context. The module examines a range of case studies looking at the enactment of policy in practice.

      " ["Political Sociology"]=> string(602) "

      This module explores the social bases of political partisanship and political participation in the UK and other societies. It explores the social bases for left-right political attitudes, and also the support for the far left or the far right. It studies the determinants of political participation, including turnout at elections as well as sit-ins, demonstrations and strikes.

      Other topics covered include nationalism and civil wars, and changes in social and political attitudes on a wide range of issues such as immigration, minority groups, and Inglehart's thesis of post-materialism.

      " ["Politics: from Power to Participation"]=> string(677) "

      This module takes you on a tour of the discipline of politics. It presents the varied and contested nature of the political realm, beginning with broad understandings that situate politics as a process and moving towards definitions which principally focus on the institutions of politics.

      Along the way, students will encounter a range of key political concepts including power, state, nation, democracy, and representation. These concepts will be illustrated by empirical examples from around the world and students will be encouraged to make connections between academic work and politics in everyday life. Join us for this interesting and intellectual journey.

      " ["Power, Conflict and Collective Action: The Sociology of Social Movements"]=> string(791) "

      Why do social movements emerge? How has the civil society mobilised and organised to contest power and pursue social justice? What is the role of collective action in shaping and changing politics and society?

      The module will offer students an introduction to key theoretical debates in the sociology of social movements, considering issues such as citizen rights, political protest and pre-figurative politics, emotion and embodied movements, art activism, populist and nationalist movements, violence, social justice and social change.

      The sessions will draw on a set of diverse historical and contemporary empirical illustrations from both the Global North and Global South, to critically evaluate the theories' relevance for the study of different types of movements.

      " ["Practical Research in Education (Business Education, Mathematics Education, Science Education)"]=> string(1119) "This is a core module for the MAs in Business Education and Science Education, and a recommended optional module for the MA Mathematics Education. Participants of the courses are taught together which provides for fruitful interchange of ideas. This module provides an introduction to a range of research methods and methodologies. Participants learn how to develop a research question applicable to their own contexts. They learn how to select appropriate methods and identify how relevant data are collected and analysed, how questions of the validity and reliability of data, and the ethics of research can be addressed. During the module participants start to formulate and gather data through a small research project. The module is suitable for participants involved in mathematics, business and science teaching in primary, secondary or tertiary education and for mathematics, business and science educators in other fields. The module is run jointly with staff from mathematics, business and science education.

      The modules for this programme will usually take place at 17:30 every Thursday

      " ["Practice-Based Enquiry"]=> string(316) "

      Towards the end of your programme of study, you will undertake a practice-based enquiry, which is written up as a report or dissertation. After the start of your engagement with the module, you will be allocated a supervisor, who will agree the focus of the project with you, and provide support and guidance.

      " ["Practice-based Research in Art and Design Education"]=> string(548) "

      This module offers you the opportunity to explore how learning and teaching in art, craft and design can be investigated through personal engagement in practical, studio-based research. Through a series of tutorials, visual presentations, seminars and workshops the dynamic relationship between art and design activity, pedagogy and curriculum development is made explicit. Assessment is based on a visual presentation and a written rationale. Previous experience of practical work in an area of art, design or curating is normally required.

      " ["Primary Mathematics Specialist Teaching 1"]=> string(2158) "

      This module is the one of two primary mathematics specialist teacher modules offered by the UCL Institute of Education (IOE). This module focuses mainly on mathematics subject knowledge and pedagogy.

      Module 2 is an optional extension of Module 1 and continues to look at subject knowledge and pedagogy but also turns more attention to developing schools and working with colleagues.

      Aims

      The overall aim of this module is to allow you to demonstrate:

      • a deep knowledge of mathematics from Foundation Stage up to Key Stage 3 (ages 3-14) that enables pupils' progression throughout the primary years
      • an understanding of approaches to assessing, reviewing and supporting children's learning in mathematics.

      Objectives

      By the end of the module you will demonstrate that you have:

      • developed your own understanding of mathematics
      • extended your understanding of progression in key concepts, language, notation and symbolism that support the learning of mathematics from Foundation Stage up to Key Stage 3
      • carried out sustained enquiry refining your own use of key mathematical processes involved in problem solving, reasoning and communication
      • reflected on the pedagogy of teaching mathematics and on the teaching approaches you may use and why.

      Summary of curriculum

      This module addresses:

      • the importance of subject knowledge
      • developing personal and professional knowledge of mathematics
      • developing an enquiry-based approach to teaching
      • considering and understanding learning processes
      • developing a considered rationale for choice of teaching approaches
      • using research to inform practice.

      HEI Session topics:
      • understanding additive reasoning
      • understanding multiplicative reasoning
      • counting and extending the number system
      • problem solving, reasoning and proof
      • reasoning about geometrical ideas
      " ["Primary Mathematics Specialist Teaching: Mathematics and Pedagogy"]=> string(1335) "

      The overall aim of this module is to allow the participant to demonstrate:

      • a deep knowledge of mathematics from Foundation Stage up to KS3 that enables Pupils' progression throughout the primary years
      • the ability to assess, review and support children's learning in mathematics in their own and their colleagues' classrooms.

      By the end of the module the participant will demonstrate that they have:

      • developed their own knowledge and understanding of aspects of mathematics relevant to the EYFS, primary and KS3 curriculum
      • extended their understanding of progression in key concepts, language, notation and symbolism that support the learning of mathematics from EYFS into KS3
      • Carried out sustained enquiry refining their own use of key mathematical processes involved in problem solving, reasoning and communication
      • reflected on the pedagogy of teaching mathematics and on the teaching approaches they use most and least frequently and why.
      Session topics:
      • Understanding additive reasoning.
      • Understanding multiplicative reasoning.
      • Problem solving, reasoning and proof.
      • Reasoning about geometrical ideas.
      • Understanding fractions.
      • Working with colleagues developing mathematical knowledge for teaching.

      " ["Primary Mathematics Specialist Teaching: Theory into Practice"]=> string(1216) "

      The overall aim of this module is to run alongside the other two modules and to allow the participant to demonstrate the ability to:

      • relate their developing understanding of mathematics and pedagogy to their own practice and that of their colleagues
      • assess, review and support children's learning in mathematics in their own and colleagues' classrooms.
      By the end of this module the participant will demonstrate that they have:
      • used their developing understanding of mathematics and pedagogy in their classroom and in their school more widely
      • reflected on approaches to teaching mathematics used in their school, in relation to current and recent research and developments
      • used their developing understanding of ways of working with colleagues to enhance mathematics teaching and learning in their school.
      Session topics (Year 1):
      • Representing mathematics.
      • Counting.
      • Geometry.
      • Introducing fractions.
      • Follow-up from a staff meeting.
      Session topics (Year 2)
      • Lesson study.
      • Maths talk.
      • Creativity.
      • Diagnostic assessment of mathematics.
      • Linking home with school.

      " ["Primary Mathematics Specialist Teaching: Whole School Issues"]=> string(1758) "

      The overall aim of this module is to build on the first year module to allow the participant to demonstrate:

      • a deep knowledge of mathematics from Foundation stage up to KS3, particularly in relation to algebraic reasoning, data handling and measures, that enables pupils' progression throughout the primary years
      • the ability to assess, review and support children's learning in mathematics in their own and their colleagues' classrooms and by leading whole school initiatives.
      By the end of the module the participant will demonstrate that they have:
      • continued to develop their own mathematical knowledge, skills and understanding, especially in relation to algebra, data handling and measures
      • extended their understanding of progression in key concepts, language notation and symbolism that support the learning of mathematics from EYFS into KS3
      • developed their understanding of problem solving and reasoning and their place in the teaching and learning of mathematics
      • reflected on the pedagogy of teaching mathematics and on the approaches used in your school, including an awareness of issues related to the place of language in mathematics, creative approaches to mathematics, assessment and links between home and school
      • developed their understanding of ways of working with colleagues,including identifying and starting to implement actions to enhance mathematics teaching and learning in their school.
      Session topics:
      • Language in the teaching and learning of mathematics.
      • Data handling.
      • Algebraic reasoning.
      • Working with colleagues on whole school issues.
      • Inclusion and mathematics.
      • Assessing mathematical learning.

      " ["Principles and Practices of Development Education"]=> string(967) "

      Development education is an approach to learning that leads to a greater understanding of global inequalities, including of why they exist and what can be done about them. It encourages learners of all ages to explore how global issues link in with their everyday lives. This online module aims to encourage a critical understanding of the key principles and practices of development education and related fields such as global learning and global citizenship. As a result of completing the module, students will have:

      • a greater understanding of the relationships between development and development education
      • developed skills to critically assess approaches to development education and global learning, and and relate them to their own perspectives and experiences
      • an increased appreciation of the cultures and social foundations of a range of practices in development education, global learning and global citizenship.

      " ["Principles, Frameworks and Context of Educational Evaluation and Inspection"]=> string(849) "

      This module aims to deepen participants' knowledge and understanding of the nature of inspection models and frameworks drawing upon the most recent research and writing about quality, quality assurance and evaluation approaches. It investigates the forms that inspection systems can take with reference to the complexity of cultural settings and educational (and other) contexts.

      The module promotes a reflective understanding of the underlying principles and nature of inspection and regulation. Its approach is to investigate inspection, regulation and evaluation models in an international, national, regional and institutional context. It will help develop critical and analytical skills in relation to evaluation and judgement, institutional improvement, consultancy and advice, the use of data and evidence, inspection and audit.

      " ["Professional Development Portfolio 1"]=> string(621) "

      The Professional Development Portfolio 1 (PDP1) module is supported by online resources and a small amount of tutorial face-to-face guidance. The module is designed specifically for teachers who want to gain some validation of their prior learning, and import those credits onto the MTeach. This module invites teachers to compile a portfolio composed of four key elements:

      • a philosophical statement about their teaching
      • a piece of reflective writing about their practice
      • three pieces of evidence, critically analysed
      • and a critique of an article or part of a book

      " ["Professional Development Portfolio 2"]=> string(745) "

      The Professional Development Portfolio 2 (PDP2) module is supported by face to face workshops over the academic year in which the portfolio is to be submitted for assessment. PDP2 is designed to bring together academic studies and professional practice through the compilation of a portfolio which invites critical reflection on learning experiences in other modules and day to day teaching. There are 4 components:

      • A Philosophical Statement.
      • A Review of the On-line learning in another MTeach module.
      • An Evidence Study involving work carried out in the teaching institution.
      • A critical appraisal of an article, chapter or aspect of a writer's work of significance to professional practice.

      " ["Professional Enquiry"]=> string(738) "

      The module will provide participants with an opportunity to develop their learning and their practice in their own professional contexts. Participants will engage in critical reflection and professional enquiry, exploring challenges and/or leading improvements in practice. Participants will be supported in deepening their theoretical and practical understandings of key issues relating to quality, expertise and professionalism within their own professional settings. The module will help participants to develop creative responses to these issues, synthesizing information and applying it innovatively to investigate an issue of their choice by designing and implementing a small-scale, systematic and professional enquiry.

      " ["Professional Issues and Curriculum in The Early Years"]=> string(552) "

      The module aims to;

      • Examine professional issues, curriculum and pedagogy in working with young children in the early years sector.
      • Consider recent research and government policy about service and setting provision for young children's learning.
      • To examine international perspectives and curriculum.
      • Enable students to use their practice to critically reflect on and develop their professional role of working with young children, parents, families and other professionals.


      " ["Professional Learning Portfolio"]=> string(0) "" ["Professional Practice"]=> string(0) "" ["Professional Practice Module"]=> string(877) "

      The Professional Practice Module incorporates both extended school placements and IOE-based teaching sessions.

      The taught element of the module includes a Professional Studies element and sessions in mathematics, english, science, computing and the foundation subjects all led by subject tutors. The module also includes two substantial blocks of teaching experience in two different school settings as well as a shorter two-week placement to broaden students� experience. This will usually be in a different educational setting such as a special needs school, a secondary school or a pupil referral unit.

      The module is assessed against the Teachers� Standards (DfE 2013), and through a broad base of evidence including students� teaching in school, school experience files, subject knowledge audits and successful completion of school-based tasks.

      " ["Professionalism and Expertise: Theories and Perspectives"]=> string(883) "

      The hallmark of outstanding individual and team performance is increasingly seen in literature on professionalism in the private and public sector as an issue of expertise. This module enables participants to explore the concept of expertise across public and private sectors, nationally and internationally and in a range of professional contexts. It does this by taking a range of perspectives, for example, Cultural Anthropology, Philosophy, Psychology and Sociology, to enable participants to engage in debates about the purpose of professional education, and its relationship to work. The module has been designed to provide professionals with responsibility for managing, delivering or supporting education and training with opportunities to develop their own analysis and practice in what is a constantly changing economic, social, technological and policy environment.

      " ["Promoting Health and Wellbeing: Planning, Practice and Participation"]=> string(998) "

      This module is for professionals and practitioners who are interested in promoting health and wellbeing through education in its broadest sense � whether working in local communities, schools or other settings, and whether with statutory services or voluntary, civil society, private organisations or social enterprises. Key topics addressed include: global health issues, understandings of health and wellbeing, the nature and practice of health promotion, participatory practice, understanding power, evidence informed practice, project planning, preparation of funding proposals.

      This is a core module for the MA Education, Health Promotion and International Development, but can be taken by all post-graduate students at the IOE. It can be studied by those from a range of backgrounds including education, counselling, health, social work, arts, community and social development, and related areas. You do not need to have a health or medical background to study this module.

      " ["Psychological Aspects of Counselling"]=> string(1294) "

      Recent years have seen a fresh interest in counselling in schools and other educational settings, in parallel with the wider demand for counselling services in modern society. This module aims to re-evaluate the key psychological perspectives and assumptions in such developments in terms of theory, practice and research. There will also be an in-depth exploration of selected counselling skills in reflective sessions.

      The topics covered will include:

      • competing theoretical perspectives: tensions between psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioural, and humanistic-phenomenological models
      • the trend for theoretical integration and technical eclecticism: the challenges and possibilities
      • current developments and issues in counselling within educational settings such as Mindfulness
      • special features of counselling children and young people such as DNA-V 3rd wave approaches to psychological flexibility, including references on children and teens with neuro-developmental conditions
      • multicultural/religious considerations in counselling
      • contributions of feminist, constructivist, systemic and narrative perspectives
      • issues of multiprofessional co-operation with special reference to the work of educational psychologists.

      " ["Psychological Research"]=> string(440) "Standard introduction to psychological research methods for the first year of study of an undergraduate Psychology degree. This module will cover principles of research design and quantitative and qualitative techniques for analysing data, study skills. Ethical considerations that need to be taken into account when conducting research will be covered. Students will be shown how to present data and report research studies.

      " ["Psychology and Neuroscience in Education"]=> string(421) "

      The aim is to build on prior coverage within the Psychology with Education BA/BSc to provide students with an understanding of a) the ways in which psychological and neuroscientific research has informed educational practice, especially within the UK b) how evidence-based approaches to practice might be extended in future, and c) the factors which affect the translation of research evidence into viable practice.

      " ["Psychology for Special Needs"]=> string(248) "The module aims to explore the relevance of psychological perspectives to special education in terms of how they are used to understand special educational processes and practices and how they influence ideas about the nature of special education." ["Psychology of Music and Music Education"]=> string(1107) "The psychology of music is concerned with how we sift through and organise music, both mentally and as a psycho-motor function. Enquiries have included theories about how people learn musical concepts and skills, and about how children develop musically. In this module these areas are critically examined and brought to bear on the aims and methods of music education. The module explores different psychological schools that have influenced musical enquiries, including the empirically-based musical aesthetics of the early 20th century; the development of musical ability tests from Seashore to Bentley and Wing; the impact of gestalt psychology on theories of musical perception and analysis; the cognitive psychology of music; and the recent emergence of the social psychology of music. The module will look at the processes of musical skill and knowledge acquisition, assessing the implications of such study for pedagogic strategy. Questions about how children develop musically, with an emphasis on the writings of Piaget and musical psychologists who followed him, will be explored in depth." ["Psychology Research Project"]=> string(934) "

      All students are required to submit a dissertation during their final year of this degree. This module enables you to build your psychological research skills in a range of psychological areas, and is a vital component of the course. You need to pass this module to gain Graduate Basis for Registration from the British Psychological Society.

      We will support you to develop your research question, design and implement a study, and analyse and interpret your findings before writing up your research as a psychological report. Developing a research question and conducting a project is a challenging but exciting prospect, resulting in numerous skills that will help you in your future careers, whether they are in psychology or an alternative discipline. As well as being supervised by an expert within the Department of Psychology and Human Development, you will also attend compulsory workshops across your third year.

      " ["Psychology: The Science of Behaviour 1"]=> string(684) "

      This module aims to introduce students to key areas in the field of psychology including cognitive, clinical and humanistic psychology as well as conceptual and historical issues in the field. You will learn about how the field developed, key models in the field and how psychological models can be applied to understand and solve real world problems by discussing the field of clinical psychology. This is a foundation module which will enable you to then build and further develop the depth and breadth of your knowledge and understanding of psychology. This module is compulsory for Psychology with Education BSc students and optional for Education Studies BA students only.

      " ["Psychology: The Science of Behaviour 2"]=> string(650) "

      This module aims to introduce students to key areas in the field of psychology including biological developmental and social psychology. You will learn about how psychologists conduct research in these areas, key models, theorists and theories across these areas of the field and how psychological models can be applied to understand and solve real world problems. This is a foundation module which will enable you to then build and further develop the depth and breadth of your knowledge and understanding of psychology. This module is compulsory for Psychology with Education BSc students and optional for Education Studies BA students only.

      " ["Psychology: The Science Of Behaviour"]=> string(389) "Standard introduction to psychology for the first year of study of an undergraduate Psychology degree. This module will provide coverage of some of the various subfields that comprise psychology. It will include lectures on topics such as historical perspectives in psychology, development, language, learning, memory, perception, personality, clinical and social psychology.

      " ["Public Health in Context"]=> string(1107) "

      This module will introduce students to public health, a discipline which seeks to prevent disease and promote the health of populations through the organised efforts of society. Public health addresses complex health and social problems that are influenced by social, cultural, political, global, environmental, organisational and economic factors.

      You will debate the definitions of public health, discovering its history, core functions, theories of change, and the range of essential services that can be provided. You will explore the value of theories of change such as transdisciplinary approaches and health systems thinking on the design, delivery and evaluation of public health services. In identifying the different methods of providing public health services to individuals, families, communities and societies, you will critically reflect on the implications of public health service delivery on health inequalities. These activities will help you develop practical skills and understanding of health needs assessment, epidemiology, disaster management, and community engagement.

      " ["Qualitative Data Analysis"]=> string(1384) "The module is designed for students with little or no initial knowledge and experience of qualitative analysis. It comprises a series of lecture/seminars and workshops led by the tutor, plus some complementary presentations/workshops by experienced researchers using a variety of styles of qualitative research and analysis. There is some flexibility in the programme and amendments are possible according to the interests of participants. The module will involve a consideration of a variety of strategies of qualitative analysis in order to develop an initial appreciation of the range of practices falling loosely under the umbrella of qualitative analysis: content analysis; ethnography; critical ethnography; pragmatic qualitative research; phenomenological analysis; systemic network analysis; discourse analysis; analysis of visual materials; policy documentary analysis; historical documentary analysis, etc. The module aims to introduce, present and examine the possibilities and problems of using information in the analytical process of constructing it into data in qualitative research for exploration, description and explanation of social and educational contexts and phenomena. It will consider opportunities and problems associated with research strategies which combine qualitative approaches with quantitative research techniques. " ["Qualitative Research Methods"]=> string(954) "

      This second year module builds on methods teaching in year 1 (e.g. Discovering Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methods), and consolidates students' skills and knowledge of qualitative research. The module will provide students with the ability to apply different approaches to data collection, generation and analysis.

      Through the module students will learn about interpretation and presentation of qualitative data. They will learn to exercise reflexivity, develop an ability to interrogate the research process and findings, and to critically appraise rigour in qualitative research. Topics covered include interviewing, ethnography, visual methods, narrative research, applied research, ethical challenges in research, and presentation of research insights. The module also introduces students to different approaches to the analysis of qualitative data including grounded theory and qualitative aided computer analysis with NVIVO.

      " ["Researching Education and Society: Qualitative Methods"]=> string(682) "

      The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the practices of a social science research community. The module design offers students the opportunity to learn about research by directly experiencing it and reflecting on their experiences. Students will:

      • undertake a group research project under the guidance of the lecturer and seminar leaders
      • learn about qualitative research methods and theories, and the advantages and disadvantages of these different methods
      • work collaboratively, exploring research questions exploring the teaching and learning practices on the BA in Education Studies
      • produce a tangible collective output.
      • " ["Quantitative Analysis 1"]=> string(875) "The first hour of each session will be held in a lecture room, followed by a 2-hour computer session. This module is for beginners in statistics. It provides a thorough grounding in the elementary process of data handling and an introduction to hypothesis testing and modelling of continuous data by regression. The following topics will be covered: - data presentation (using tables and charts); - summarising data (using statistics such as frequency, mean, variance, etc); - random sampling and sampling error; - hypothesis tests for continuous and categorical data; - modelling continuous data using simple linear regression; - multiple linear regression including categorical covariates and interaction effects. The package SPSS for Windows will be used, but no prior familiarity with this or any other computer packages will be assumed. " ["Quantitative Analysis 2"]=> string(268) "The first hour of each session will be held in a lecture room, followed by a 2-hour computer session. This module is for beginners in statistics. It provides a thorough grounding in the elementary process of data handling and an introduction to hypothesis.

        " ["Quantitative Analysis 3"]=> string(567) "

        You should have previously attended an introductory statistics module to the level implied by the Quantitative Analysis I module. This module covers models for both continuous and categorical response variables - multiple linear regression, binary logistic regression, multinomial logistic regression, ordinal logistic regression and log-linear modelling. As well as learning how to apply these methods in practice, the module will have a strong practical element with an emphasis on model interpretation. Familiarity with SPSS for Windows will be assumed.

        " ["Quantitative Data Analysis I"]=> string(993) "

        This module covers a range of advanced statistical methods. You will be introduced to more advanced modeling techniques. The main part of the module will cover multilevel models. The module also includes sessions on event history analysis and quantile models, with which you will gain familiarity and hands-on experience. Typically this will be managed by having both lectures and practical workshops in each session. Statistical software such as SPSS, MLwin and R will be used. A range of prepared data sets will be used, including large-scale surveys and longitudinal studies. You will achieve, as a minimum, a level of competence that enables you to use more advanced modeling techniques. You should be familiar with the following topics: basic statistical inference including confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; multiple linear regression including categorical variables and interaction effects; binary and multinomial logistic models ; model selection; SPSS for Windows.

        " ["Quantitative Research Methods"]=> string(1076) "

        The module aims to give students a solid understanding of the principles and practice of quantitative research methods. The emphasis is on the application of statistical models to large-scale datasets and the interpretation of the results. It builds on the first-year modules 'SOCS1001 Introduction to Social Science Research' and 'SOCS1005 Discovering Qualitative and Quantitative Methods'.

        During the first six weeks, the module introduces the principles and practice of data handling, a review of probability and statistics, comparison of two groups with t- and non-parametric tests, comparison of multiple groups with ANOVA/ANCOVA, and measures of association. The last four weeks treat the regression framework which is a generalization of the methods discussed in the first six weeks. Within the regression framework, the analysis of binary outcomes is also discussed (i.e. logistic regression). Through weekly tutorials, students gain hands-on experience with the data analysis software (SPSS) and of applying quantitative methods to real-world datasets.

        " ["Radical Education"]=> string(915) "

        This module will focus on the various traditions and forms of educational practice that fall under the broad heading 'radical education', from a philosophical and historical perspective. Students will be introduced to a range of educational experiments that challenge, in one way or another, mainstream forms of educational provision and practice. These will include anarchist and libertarian education, critical pedagogy, de-schooling and home schooling. The syllabus will include a range of theoretical resources, historical accounts, secondary literature and media presentations to enable the students to engage both with the practical lived experience of different forms of radical education, with the intellectual, political and philosophical ideas that inspired them, and with broad moral and political questions about the purposes of education and the relationship between education and social change.

        " ["Randomised Controlled Trails (RCTs) in the Social Sciences"]=> string(783) "

        This interdisciplinary module introduces students to Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) and their use in the social sciences. The module will emphasise the application of social science evaluation methods in the 'real world', and its potential impact upon government policy.

        Students will learn about key elements of the design and analysis of RCTs, and be able to critically evaluate their strengths and weaknesses. The module has a high practical element, with students regularly analysing data generated as part of their own RCTs, as well as having the opportunity to design and run their own. Upon completing the module, students will be able to design an effective RCT, analyse the data it generates, and understand how the results can influence public policy.

        " ["Randomised Controlled Trials in the Social Sciences"]=> string(779) "

        This interdisciplinary module introduces students to Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) and their use in the social sciences. The module will emphasise the application of social science evaluation methods in the 'real world', and its potential impact upon government policy. Students will learn about key elements of the design and analysis of RCTs, and be able to critically evaluate their strengths and weaknesses.

        The module has a high practical element, with students regularly analysing data generated as part of their own RCTs, as well as having the opportunity to design and run their own. Upon completing the module, students will be able to design an effective RCT, analyse the data it generates, and understand how the results can influence public policy.

        " ["Reading and Spelling Difficulties"]=> string(705) "The module includes material from the fields of psychology, primary education and special needs, and deals with an important aspect of educational development. It has been designed to follow the 'Literacy Development' module, and although it is not necessary to have taken this module previously, students will be expected to undertake some specified pre-reading. The module covers: classification of specific learning difficulties; a review of different theoretical perspectives in the nature and origin of difficulties in developmental literacy skills; methods of assessment and intervention suitable for primary and secondary school pupils and ways of evaluating the efficiency of such interventions. " ["Reading Research In Education"]=> string(800) "

        The module explores why research is important in education, and in particular why teachers need to be able to read research.

        This module was specifically designed for students on the MA in Geography Education programme who are in their NQT year, but is now opened to other students in GEMS Cluster (Geography, Enterprise, Mathematics and Science). Students are taken through the important dimensions of reading research such as understanding methodologies and learning to read research critically and explaining the relevance to practice.

        By the end of this module, participants will have engaged with research in a variety of fields and be familiar with a range of research methods used in education. The coursework is to write a literature review on a relevant topic of interest. " ["Religion in the Modern World: Social Scientific Perspectives"]=> string(827) "

        After a long period during which religion seemed to be of only marginal interest to scholars and policy-makers, the field is undergoing a renaissance. Religion has a central role in both international conflicts and domestic social divisions.

        The social scientific study of religion is concerned with individual identities, beliefs and behaviour on the one hand and norms and institutions on the other, and with their reciprocal influences. It aims to describe and explain religion in society through empirical investigation and testable theory. Religion and belief lends itself well to interdisciplinary study. To understand the place of religion in the modern world, it helps to use all of the tools of psychology, evolutionary science, anthropology, sociology, geography, politics, economics and social policy.

        " ["Religious Education - Issues and Debates in Religious Education"]=> string(548) "

        Public debates about the wearing of religious symbols, head coverings, for example, have highlighted the controversial nature of religion in public life. Of particular concern to educators are the religious and moral issues affecting children and young people in school. Should creationism, for example, be taught in schools? Why are all schools required to have a daily act of worship by law and should this practice continue? Are faith schools desirable in a modern liberal democratic country like England or socially divisive?



        " ["Representations of Education in Film and Literature"]=> string(626) "

        This module provides a general introduction to the foundations of education through film and literature. A number of films and some related literature are used to prompt us to think of ways in which educational relationships become the material for art and for entertainment. These also help us to consider the consequences of the way in which images of the teacher, students, the curriculum and academic institutions are presented on film. This is a means of considering both the relationship between representation and reality, and the way in which understandings of reality are affected by fictional or media images.

        " ["Research and Practice Based Enquiry (RPBE) Leading to a Dissertation"]=> string(0) "" ["Research and Practice Based Enquiry (RPBE) Leading to a Report"]=> string(0) "" ["Research and Practice-Based Enquiry"]=> string(504) "

        The Research and Practice-Based Enquiry (RPBE) module begins with participants working together to construct an understanding of the relationship between research and their professional practice. This then moves on to a small-scale, practitioner-based classroom research and that explores in depth a question that arise out of their school or classroom experience. At the heart of this module is a focus on practice and the benefits of using research to explore, reflect on and improve practice.

        " ["Research and Professional Practice"]=> string(466) "

        The Research and Professional Practice (RPP) module provides participants with the opportunity to examine the relationship between research and professional practice, the nature of 'evidence' and what it means to be 'research literate'. Assessment is made up of two parts: a reflection on 'What is the relationship between research and professional practice?' and a proposal for a small-scale practice-based enquiry that will support professional development.

        " ["Research Design and Methodology"]=> string(217) "

        This module aims to enable participants to acquire a critical understanding of research design and methodology and to be constructively critical about research issues relevant to the field of special education.

        " ["Research Engagement, Participation and Impact"]=> string(845) "

        The module aims to introduce students to diverse rationales and critiques relating to the involvement of the public and other stakeholders in the oversight, design, conduct and interpretation of research. Participants will also study strategies aimed at helping researchers and stakeholders work effectively together on initiatives that result in or make use of research findings so as to inform policy, practice and individual decision-making. Students attend with an interest in a range of public policy sectors and disciplines.

        Students participate in workshops in a classroom at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) or at a distance via Moodle our virtual learning environment. Workshops will be recorded and made available on Moodle. All students will be expected to engage in additional individual and group activities online.

        " ["Research in Media, Cultural Studies and Education"]=> string(2032) "This is a non-assessed module which introduces participants to key empirical studies which have influenced theories and methodologies in the field of media, cultural studies and communication. The module is available all year and supports participants as part of their supervision for the compulsory Reports/Dissertations part of the MA in Media, Culture and Communication (PMM9_MCC9IM). Given the research led nature of the degree, the module will provide participants with an overview of methods and analyses used by media and cultural studies researchers in the field of education and learning. Reading of original source texts of key studies will provide participants with an understanding of the development and debates within the field. This overview will ensure coherence across the module and provide a base from which to expand, develop and apply research methods and analyses in other modules. It provides a critical overview of research within the interdisciplinary fields of media, cultural studies and education. The aim is to provide a background in the methods and analyses which will be applied and developed in different areas throughout the module. It will cover the following areas: ethnography, audience research, discourse analysis, semiotic analysis, observational research and quantitative research. Media and cultural studies have a long research tradition upon which we will draw. The link between cultural studies and education will be made by considering research in areas such as school cultures, home-school relations, power structures, diversity, educational discourse and informal learning. The module will give participants experience of reading original source materials and debating questions raised by studies in the field. It will also prepare participants to do their own research as part of the module. Online components will include conferences related to the readings, and discussion groups connected with each study. This module is offered throughout the year as a resource.

        " ["Research Methods"]=> string(749) "The aim of this module is to introduce students to a variety of approaches used in educational research into English in Education in order to develop skills for reviewing and analysing existing research and designing, conducting and reporting students' own research. The module will introduce students to appropriate methods used in researching English in Education; develop students' ability to review and analyse existing research; develop students' ability to formulate a research plan, collect and analyse data and critically reflect on the research process; introduce students to a range of methods used in educational research. Students will be required to consider ethical issues and processes of approval relating to research.

        " ["Research Methods and Statistics"]=> string(787) "

        Building on the content of Psychological Research taken in Year 1, this module offers a more in-depth exploration of methodology and data analysis for meaningful inquiry and research in the fields of psychology and education. A range of key methods and analysis approaches in both qualitative and quantitative domains are discussed and critiqued. An emphasis is also placed on preparing students to carry out an independent research project in Year 3 of the BSc Psychology with Education.

        The module utilises a combination of teaching methods including lectures, small group discussions and activities and computer-based exercises. Students are expected to play an active part during the sessions, do preparatory reading as recommended, and complete the computing exercises.

        " ["Research Methods In Education"]=> string(587) "

        This module takes an inter-disciplinary approach to understanding how we come to understand the world examining philosophical, historical and sociological approaches to research. The module will support students to more critically engage with academic research papers and the concept of what is evidence' within education research.

        The module will also develop students' skills and understandings of undertaking independent research - to support their preparation for their third year dissertations but also for potential postgraduate research or in their future employment.

        " ["Research Methods in Literacy"]=> string(566) "

        In this module participants will be introduced to issues in research methodology and statistics within the context of research on the development of literacy. There will be coverage of the main issues in research design including both quantitative and qualitative approaches.

        This module aims to provide participants with the skills to evaluate critically research findings in the assessment of and intervention in reading and writing. The module will also provide the foundation to enable participants to design and carry out their own investigations.

        " ["Research Methods in Literacy and Literary Development"]=> string(588) "In this module participants will be introduced to issues in research methodology and statistics within the context of research on the development of literacy. There will be coverage of the main issues in research design including both quantitative and qualitative approaches. This module aims to provide participants with the skills to evaluate critically research findings in the assessment of and intervention in reading and writing. This module will also provide the foundation to enable participants to design and carry out their own investigations. " ["Researching Second Language Learning"]=> string(801) "

        This module is designed to provide participants with knowledge and understanding of theoretical foundations, processes and practices of educational and social research, and to enable them to apply this to their own critical evaluation, design and conduct of research in areas relevant to TESOL. The aims are to:

        • Enable participants to understand and evaluate research in TESOL and related areas.
        • Consider key issues in research design and field work.
        • Expose students to a range of methods for data collection.
        • Explore approaches to qualitative and quantitative data analysis and the possibility of combining methods.
        • Assist participants in the development of coherent and informed research proposals grounded in a particular educational context.

        " ["Researching Childhood"]=> string(895) "

        This module introduces students to current social research about children and childhood and enables participants to develop a sound understanding of general methodology and research methods as a basis for the critical appraisal of childhood research. You will:

        • Consider ethical and methodological issues in researching childhood and children's lives
        • Learn about cutting edge childhood research from internationally renowned and research-active lecturers
        • Explore a range of contemporary directions and debates in childhood research including: creative and participatory methods; power relations in social research; voice and perspective; children's rights based approaches to research; ethics in research with 'vulnerable' groups
        • Begin to design your own piece of independent social research on childhood under the tutelage of expert module tutors.
        " ["Researching Childhood*"]=> string(897) "

        This module introduces students to current social research about children and childhood and enables participants to develop a sound understanding of general methodology and research methods as a basis for the critical appraisal of childhood research. You will:

        • Consider ethical and methodological issues in researching childhood and children's lives
        • Learn about cutting edge childhood research from internationally renowned and research-active lecturers
        • Explore a range of contemporary directions and debates in childhood research including: creative and participatory methods; power relations in social research; voice and perspective; children�s rights based approaches to research; ethics in research with 'vulnerable' groups
        • Begin to design your own piece of independent social research on childhood under the tutelage of expert module tutors.

        " ["Researching Digital Learning"]=> string(663) "

        The aim of this module is to introduce students to a variety of approaches used in educational research in order to develop skills for:

        1. critically reviewing and analysing existing research
        2. designing, conducting and analysing research, and
        3. considering ethical issues that arise in educational research contexts.

        The module explores a range of methodological approaches and methods used in educational research, critically examining their strengths and weaknesses. It includes a number of research-oriented tasks and exercises, where students can use specific examples for research related to their own interests. 

        " ["Researching Early Years Education"]=> string(632) "

        Students following this module will design and conduct their own small-scale research project, demonstrating a sound understanding of methodology, research methods, and ethics in relation to their work. Content focuses on the development of research skills in investigating some aspect of provision for children, or of children's lives. This will enable an understanding of methodology, including the collection, presentation and evaluation of data. 

        Ultimately this module will lead to the development of the student as a researcher and the ability to relate their own study to an existing field of evidence.

        " ["Researching Early Years and Primary Education"]=> string(647) "

        This module offers an introduction to the importance of high-quality educational research, enabling students both to evaluate and critique published research studies, and to design and implement a small-scale study of their own. It proceeds by means of a detailed consideration, week by week, of a recent study in the field of early childhood and primary education, and an analysis of the design, methods and interpretation the study has employed. By these means, participants are enabled to experiment with different research approaches and methods, and to explore the ethical aspects of research, especially research with young children.

        " ["Responsive Museums: Inclusion and Outreach in Practice"]=> string(501) "

        This module focuses on smaller and medium sized museums and galleries, onsite and offsite, and at archives. The emphasis is on informal learning, outreach and community work, and at audiences such as tourists and lifelong learners. It looks at varieties of providers including volunteers and broadly at diversity. The Museum of London and the Metropolitan Archives are two of the case studies. The focus of the coursework is on how to secure funding for museum learning projects and programmes.

        " ["Rights and Education"]=> string(636) "This module aims to introduce participants to a range of human rights issues in education. The module begins by exploring the origins of international human rights, and developing a critical analytical understanding of theories and perspectives on contemporary human rights discourse and politics. This is followed by a consideration of the right to education and approaches to equity in the context of globalisation. The second part of the module focuses on a critical examination of educational policy contexts with regard to rights, equity and discrimination, focusing on class, gender, race, disability and sexuality.

        " ["Rights, Equality and Justice in Education"]=> string(1208) "

        The overall aim of this module is to explore conceptions of rights, equality and justice in education, and to consider how these concepts apply to a range of issues and arguments in education, including state and private education, equality of opportunity, compensating for inequality, the politics of recognition, the distinction between public and private spheres, multiculturalism, faith schools and student led-curricula.

        The module begins with an examination of competing conceptions of rights. We will examine the right to education, vouchers and school choice, autonomy-facilitating education, compulsory education, religious schools and multicultural education, feminist conceptions of rights, and the distinction between the private and public spheres. In the second half of the module we look at equality and social justice, examine competing conceptions of equality and justice, explore how these apply to education and citizenship, explore a series of feminist arguments that emphasise the 'politics of recognition', consider how this is distinguished from the 'politics of redistribution' and finish by taking a look at a number of arguments directed against equality in education.

        " ["School Effectiveness and School Improvement"]=> string(661) "This module critically examines school effectiveness from national and international perspectives, with an emphasis on analysis of research and discussion of theoretical, conceptual and measurement issues. The module will explore values, equity, and the influence of context, the consistency of school effects and ineffectiveness in school effectiveness literature as well as examining the value of the research in international contexts. Participants are encouraged to consider the literature and research in the light of their own experiences and context. The implications for school improvement practice will also be explored. " ["Science Education in the Broader Context (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1119) "

        This module serves to broaden students understanding of science teaching. It focuses on learning about science and looks at the nature of science, its moral and ethical dimensions and its place in a cultural context. Through a chosen context or "big idea" students have the opportunity to critically evaluate continuity and progression in their specialist area and also to consider and critically reflect upon how learners learn science. Both traditional and emerging theories about learning are considered and are related to ideas of continuity and progression, including what may be observed in school and during teaching placements.

        In discussion with teachers and students at school and through relevant literature, this assignment encourages a critical reflection on the English science curriculum and its interpretation in classrooms from primary to post-16. Student teachers are encouraged to explore the importance and challenge of learning the key "big idea" through consideration of alternative perceptions and the appropriateness of the curriculum to develop learners� ideas about science.

        " ["Second Language Acquisition"]=> string(737) "The aim of this module is to provide a general introduction to theories and approaches in second language acquisition. Various theoretical and empirical issues in the field are discussed together with learner-internal and learner-external factors that influence the course of second language development. In particular, the module provides students with an understanding of cognitive-interactionist and frequency-based perspectives of SLA; and the roles of learner factors such as age, first language, and individual difference variables. The module also explores how SLA theory and research may be applied to aspects of second language teaching, and how the use of technology may facilitate second language learning processes.

        " ["Secondary Geography: Developing Teaching and Learning (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1133) "

        This module aims to develop your ability to plan, teach and critically evaluate your geography teaching and the geographical learning of your pupils. This will help you to:

        1. develop a clear and justifiable geographical and educational rationale for your teaching
        2. plan sequences of lessons which link together and progress coherently
        3. analyse learning outcomes closely, using the evidence of pupils� work to draw conclusions about the geographical learning.
        You will develop a clear rationale for the geography (i.e. why you are teaching this), plan the lessons, teach them and then carefully analyse the geography learning outcomes using students� work as evidence. You will draw on academic literature throughout your planning of the sequence (particularly to underpin your rationale) and in your analysis of the outcomes, integrating this into your writing. As far as is practical, the planning of the lesson sequence and the design of appropriate resources will be your own original work, although you may draw on existing departmental schemes and resources as a starting point.

        " ["Secondary Geography: Learning in a Wider Context (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1227) "

        The aims of this module are to:

        • expand your knowledge of educational theory and practice by focusing on one wider aspect of education (see topics below)
        • consider geography�s role within this broader dimension of education
        Your assignment will focus on one of the following topics:

        1. Fieldwork
        2. Technology/GIS/Spatial Thinking
        3. Assessment & Progression
        4. Values and the Curriculum
        5. Homework
        6. Literacy/Numeracy
        7. Differentiation/Special Educational Needs/English as an Additional Language
        8. Contemporary Issues/Current Affairs in Education
        For the chosen topic, students must identify a question to investigate during their second teaching practice. The assignment should be based on a literature review of the topic followed by a plan to investigate the question in practice. The aim is to explore the theory and research behind this topic and then examine how it plays out in school practice. This might take the form of a case study based on your placement school/department or it could be something you plan, teach and evaluate in the classroom. The assignment is written up as a 5,000 word account of your project.

        " ["Shakespeare in Education"]=> string(847) "

        The module is intended for teachers, theatre in education practitioners and anyone with experience of involving young people with Shakespeare. It will enable participants to explore and critically evaluate social and cultural issues involved in teaching Shakespeare in diverse educational settings. The module explores recent innovations in pedagogical approaches, including active drama workshops and the use of Shakespeare-based computer games (eg in school classrooms, museum settings etc).

        Participants will be supported in providing a theorised account of their own and/or others' current practice in relation to teaching Shakespeare. There will be opportunities for participants to engage with a range of theoretical perspectives and to test these out in relation to particular texts and particular experiences of these texts.

        " ["Simulation in Clinical Education"]=> string(2106) "

        This module focuses on the use of simulation in clinical education. It is run in partnership with UCLH, with one of the five days spent in their simulation centre. The module provides participants with the opportunity to explore the implications of using simulations for teaching and learning, and in so doing, to deepen their understanding of the role that simulation can play in clinical education and training. It also provides practical experience of scenario design and de-briefing.

        We will explore different theoretical approaches to learning and teaching most relevant to simulation-based education, and examine their pedagogical implications in the instance of simulation use. The important theoretical debates around simulation in educational settings will be reviewed, including including the transfer of knowledge from simulated to real settings; the development of teamwork and a safer organisational culture; curriculum and scenario planning as well as de-briefing strategies; and approaches for evaluating the effectiveness of training interventions. Key questions for this module are: how does learning with simulation technologies transfer to sites of 'real' clinical practice? How do we design pedagogically informed simulation scenarios? How does simulation affect what is learned about clinical practice? For what educational purposes is simulation suitable and unsuitable?

        The module is taught by leading researchers in the field of simulation and educational technology and will make extensive use of empirical research. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss and reflect on their own experience of teaching and learning, through group tasks and class discussions. By the end of the module, participants will be able to draw on a range of theoretical ideas, and key debates to inform their teaching and learning through simulation, together with primary methods of evaluation.

        The module can be taken as a short course. It can also be taken as a component of a number of MA, Diploma and PG cert programmes at the Institute of Education.

        " ["Small Group and Chamber Music Coaching"]=> string(1094) "This module will provide participants with an opportunity to explore and integrate a range of practical and theoretical issues of small group and chamber music coaching in a workshop setting. Participants will develop an understanding of key issues in ensemble coaching and to reflect on how these relate to current practice. The module will promote a questioning and analytical approach to the issues that affect small-group coaching, learning and assessment. In particular, participants will consider the roles and responsibilities of being an ensemble coach; e.g. providing inspiration, providing musical direction, setting the curriculum, creating performance opportunities, dealing with interpersonal problems, providing feedback. The module aims to raise awareness of the wider benefits of alternatives to the master-apprentice model, e.g. autonomous learning, deep' learning and intrinsic motivation on the part of the students, professional satisfaction and development on the part of the teacher, fostering creative communities of practice at the institutional level.

        " ["Social and Developmental Psychology"]=> string(926) "

        Social Psychology is the study of how and why people think, behave and feel. You'll find elements of social psychology in everything you do, and often people will claim they are social psychologists, or running a 'social experiment' without actually considering what this means: rigorous experimental methods are often used to test social psychological issues. We will discuss social issues such as identity, group processes, leadership, and think about when and why people act positively or negatively towards others (often without realising).

        Developmental Psychology is the study of how and why people change over their lifespan. Research in this field used to focus predominantly on childhood, but actually developmental psychology covers the prenatal period all the way up to the end of life. You will cover topics such as attachment, typical and atypical development, peer relationships, and mid-later life.

        " ["Social Change in Contemporary Society"]=> string(904) "

        This interdisciplinary module will provide students with an understanding of international differences across a range of policy-relevant areas, and key factors that underpin this. It will also explore change within the UK over time, exploring the reasons that underpin change (or lack of change) and considering some of the policy implications that stem from this.

        The module will introduce students to different ways of thinking about and assessing evidence, including practical issues to do with data collection, measurement and comparability. The evidence considered in the module will be predominantly but not entirely statistical in nature.

        The following topics will be covered: education; employment and occupation; income and poverty; class and social mobility; ethnicity and migration; health and mortality; family and relationships; gender; political engagement; and religion.

        " ["Social Development"]=> string(309) "This module considers ideas about the relationship between psychology and culture that have influenced developmental and cognitive psychology, influences on parenting, the development of language and communication, and socio-emotional and cultural aspects of development in childhood and adolescence.

        " ["Social Histories of British Education"]=> string(1673) "

        This module looks at the social origins and development of the British school system. The focus throughout is on the experience of education as seen from the perspective of pupils and students, teachers and educational policy-makers. There is a particular emphasis on the use of biographical approaches for the study of lives in educational settings. The range of topics covered will include: curriculum, gender and education, race and education, schooling and social change, social class and education, teachers and teaching.

        The module provides particular opportunities for thinking about History and its application in the present, and for thinking about and discussing what we have learned and what should be left in the past. Teaching methods include a learning walk to nurture a learning community, which fosters participation and dialogue so that research content and processes become a shared experience. The module uses Blackboard to provide a virtual learning environment (VLE) that supports students' learning.

        The VLE offers a vehicle for communicating with staff and students and a repository of module resources including a:

        • 'Living archive' of biographical resources
        • Picture Gallery'
        • Links to moving images

        Some of the students' coursework has been published in a special edition of Reflecting Education, guest edited by the module tutor. Biography, History and Education: Learning from Lives, Vol 6, No 1 (2010).

        " ["Social History of Learning and Learners"]=> string(620) "

        This module examines the histories of learning and learners and enables students to consider how ideas, theories and policies played out in actual experience as well as the fundamental ways in which learning has been transformed over time. Examining learning will become a source for understanding wider social, economic and cultural factors. Students will be introduced to the ways that learning has been understood and practiced, to the forms of learning that took place as well as the role that learning played in people�s lives. Who was able to learn, and in which settings, will be themes of the module.

        " ["Social Inequality and Mobility"]=> string(545) "

        This module introduces students to the key debates on social inequality and mobility in contemporary societies, covering a wide range of topics, including social class and its impact on life chances and life choices; income inequality, mobility and top income; education, meritocracy and the heritability of intelligence (the Flynn effect); poverty and the underclass; discrimination and segregation; inequality across the world, and the very long run dynamics of social inequality, inequality and mobility in different forms of society.

        " ["Social Justice and Social Psychology"]=> string(819) "

        This module introduces students to advanced topics, theories, and research in social psychology (both psychological and sociological) which aims to better understand and address pressing social justice concerns.

        Indicative topics include: stigma and discrimination, moral exclusion, social and health inequalities, political and religious conflict, intergroup hate, migration and integration, and the development of extremist ideology.

        Building upon their existing understandings of core concepts in social psychology (introduced in SOCS2009 - Social Psychology), weekly lectures will review current and historical social issues through the lens of social psychological theory and research, which will be explored in further depth and application in student-led seminar discussions.

         

        " ["Social Pedagogic Theories, Concepts and Principles"]=> string(503) "This module offers students a conceptual understanding of the knowledge base and theories important to the field. It introduces, and provides students with an opportunity to explore, key theories, concepts and principles in social pedagogy, and the historical roots and values in continental European social pedagogic traditions. The roles of the pedagogue, and the life conditions for children in public care and on the edge of care are introduced, in the context of pedagogic perspectives.

        " ["Social Policy: Theory, Practice and Research"]=> string(1029) "

        This module provides research-led teaching on social policy in theory and practice. It combines an advanced overview of the theoretical base of the field with a range of real world examples drawn from different policy settings in the UK and other countries. Particular attention is drawn to the role of research evidence in policy processes, from conception through to implementation and evaluation. The module starts off by looking at key concepts, models and theories of policy-making, such as redistribution, citizenship, and so on. It then moves on to illustrate them by examining policy-making across different policy sectors, such as education, health and social care. Policy initiatives examined in each case study will be chosen to highlight particular concepts and debates. We then go on to examine in greater detail the theory and practice of using research and analysis to inform social policy choices and decisions, including looking at different methods of measuring and evaluating research uptake and impact.

        " ["Social Psychology"]=> string(942) "

        Social psychology explores the individual, the social context of behaviour and the relationship between the two. This second year module builds on foundational first year courses in psychology, introducing students in greater depth to social psychology. It will encourage you to think in an interdisciplinary way by linking social psychology to other subject domains in psychology, and in particular to topics in other social science disciplines (particularly sociology).

        Students will be presented with key theories, methods (including experimental work), concepts as well as new developments in the field of social psychology. Examples of key topics which will be covered include; attitudes and attitude change, social constructionism, social cognition, the self and social identity, group behaviour, social influence, violence and aggression, prosocial behaviour, prejudice and discrimination and interpersonal relationships.

        " ["Social Science Seminar"]=> string(724) "

        This module evolves around a series of weekly keynote lectures by leading policy makers and academics in the realm of social science. Each session will focus on a topical area within the social sciences such as social mobility, happiness and wellbeing, gender equality and women’s rights, multi-ethnic Britain.

        Students will be introduced to diverse perspectives adopted by organizations and policy actors to solve contemporary social issues. In the module students will experience a series of training workshops in technologies and software to develop evaluative and analytical skills to help them produce policy-literate and numerate social science evidence briefings on MS Publisher and Data visualisation.

        " ["Social Networks"]=> string(583) "

        Social networks are ubiquitous and influential. In this module we consider how social networks underlie various aspects of social life.

        Topics covered include the small world phenomenon, the spread of diseases over networks, peer effect, thresholds, cascades and collective behaviour, fashions and fads, the impact of network in the labour market, homophily, social media such as Facebook and Twitter, networks between organisations and countries, and formal network properties such as degree distributions and the power laws, connectivity, reachability, and centrality.

        " ["Social Theory"]=> string(581) "

        What keeps societies together? How do ideas influence human action and social change? How are social inequalities produced and reproduced? How do we live with difference? This module will address questions and more, introducing students to the classical foundations and contemporary developments of social theory. The module draw on a broad survey of some of the main schools of thought from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries and will account for how social theory is historically, socially, and culturally situated in the wider political economy of knowledge production.

        " ["Social Theory and the Study of Contemporary Social Problems"]=> string(1190) "

        The module provides a foundational introduction to Social Theory. It discusses important theoretical approaches to defining and studying social problems in a variety of contexts, including migration, civil rights, welfare, housing, education, health and social care. Students will learn how specific social structures such as gender, race, class, and the body interact with people's lived experiences of policy. They will be invited to apply critical theoretical thinking for dealing with real-world problems, such as inequality, social exclusion/participation, financialisation, and reflect on the possibilities of enacting social change.

        The sessions will address questions such as: how do social theory concepts explain the struggles experienced by human agents in different sectors of economy and society today? How do certain types of power, knowledge and 'evidence' become legitimated and privileged over others? How do marginalised groups become included or excluded in contemporary social and political institutions? How do they deliberate, adopt, resist, challenge dominant social policies and practices, and what are the diverse recourses on which they draw to do so?

        " ["Social, Emotional and Behavioural Development"]=> string(903) "There is a growing interest in the interaction of social development with speech, language and communication development. This has focused in recent years on issues of behaviour, particularly among those identified as experiencing social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD). Commentators have been concerned at the lack of emphasis on speech, language and communication needs in approaches to behaviour in the classroom and playground.

        This module gives participants an opportunity to examine the issues in detail. The study of interaction between the factors involved and the consideration of pedagogical and other practical concerns are based on the exploration of a range of theoretical models.

        The module is taught by a combination of face-to-face and web-based methods, allowing effective use of participants' time and excellent opportunities for discussion and debate.

        " ["Sociolinguistics and Language in Society"]=> string(1002) "This module offers students the opportunity to develop a critical awareness and thorough understanding of key issues related to sociolinguistics, bi/multilingualism and language in society. After considering fundamental issues such as what the study of sociolinguistics entails and key concepts in sociolinguistics, the module will focus on a range of topics, including language ideologies, multilingual societies and speech communities, language socialisation, language planning and policies, language maintenance and shift, and style and language variation. There will also be a specific focus on researching language in society, with an examination of research design and data collection issues. Readings discussed during the module will primarily be from the past 30 years, although some weight will be given to more foundational and historical texts. In addition, connections will be made to personal experience and professional practice in language education and education as a whole.

        " ["Sociolinguistics and Sociocultural Theory"]=> string(794) "This module offers students the opportunity to develop a critical awareness and thorough understanding of key issues related to sociolinguistics and sociocultural theory in relation to second and foreign language education. After considering fundamental issues such as the social turn' in applied linguistics and TESOL, the module will focus on a range of topics, including multilingualism and multilingual learners, the notion of the native and the non-native speaker, speech communities and communities of practice, scaffolding and collaborative dialogue, language variation, and language and culture that are core to M-level study in the Line cluster. Connections will be made to personal experience and professional practice in second language education and second language policy.

        " ["Sociology of Childhood"]=> string(965) "

        This module provides a comprehensive introduction to key trends and debates in the sociological study of childhood. It offers students an opportunity to explore cutting edge research on the diversity of children's lives across time and place. Drawing on the work of leading scholars in the field, the module will prompt consideration of the contradictions and continuities in ways children are positioned in different contexts. This will enable exploration of adult-child power relations, unequal childhoods, the intersections of local and global childhoods, children's rights, and children's contributions to their social, political and economic worlds.

        Students will examine a variety of representations of childhood (e.g. in film, advertisements, policy) and their social and political implications. The module will encourage reflection on the significance of sociological understandings of childhood for research, professional practice, and policy.

        " ["Sociology of Education"]=> string(837) "

        This module aims to identify and explore some of the major perspectives in the sociology of education, bringing together a team of experts to explore a range of contemporary issues in this exciting and diverse field. We explore the relationships between education, society, the state and the individual, and consider how forces like globalisation and marketisation are impacting education. We pay particular attention to educational (in)equalities relating to social class, race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexuality, migration and citizenship. Over the course of the module you will discover how key theorists and bodies of research in sociology of education can help us to better understand and respond to pressing educational issues. This module can be taken face-to-face or online, and is available as a standalone module.

        " ["Sociology of Gender"]=> string(1021) "

        This module focuses on conceptualising gender and how it plays a role in our everyday lives across the life-course. The module will take students through the various conceptualisations of gender and sex � what these terms mean � and the ways in which gender cross-cuts with other social and cultural identities, such as 'race', ethnicity, age, sexuality, class, and religion.

        During the module, students will explore the impact of gender upon social structures, relationships and experiences, including sociology itself. They will learn to challenge 'common sense' understandings of gender using theoretical frameworks and drawing on empirical examples from across the world. The module will cover the following themes: Sex/gender debates; Femininities and masculinities; Gender and the public/private; Intersectionality and gender; Gendered bodies; Media and representation; Social movements tackling gender inequality; Transgender and intersex; Gender and (neo)colonialism; Gender in sociology.

        " ["Sociology of Race and Education"]=> string(877) "

        This module provides an introduction to the principal research findings and theories concerning 'race' and ethnicity in education. Although these are mainly drawn from sociological work, no previous experience of sociology is necessary. Among the issues we address are: the nature of race/racism in schools and classrooms; patterns of educational achievement; the role of education policy; a critical awareness of the nature of Whiteness; and the intersections of race, class, gender and other elements of identity and oppression.

        The main focus of the module will be research, policy and practice in the English system but you will be encouraged to apply insights and draw on your own experiences wherever you work and/or were educated. The module draws on the insights from antiracism and critical race theory alongside a range of other theoretical perspectives.

        " ["Sociology of Music and Music Education"]=> string(1154) "The sociology of music enquires into the social significance of music and the social organisation of musical production and reception. This module will focus on these issues with relation to the multiplicity of musical styles available in a plural society, paying particular attention to the development and social context of the music curriculum and music educational practices. The module will study the effects of the social context of music upon musical meaning, musical ability, and access to musical opportunity. Recent work, particularly in popular music studies, challenges the suitability of traditional musicological procedures for studying non-classical music. Other work, for example in music and gender studies or feminist musicology, is raising questions about men's and women's relationships to music as listeners, performers, composers and teachers, as well as about whether musical meaning can be gendered. Such issues in turn have implications for the content of the music curriculum in schools, which will be examined both from a historical perspective and in terms of questioning 'what counts' as valuable and worthwhile music." ["Special and Inclusive Education"]=> string(574) "

        This module aims to equip you with the skills to understand and support children and young people with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities. You will become familiar with the different theoretical approaches of atypical development which inform practice in the education and care of children and young people with a variety of difficulties. You will look at how these difficulties manifest, how they are diagnosed and how they can be explained based on literature and research. You will also explore what works in terms of interventions for these difficulties.

        " ["Special Educational Needs Coordination: Improving Teaching and Learning"]=> string(683) "

        This module will:

        • reflect on professional knowledge and understanding, specifically 'How SEN and disabilities affect pupils' participation and learning'
        • reflect upon the SENCO role in regards to the strategic development of policy and provision within the school as well as the day-to-day operational responsibility for the co-ordination of SEN provision
        • provide participants with a theoretical framework for assessment, teaching and learning as a basis from which to offer professional guidance to colleagues
        • develop skills in the use of quantitative and qualitative data analysis of pupil progress and the effectiveness of provision.

        " ["Special Educational Needs Coordination: Leading and Managing Change"]=> string(372) "

        This module will:

        • address leading and co-ordinating provision, specifically 'The principles and practice of leadership in different contexts'
        • reflect upon the SENCO role in working with pupils, colleagues, parents/carers and other agencies
        • develop theoretical understanding of management of change and how to apply this to practice.

        " ["Specialism Mathematics Module"]=> string(840) "

        This Master's level module enables students to deepen their understanding of mathematics and to examine its role in the education of young children.

        Students are encouraged to examine critically the principles underpinning teaching and learning in their subject area, to explore factors that have influenced its development and consider future directions. This allows them to develop their awareness of relevant current research, policy initiatives and developments in practice as well as develop techniques of research and evaluation and consider how they can be used to support their continuing professional development. Through conducting a project while on school experience, students are able to analyse the range of opportunities for learning in and outside the classroom and explore what is meant by effective learning.

        " ["Specialism Module"]=> string(1157) "

        This Master's level module enables students to deepen their understanding of a specialist subject or area of interest and examine its role in the education of young children. Examples of the specialism options include children�s literature, geography, mathematics, new media and physical education.

        Students are encouraged to examine critically the principles underpinning teaching and learning in their subject area, to explore factors that have influenced its development and consider future directions. This allows them to develop their awareness of relevant current research, policy initiatives and developments in practice as well as develop techniques of research and evaluation and consider how they can be used to support their continuing professional development. Through conducting a project while on school experience, students are able to analyse the range of opportunities for learning in and outside the classroom and explore what is meant by effective learning.

        Students applying to the PGCE Primary (Specialist Mathematics full-time) course will be automatically enrolled in a mathematics-focused specialism module.

        " ["Speech, Language and Communication Needs In Schools: Advanced Practice"]=> string(126) "This is the dissertation module for the MA Speech, Language and Communication Needs in Schools: Advanced Practice.

        " ["Dissertation in Social Science with Quantitative Methods"]=> string(317) "

        This double module gives students an opportunity to pursue a piece of research under supervision on a topic of interest to them. Each student is assigned a dissertation supervisor and, in consultation with the supervisor, the student will choose a research question that is appropriate in scope and complexity.

        " ["Statistical Analysis"]=> string(1478) "Aims of module
        • To develop a practical understanding of the methods of modelling relationships between variables
        • To understand which tests of significance are appropriate and how to carry them out
        • To learn about Analysis of Variance, Covariance and Correlation
        • To understand the principles and assumptions of regression-based analysis methods such as Linear, Logistic and Multinomial Logistic Regression
        • To study the impact of violating analysis assumptions, their diagnosis and solutions0- To understand and practice the use of non-regression based analysis methods such as Principal Component Analysis and Factor Analysis
        Intended Learning Outcomes
        After successful completion of this module students will be able to:
        • Select methods of data analysis appropriate to their data and research questions
        • Carry out a range of analyses using SPSS: t-test, chi-square, analysis of variance, correlation, linear, logistic & multinomial logistic regression, principal component analysis and factor analysis
        • Diagnose whether the assumptions have been adhered to in the analyses covered, discuss the potential impact on the results and propose solutions to any problems that may have arisen
        • Critically evaluate the data analysis methods proposed or undertaken in a given study
        • Ensure interpretation of data analysis findings is done correctly and be able to defend the interpretation.


        " ["Strategic Leadership and Resource Management"]=> string(900) "

        This module will explore the practice and theories of strategic leadership and investigate effective resource management in times of systemic change.

        Educational organisations face continual change caused by an array of factors that are manifested globally and impact upon national, local and institutional policies and practices. Fundamental to such change is the rapid growth of information technologies in the 21st century which bring into focus the need to constantly review and amend practice in the light of emerging knowledge. A key tenet of such approaches to leadership is take action before full knowledge is available and to constantly explore possible new development. This leadership behaviour needs to be supplemented with effective resource management. A major part of this module will therefore focus on budget setting and management within fluid systems of education.

        " ["Subject Studies - Art and Design (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1007) "

        This module has been designed as an introduction to learning and teaching art and design. It draws on the subject knowledge and experience that you bring to the course and enables you to translate and extend understanding of Art and Design in the field of visual and material culture to pedagogy.

        You are required to reflect critically on your own experience as learners, critique orthodox approaches to secondary art and design and develop strategies to acknowledge contemporary practices in the field of cultural production. Through practice-based research and a critical engagement with recent and relevant texts (including, government policies and recent research in the field), you are asked to reflect on your specialist knowledge and creative practice to identify significant factors that influence your ways of working, gaining deeper insights into creative processes in the field of visual and material culture and the conditions required to support and develop creativity in others.

        " ["Subject Studies - Citizenship (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(706) "

        This module will explore the key areas of teaching, learning and assessment in relation to citizenship education such as: the teaching of controversial issues; developing skills of active citizenship; oracy and debate; assessment in citizenship; the development of subject knowledge and citizenship and ICT.

        Most of the subject studies sessions of the citizenship PGCE course will contribute towards the taught element of this module. The reflection and comparison of experiences with your cohort will also play a key role. This discourse will enable the development of a broader understanding of the subject which will allow for a greater critical relationship with the relevant literature.

        " ["Subject Studies - Computing with ICT (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1210) "

        This module addresses the core issues of:

        • Understanding the curriculum.
        • Effective teaching of computing as a school subject.
        • The assessment of pupil's learning.
        In this module you will explore the nature of computing as an element in the wider school curriculum and the relationship between what we teach and what pupils need to know, understand and be able to do in a digital society. We will explore the complex relationship between coding, programming and computational thinking and the various approaches to teaching which we may apply. You will learn to critically evaluate a range of accredited courses including GCSE and A level, and develop your capacity to design and deliver lessons and small units of work. We will explore the relationship between the subject content of computing and teaching and learning by applying a range of theoretical constructs which are applicable at classroom level.

        The module will develop your capacity to track pupil progress, measure attainment and use assessment data to improve teaching and use assessment data to improve teaching and learning. The module is assessed by a written assignment addressing the issues above.

        " ["Subject Studies - Economics (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(495) "

        The module examines the distinctive qualities and conceptual underpinnings of economics education and the implications of these for teaching, learning, and assessment of the subject. Assessment is through a 5,000 word essay which comprises of three parts: a critique of two academic papers; an evaluation of a teaching episode focusing on pupils� learning of a concept; and a critical reflection of pupils� learning with reference to the educational arguments of the two papers.

        " ["Subject Studies - Music (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(934) "

        This module serves as a broad introduction to the foundations of Music Education across the secondary school sector. Student teachers will focus on a variety of approaches to planning, teaching and assessment both in the context of their Music classroom and in their extra-curricular work. Students will consolidate, adapt and extend their knowledge of music teaching and learning as appropriate to the range of school students.

        For this module, there are a range of tasks, including online group work, a written case study and an arrangement/composition and rehearsal task that require students to reflect upon their work with school ensembles. Throughout this module, students are encouraged to reflect critically on their own experiences as teachers and learners, to engage with recent and relevant theories of teaching and learning and to develop their subject expertise and skills as musicians and music teachers.

        " ["Subject Studies - Social Science (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(911) "

        The module examines the distinctive qualities and conceptual underpinnings of social science education, and the implications of these for teaching, learning, and assessment. It aims to help students to become competent and reflective teachers of social science. Students are introduced to the social science curriculum, which covers sociology and psychology as main subjects.

        Students will be expected to develop a critical and theoretical approach to these areas. They will be explored through reading and critical reflection on practice and also supported through school-based training and mentoring sessions. Practical issues such as planning lessons, schemes of work and examination specifications are explored as well as the theory underpinning the development of the social science curriculum. These sessions aim wherever possible to bring together practice, research and educational theory.

        " ["Supporting Learners and Learning"]=> string(1414) "

        This module has six units which explore the following themes:

        • Reflecting on your learning
        • Different conceptions of learning
        • Beliefs about learners
        • Beliefs about learning
        • Models of learning
        • Effective learning and effective learners.

        Through these six units the module explores conceptions and beliefs about learners and learning in order to consider the concept of effective learning. "Supporting" is a key word in this module, with a focus on participants developing knowledge and understanding of educational theories around learning. The module deliberately considers alternative viewpoints about learning such that it supports critical analysis and evaluation of practice and policies which may inform that practice. Through the learning community there will be opportunities to share practice, to consider planning and designing learning, and to reflect through developing an action plan for learning in participants' settings.

        This module is taught fully online through our virtual learning environment (VLE) Moodle. Attendance for individual participants is measured through access to the material and activities, responses in forums and completion of tasks which are shared online via Keep In Touch (KIT) forums. Please contact the programme administrator for further details: ioe.aep@ucl.ac.uk" ["Supporting Learners and Learning (H-level)"]=> string(1270) "This module enables students to focus specifically on methods of helping learners, either traditionally in the classroom or online or both. They will undertake some brief action research, involving methods such as trials of new classroom procedures, teaching observations, questionnaires or semi-structured interviews with learners or teaching colleagues in their own institutions, and so on. Like several other modules in the Advanced Educational Practice programme, this is a self-study module requiring 60 hours of study in the participant's work place. Support is given in a structured workbook, including readings, that guides them through a reflective process and requires no attendance at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE). Where possible and appropriate, there will be liaison and peer group discussions with other students following the same module. A tutor will be available by email or through the Blackboard VLE to respond to questions. Participants will be guided to provide a portfolio in four sections covering a review of a selection of literature of their choice, a short account of their action in supporting learning, a reflective account of their own learning during the process, and a report of the dissemination of their actions.

        " ["Supporting Learners and Learning (M-level)"]=> string(1270) "This module enables students to focus specifically on methods of helping learners, either traditionally in the classroom or online or both. They will undertake some brief action research, involving methods such as trials of new classroom procedures, teaching observations, questionnaires or semi-structured interviews with learners or teaching colleagues in their own institutions, and so on. Like several other modules in the Advanced Educational Practice programme, this is a self-study module requiring 60 hours of study in the participant's work place. Support is given in a structured workbook, including readings, that guides them through a reflective process and requires no attendance at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE). Where possible and appropriate, there will be liaison and peer group discussions with other students following the same module. A tutor will be available by email or through the Blackboard VLE to respond to questions. Participants will be guided to provide a portfolio in four sections covering a review of a selection of literature of their choice, a short account of their action in supporting learning, a reflective account of their own learning during the process, and a report of the dissemination of their actions.

        " ["Supporting Wider Pupil Outcomes"]=> string(351) "

        This module will critically explore ways of supporting pupils to achieve a range of wider school outcomes and consider the impact of different methods of supporting pupils. Participants will reflect on relationships with parents and carers in their own educational contexts and determine how meaningful engagement can be secured and sustained.

        " ["Survey Design"]=> string(782) "

        This module is an introduction to survey methods. The module aims to familiarise students with:

        • key principles of survey design and sampling
        • questionnaire design and evaluation
        • data collection modes
        • non-response and dealing with missing data
        • ethnical issues in survey research
        • using data for secondary analysis.

        Each session will be mirrored by a practical workshop seminar where students will put the learning introduced in the lectures to use through real-world practical examples. By the end of the module, students should be able to critically evaluate the quality of survey data which they which to conduct secondary analysis of and to understand the key design issues in implementing a survey of their own.

        " ["System Leadership"]=> string(384) "This module covers a wide range of issues, including the theories and practice of educational improvement and leadership. Building on these foundations, the module then explores system leadership as a way to respond to key contemporary educational challenges, including why and how executive leaders take on roles that work for the success of other organisations as well as their own." ["Systematic Reviews for Policy and Practice"]=> string(810) "This module will provide you with an introduction to systematic methods for conducting reviews of research literature and to the uses of research in policy and practice in a variety of sectors and disciplines. Sessions will cover the following: the variety of systematic approaches to reviewing research; questions and conceptual frameworks in literature reviews; methods for interrogating research studies; searching for evidence (with hands-on work with bibliographic databases); extracting, analysing and presenting data from research studies; quality assurance and management of literature reviews; the use of systematic reviews within public policy and practice. This is the online version of the module, and requires participation in individual and group activities over a total of 15 weeks.

        " ["Systematic Reviews: diversity, design and debate"]=> string(809) "This module will provide you with an introduction to systematic methods for conducting reviews of research literature and to the uses of research in policy and practice in a variety of sectors and disciplines. Sessions will cover the following: the variety of systematic approaches to reviewing research; questions and conceptual frameworks in literature reviews; methods for interrogating research studies; searching for evidence (with hands-on work with bibliographic databases); extracting, analysing and presenting data from research studies; quality assurance and management of literature reviews; the use of systematic reviews within public policy and practice. This is the online version of the module, and requires participation in individual and group activities over a total of 15 weeks.

        " ["Systematic Reviews for Complex Policy Issues"]=> string(1073) "

        This module will provide students with the skills and understanding necessary to design and plan a systematic review of research relevant to policy issues that are complex because of their social nature. Students will gain hands-on experience of and explore the differences between approaches that develop theory, largely through configuring qualitative study findings, those that test theory, largely through aggregating quantitative study findings, as well as mixed methods reviews. They will evaluate existing reviews in areas including public health, education, social care, criminology and social and international development to explore how different review designs hold potential to improve understanding about existing research and the social world.

        Students participate in workshops in a classroom at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) or at a distance via Moodle, our virtual learning environment. Workshops will be recorded and made available on Moodle. All students will be expected to engage in additional individual and group activities online.

        " ["Systematic Review Design and Planning"]=> string(1034) "

        Systematic reviews use robust methods to identify and examine existing research reports on a given topic and to produce accessible, reliable and useful syntheses or maps of research, often for policy or practice audiences. Students will learn the principles underlying all systematic reviews, and the ways that they vary � from different types of research question through to methods for synthesising both quantitative and qualitative findings. Students will apply tools that aid review production and apply methods to formulate review questions, identify research, classify and appraise studies, and plan syntheses of findings. They will apply their learning so as to critically appraise existing review reports.

        Students participate in workshops in a classroom at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) or at a distance via Moodle, our virtual learning environment. Workshops will be recorded and made available on Moodle. All students will be expected to engage in additional individual and group activities online.

        " ["Systematic Reviews: Meta-Analysis, Qualitative Synthesis and Mixed Methods Synthesis"]=> string(1028) "

        There are many possible ways of combining (synthesising) the results of studies in a systematic review. Students learn about, and use, both established and emerging methods that they can then employ in their own research, including: statistical meta-analysis, thematic synthesis, realist synthesis, qualitative comparative analysis, and mixed methods synthesis. Students also learn about the role of study quality assessment during synthesis, and how to interpret synthesis results. To participate, students need to have taken an introductory module on systematic reviewing or bring their own working knowledge of synthesising study findings. Students attend from a range of public policy sectors and disciplines.

        Students participate in workshops in a classroom at the UCL Institute of Education (IOE) or at a distance via Moodle our virtual learning environment. Workshops will be recorded and made available on Moodle. All students will be expected to engage in additional individual and group activities online.

        " ["Teacher as Author - Curriculum Design and Development (H-level)"]=> string(1432) "This module is designed to position the teacher (or professional) as an active and reflexive agent in creating change in the classroom and contributing to school development strategies. The intention is to specifically focus on the teacher as author of curriculum design and development by engaging the teacher-participants in critically reflecting on processes of writing or (re) developing curriculum. The module creates the opportunity for participants to consider the process of curriculum writing in relation to their local (e.g. school), national (e.g. UK) and global contexts It encourages the participants to formulate their own questions, drawing on literature in the field, about what constitutes effective' teaching and learning in the context of curriculum design and writing. The module engages participants in making important links between curriculum, pedagogy and assessment, again drawing on theoretical literature as well as their own research and reflective writing to inform their practices in the production of curriculum. The module is designed to allow for flexibility and fluency to take into account the differing contexts of the schools, colleges and needs of teachers. It encourages participants to challenge their own assumptions by using an approach, which is collaborative, co-constructive and makes connections between theoretical insights and professional practices in curriculum writing.

        " ["Teacher as Author - Curriculum Design and Development (M-level)"]=> string(1432) "This module is designed to position the teacher (or professional) as an active and reflexive agent in creating change in the classroom and contributing to school development strategies. The intention is to specifically focus on the teacher as author of curriculum design and development by engaging the teacher-participants in critically reflecting on processes of writing or (re) developing curriculum. The module creates the opportunity for participants to consider the process of curriculum writing in relation to their local (e.g. school), national (e.g. UK) and global contexts It encourages the participants to formulate their own questions, drawing on literature in the field, about what constitutes effective' teaching and learning in the context of curriculum design and writing. The module engages participants in making important links between curriculum, pedagogy and assessment, again drawing on theoretical literature as well as their own research and reflective writing to inform their practices in the production of curriculum. The module is designed to allow for flexibility and fluency to take into account the differing contexts of the schools, colleges and needs of teachers. It encourages participants to challenge their own assumptions by using an approach, which is collaborative, co-constructive and makes connections between theoretical insights and professional practices in curriculum writing.

        " ["Teacher as Author: curriculum design and development"]=> string(998) "

        This module considers the teacher to be a leader of learning and even where there is a fully articulated curriculum (e.g. in schools in the UK: the National Curriculum) that teacher is recognised as the author of the curriculum, designing it to meet the needs of learners in different settings, coming to the curriculum with different experiences. The module achieves this by through three units:

         

        • Exploring Curriculum Design and Development
        • Investigating Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment
        • Exploring Diverse Contexts

         

        This module is taught fully online through our virtual learning environment (VLE) Moodle. Attendance for individual participants is measured through access to the material and activities, responses in forums and completion of tasks which are shared online via Keep In Touch (KIT) forums. Please contact the programme administrator for further details: ioe.aep@ucl.ac.uk

        " ["Teaching and Learning"]=> string(1144) "

        This Master's level module focuses on Pedagogy and is based on the work of the Teaching and Learning Research Project. The module provides a critical, research and enquiry-led approach to teaching and learning based on current relevant research and publications. It provides an excellent basis for professional practice as a classroom teacher that meets and extends beyond the statutory requirements of the standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

        Students are expected to develop their understanding of key aspects of the field of study and practice demonstrated through a grasp of issues and critical insight into professional pedagogic practice. This includes understanding of learning processes and the various contexts of learning and teaching. The module encourages students to be creative, independent and successful in the application of knowledge in teaching and other work with a range of learners and colleagues. Students build their capacity to analyse teaching and learning within immediate and wider professional contexts, drawing from and applying appropriate intellectual perspectives to teaching and learning.

        " ["Teaching and Learning In Classrooms"]=> string(344) "This module is designed to enhance students' knowledge and understanding of teaching and learning in classrooms and to enable them to develop a range of strategies for promoting learning. The elective is divided into three blocks focusing on (i) the teacher in the classroom, (ii) learning, (iii) teachers and pupils improving learning.

        " ["Teaching and Learning Module"]=> string(1144) "

        This Master's level module focuses on Pedagogy and is based on the work of the Teaching and Learning Research Project. The module provides a critical, research and enquiry-led approach to teaching and learning based on current relevant research and publications. It provides an excellent basis for professional practice as a classroom teacher that meets and extends beyond the statutory requirements of the standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

        Students are expected to develop their understanding of key aspects of the field of study and practice demonstrated through a grasp of issues and critical insight into professional pedagogic practice. This includes understanding of learning processes and the various contexts of learning and teaching. The module encourages students to be creative, independent and successful in the application of knowledge in teaching and other work with a range of learners and colleagues. Students build their capacity to analyse teaching and learning within immediate and wider professional contexts, drawing from and applying appropriate intellectual perspectives to teaching and learning.

        " ["Teaching and Learning, Personalisation and Assessment for Learning"]=> string(588) "The module aims to support participants to investigate and understand pupils' learning and progress, and the implications for practice. Participants identify relevant issues affecting learning and demonstrate a critical understanding of learning theory. They use professional experience including critical engagement with feedback from lesson observations to develop an action plan related to professional development. Participants present an action plan based on a selected focus accompanied by a rationale which is informed by relevant reading and reflection on practice.

        " ["Teaching Business Education in a Wider Educational Context (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(807) "

        This module requires an investigation into an educational topic or issue of the students choice. It should be focused upon the Business Education practice of the student but requires reading beyond that of the Business Education curriculum, with reference to wider perspectives and research. The starting point is a research question, chosen by the student, that they will have to investigate.

        The module allows the student to choose a business-related topic that is of interest to them in relation to their professional practice. Students are required to conduct research in their chosen field, analyse their findings and give recommendations arising out of the enquiry. This also allows students to reflect upon how this action research has helped develop their own professional development.

        " ["Teaching Controversial Issues"]=> string(955) "

        Teaching often involves examining areas that are known or that are agreed upon. However, many aspects of the world are not known. Many issues - political, moral, social, historical, aesthetic and scientific - are matters of belief often supported by various forms of reason. In these areas different beliefs are contested and can be matters of controversy.

        This module is an introduction to the philosophical and pedagogical questions raised by the teaching of controversial issues. It aims to offer both a theoretical basis and practical strategies for teaching controversial issues in schools. Participants will explore what controversial issues are and why they should be taught, examine concepts such as tolerance and respect and consider the role of reason in developing opinion. They will reflect on the role of the teacher in classroom discussions of controversial issues and explore a range of pedagogical techniques and resources.

        " ["Teaching English: Theories and Approaches"]=> string(261) "

        This module explores ESOL Theories and Frameworks. It is developed for an international cohort. The module will provide the theoretical foundations to enable further study in the field for students with little or no experience of classroom teaching.

        " ["Teaching for Independent Student Inquiry (ISI)"]=> string(676) "

        This novel distance-learning module is directed at practitioners teaching on independent student inquiry courses such as Extended Project Qualifications, IBac and Critical Thinking. Its emphasis is on the philosophical underpinnings of student inquiry, critical thinking and writing and on supporting independent inquiry. There will be regular opportunities for online collaborative inquiry with fellow students and tutors. The module can be studied as part of the MTeach qualification or as a standalone. Study takes place over a school year and is designed to fit in with the student's schedule.

        Please contact mteach@ioe.ac.uk for further details.

        " ["Technology and Education Beyond the Classroom"]=> string(934) "

        The module focuses on questions of pedagogy and education for supporting learners outside of classroom settings. This would include, for example, online education, mobile learning used as part of a formal curriculum, learning with technology in the workplace, the use of virtual worlds in education and the use of the internet to support homework. These areas are considered in relation to:

         

        • learning in different contexts
        • using technology across different contexts
        • teaching across different contexts
        • assessing across different contexts
        • designing programmes of study
        • evaluation and quality.

         

        The module is taught primarily using a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). There will also be occasional web conferences and optional explorations of other technologies within and beyond the VLE. The module will be assessed by structured portfolio.

        " ["The Action Researcher: exploring issues and contexts"]=> string(1217) "

        This research methodology module does not have participants carrying out a piece of action research but does explore all the challenges and advantages of action research. Participants consider an area of research in their setting, make a research proposal and consider the feasibility of their research question being answered through action research methodology. The module is presented through six units:

        • Educational research and developing research questions
        • Research methodologies, paradigms and drafting a research proposal
        • Autobiography and reflective writing
        • Research methods, methods of enquiry and refining the research proposal
        • Thinking about field study: action research in educational settings
        • Refining the proposal for submission.

        This module is taught fully online through our virtual learning environment (VLE) Moodle. Attendance for individual participants is measured through access to the material and activities, responses in forums and completion of tasks which are shared online via Keep In Touch (KIT) forums. Please contact the programme administrator for further details: ioe.aep@ucl.ac.uk" ["The Action Researcher: Exploring Issues and Contexts (H-level)"]=> string(1086) "The Action Research: exploring contexts and issues module is the new name for Teacher as Researcher: exploring contexts and issues and enables teachers and other education professionals to develop their good practice in reflecting on practice in their own settings. It uses 'blended learning' through the use of the VLE 'Moodle' to engage professionals in exploring their daily work and carry out a small 'action research' project of their own choosing. Specific learning activities involving searching for, reading and learning from academic literature complement learning activities based on searching for and engaging with relevant other media resources available on the web (e.g. Docu-dramas, Teachers' TV, Documentaries etc).. Participants will plan, design and conduct a piece of educational research relevant to their own setting. Different methodological approaches of research will be explored and opportunities to disseminate findings to the wider community will form part of the module curriculum. It is possible to explore an ongoing project or begin a new one.

        " ["The Action Researcher: Exploring Issues and Contexts (M-level)"]=> string(1086) "The Action Research: exploring contexts and issues module is the new name for Teacher as Researcher: exploring contexts and issues and enables teachers and other education professionals to develop their good practice in reflecting on practice in their own settings. It uses 'blended learning' through the use of the VLE 'Moodle' to engage professionals in exploring their daily work and carry out a small 'action research' project of their own choosing. Specific learning activities involving searching for, reading and learning from academic literature complement learning activities based on searching for and engaging with relevant other media resources available on the web (e.g. Docu-dramas, Teachers' TV, Documentaries etc).. Participants will plan, design and conduct a piece of educational research relevant to their own setting. Different methodological approaches of research will be explored and opportunities to disseminate findings to the wider community will form part of the module curriculum. It is possible to explore an ongoing project or begin a new one.

        " ["The Action Researcher: exploring issues and contexts (the 'core' module)"]=> string(1217) "

        This research methodology module does not have participants carrying out a piece of action research but does explore all the challenges and advantages of action research. Participants consider an area of research in their setting, make a research proposal and consider the feasibility of their research question being answered through action research methodology. The module is presented through six units:

        • Educational research and developing research questions
        • Research methodologies, paradigms and drafting a research proposal
        • Autobiography and reflective writing
        • Research methods, methods of enquiry and refining the research proposal
        • Thinking about field study: action research in educational settings
        • Refining the proposal for submission.

        This module is taught fully online through our virtual learning environment (VLE) Moodle. Attendance for individual participants is measured through access to the material and activities, responses in forums and completion of tasks which are shared online via Keep In Touch (KIT) forums. Please contact the programme administrator for further details: ioe.aep@ucl.ac.uk" ["The Economic Value of Education"]=> string(1019) "The module aims to enable you to understand how education policies can be rigorously evaluated using empirical evidence. It develops and applies the tools of economic analysis, supported by empirical evidence, to the assessment of educational policies. The estimation of private and social rates of return to education is studied in greater depth than in Economic Perspectives on Education Policy, including the problem of identifying education as a causal factor in earnings differentials. Cost benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis are applied to some specific policy examples. Policy issues examined include how to Increase access to education and enhance the quality of schools and whether performance related pay improves teacher performance. Applications are chosen to reflect policy Issues in both developing and developed countries as well as general, vocational and higher education. Some seminars include hands-on experience in using spreadsheets for analysing economic and educational data.

        " ["The Economics of Children and Families"]=> string(708) "

        The module will focus on how to understand human capital formation in children and consider current research in the economics of children and families.

        We will cover the model of human capital development and the technology of skill formation, parental investments in child human capital in an altruistic model and complementarities of human capital in children. Alongside this we will read and analyse empirical work examining the determinants of human capital formation, with a particular focus on foetal origins, pre-school environments and parental investments, as well as the returns to child human capital for later-life socio-economic, labour market, mental and physical health outcomes.

        " ["The English Language Learner"]=> string(558) "This module focuses on a case study of an English language learner. It covers the study of language and discourse in preparation for an analysis of a learner's performance in the four skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening and the setting of learning objectives for that learner. It also looks at factors that can affect the learning of an individual learner and how knowledge of these can be addressed in the classroom. The module include at principles and methods of assessment in order to access suitable example of learner performance. " ["The Enquiring Practitioner"]=> string(671) "

        This module aims to:

        • help develop your awareness of the ways in which research and theory can be used and recontextualised to personal, professional contexts as an aide to reflection and personal/professional development
        • develop your confidence to engage critically with research and theory - for your own purposes, and the ways other people have used it
        • develop your awareness of the limitations of dichotomous theory/practice orientations in argumentation, through developing your skills in critical reading and the reflexive, academic presentation of practitioner engagements with research and theory.


        " ["The Environmentally Sustainable University"]=> string(1088) "This two-and-a half-day residential module aims to offer an understanding of the dimensions of environmental sustainability as they relate to university management concerns. The module will examine how the built environment of the sustainable university can be planned and managed with a view to achieving the zero- (or even negative-) carbon university. It will go on to consider the types of organisational change needed to achieve the sustainable university, involving changing the way people work in, and away from, the university, transport use, and other matters. Sustainability as a curriculum theme will be touched on, as this will have organisational implications (strategy, staffing, marketing, for example). Sustainability can be presented as a positive aspect of the student experience, but there will be negative aspects to be managed also if, for example, building use is to be maximised and transport use minimised. There are ethical aspects also to be considered: to what extent should universities show leadership to other organisations and can they afford to do so? " ["The History of Education In Britain Since 1800: Landmarks, Debates and Sources"]=> string(984) "Please note that this module is only available to students on the BA (Hons) Education Studies

        The aim of this module is to survey the main developments in the history of education in Britain since c.1800, focusing on key milestones and significant documents, including the Education Acts of 1833, 1870, 1918 and 1944; official publications such as the Taunton Commission, Hadow Committee and Robbins Report; and major debates such as the relationship between education and economic growth, the contribution of the grammar schools and the problem' of private schools. Each lecture will focus on a specific period or theme in educational history, and each seminar will consider a key text in depth. Consideration will be given to the imperial and international contexts in which British education was reformed during this period. The module will also familiarise students with historical souce materials, and will involve staff from the IOE Archives.



        " ["The Learning Sciences"]=> string(379) "

        This module introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of the Learning Sciences while developing their understanding of the theoretical approaches that inform the design of learning environments and teachers' professional judgment. It will enable students to develop an understanding of the cognitive and social processes that result in learning.

         

        " ["The Management of Financial Resources in Higher Education (Part 1)"]=> string(1017) "

        This two-and-a half-day residential module aims to introduce participants to the strategic principles and choices involved in the management of financial resources, rather than purely technical issues, and to examine how these activities may be integrated into institutional strategy. Participants will develop a critical understanding of the professional and theoretical issues involved in financial management in higher education, an understanding of how financial management is related to issues of strategic management in higher education institutions, and an ability to apply this knowledge in professional situations and to present cogent analyses based upon it. Topics to be covered include the principles of accounting, financial forecasting, state and non-state income, and borrowing. Both parts of this module must be taken to fulfil the requirements of the MBA degree.

        Please contact the programme administrator ioe.mbahem@ucl.ac.uk for more details.

        " ["The Management of Financial Resources in Higher Education (Part 2)"]=> string(1020) "

        This two-and-a half-day residential module aims to introduce participants to the strategic principles and choices involved in the management of financial resources, rather than purely technical issues, and to examine how these activities may be integrated into institutional strategy. Participants will develop a critical understanding of the professional and theoretical issues involved in financial management in higher education, an understanding of how financial management is related to issues of strategic management in higher education institutions, and an ability to apply this knowledge in professional situations and to present cogent analyses based upon it.

        Topics to be covered include audit and corporate governance, resource allocation models, and managing devolved financial systems. Both parts of this module must be taken to fulfil the requirements of the MBA degree. Please contact the programme administrator ioe.mbahem@ucl.ac.uk for more details.

        " ["The Management of Teaching and Research in Higher Education"]=> string(697) "

        This five-day residential module is concerned with teaching and research, how they are 'managed' and by whom. Teaching and research are the core businesses of universities but their 'management' at departmental level or at an institutional level does not always reflect this. The range of issues and/or concepts covered includes: the quality process; external pressures for accountability, improved performance and effectiveness; professionalising learning and teaching; building a research culture and managing research; teaching and research relationships.

        Please contact the programme administrator ioe.mbahem@ucl.ac.uk for more details.

        " ["The Philosophy of Religious Education (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(384) "

        This module will explore the history and development of Religious Education (RE) in England, as well as pertinent legislation. The module will present, and expect you to critically engage with, a variety of justifications for and aims of RE. In addition to this, you will be presented with and expected to critically engage with a diverse range of pedagogical approaches to RE.

        " ["The Professional Practitioner in The Lifelong Learning Sector"]=> string(62) "Please contact administrator for more information.

        " ["The Second Language Learning Experience"]=> string(774) "

        This module begins with a critique of mainstream SLA research and proposes that in addition to a focus on the linguistic and cognitive constraints on second language development and the benefit of conversational interaction to second language development, there is a need for a focus on a number of factors which influence, both negatively and positively, second language development. Among the factors to be considered are the effects of age; the role of aptitude and intelligence; the influence of learning style and personality on learning strategies; the interaction between language, culture and identity (including questions of gender and ethnicity); the effects of beliefs about language, learning and teaching; and the influence of attitudes and motivation.

        " ["The Theory and Practice of Reading Recovery: Children, teachers and schools"]=> string(1278) "In this module, participants learn how to assess the literacy skills of children after they have been attending primary school for a year (i.e. about age 6) and how to deliver Reading Recovery to children to enable them to develop literacy skills. Participants will be expected to teach four children every day, giving each an individual half-hour lesson; they will produce a case study of one child's progress through Reading Recovery. Different versions of this report will be produced for different audiences. Participants will also assess an older struggling reader, design and implement an intervention, and write up a case study of this child too. Participants will write a reflective account of their own experience of learning to understand the reading process through this module. Participants will observe groups of teachers training to become Reading Recovery teachers and will keep a diary of the groups' development over the year to build up an understanding of how the teachers' understandings have been challenged and refined. Participants will gradually become more involved in the training process over the year, and will write a reflective report on the group, analysing how this experience has enhanced their understanding of the tutoring process.

        " ["The Theory and Practice of Teaching English for Academic Purposes"]=> string(1007) "English for Academic Purposes is a key area in TESOL and applied linguistics with a substantial body of scholarly and practitioner literature. EAP examines language and literacy practices primarily in the tertiary sector, with the aim of developing insights into and critiquing language related policies and practices that college and university students commonly encounter during their academic studies. In this module, we will introduce major theories, key concepts and current issues in EAP and help students to develop a critical approach to EAP practice in tertiary institutions. As theorising practice is a key element of this module, students will be required to keep a learning journal either as an EAP practitioner in the workplace or as an EAP student on a CAPLITS (or equivalent) course. Drawing on their learning journals, students will design an EAP programme for a group of learners of their choice which will be assessed via an oral presentation and a written critical reflection.

        " ["Theatre in Education (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1140) "

        This module is designed to draw together knowledge of theory, practice and policy in the teaching of drama and English through the devising, construction, performance and reflection on a practical group presentation drawing primarily on various dramatic modes and forms of theatre. The group�s individual and collective experience and expertise in teaching and learning English with drama is reflected upon, consolidated and shared in the development of a dramatic presentation and integrated participatory activities.

        The module draws on the range and variety of subject knowledge that students bring with them onto the course and enables students to reconfigure this knowledge in the context of their developing experience of teaching and learning English with drama in London secondary classrooms. Throughout the module, students are encouraged to reflect critically on their own experiences as learners and teachers, to engage with recent and relevant theories of learning and teaching as they relate to the fields of English with drama and to engage critically and constructively with policy contexts and initiatives.

        " ["Theoretical Foundations of Educational Ideas"]=> string(1298) "

        This module invites students to explore education theory and policy through the lenses of history, philosophy and sociology. The module takes up questions of inequality and social justice in education and encourages students to consider these through a range of conceptual lenses.

        Students work in specialist and cross-disciplinary groups to assess the different insights offered by particular perspectives; explore the compatibilities and tensions in and across disciplines; and consider the contribution offered by inter-disciplinary approaches. The model invites students to explore key debates over the meaning and nature of social justice in education, debates that intersect with questions about the person, society, education and knowledge.

        Participants are introduced to key concepts such as citizenship, diversity, equality, globalization, hegemony, authenticity, inclusion, liberalism, power, the state and subjectivity and invited to consider the usefulness of these concepts for making sense of education policy and practice.

        Students are able to pursue these explorations by engaging a range of formal and informal educational sites and local and national contexts. An inter-disciplinary team of contributors facilitate learning in lectures and small groups.

        " ["Theories of Childhood and Society"]=> string(1186) "

        This module explores cutting-edge research and theorising about children and young people's experiences and their social status in varied global contexts. You will:

        • investigate a range of contemporary social theories about childhood and society
        • examine children and young people's participation in society, including their involvement in working, caring, playing, learning, and taking action for social justice with others
        • explore a range of current issues and debates, including discussions about:
          • adult-child power relations
          • unequal childhoods
          • the impact of the state, economy, and cultural practices on childhood
          • children and young people's friendships and popular cultures
          • changing relationships between school, work and childhood
          • children and young people's citizenship and political participation
        • consider the implications of sociological theories of childhood for professional practice
        • learn from internationally renowned and research-active lecturers
        • explore your own area of interest under the tutelage of expert module tutors.

        " ["Theory and Practice in The Sociology Of Education"]=> string(1067) "Please note that this module is only available to students on the BA (Hons) Education Studies The sociology of education offers insights into the relationship between education and the state, society and the individual. This module consolidates and expands the sociological knowledge BA Education Studies students have gained in Year 1 and Year 2 of their degree. It explores the application of a range of sociological theories to pressing contemporary issues with special attention being paid to educational inequalities, inclusion/exclusion, questions of social justice and possibilities for social transformations. The module considers various axes of power, identity and institutional organisation, including sessions focused on social class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability and professionalism. Over the course of the module, we will explore how the work of some key theorists and selected research in sociology of education can help us to better understand these educational issues and how we might respond to them.

        " ["Thinking Through Identities"]=> string(1245) "

        This module provides a broad introduction to the ways in which social identities have been studied in the social sciences, presenting key debates, disagreements and areas of overlap between different theories.

        Students will have an opportunity to explore cutting edge research on social identities and the fact that everybody has multiple identities but tends to think of themselves in singular ways. The module will explore the relevance of different theories for understanding the place of identity in social life by applying theories to everyday situations. It will draw on the work of leading scholars to discuss and engage critically with issues such as group identities and the notion of 'groupthink' as well as how people negotiate belonging to groups that have lower social status than others.

        The module will enable exploration of social positioning, subjectivity and intersectionality, enabling the exploration of gendered identities, young people's identities and place identities as well as how people come to understand their own subjectivities and change over time. A key area of discussion will be the ways in which identities, and particular ways of thinking about them, have social and political implications.

        " ["Training for Development Education"]=> string(998) "This module asks participants to develop their own theory of learning appropriate to development education, considering its values and aims of promoting action and change. Based on these understandings of learning participants will consider the implications for trainers in development education. They will explore the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values needed to be an effective trainer on global issues. Participants taking this module will have an interest in and awareness of development education and wish to develop their skills as a trainer in that field. The module focuses on process rather than on the content of training. The module will draw on participants' experience, that of their colleagues, fellow participants and the literature. Participants will have opportunities to practice and develop their training either in their work place, possibly through invitations to train from other organisations or through peer-training with other participants on the module.

        " ["Transforming History Education"]=> string(1190) "

        The aim of this module is to equip history educators to contribute to debates (within and beyond specific school contexts) about the future of their subject and to exercise effective pedagogical leadership, informed by professional values and critical review of research evidence, that will enable all young people to become more successful history learners. It includes four units, each addressing a key aspects of subject leadership in history:

        • Unit A - Educational Cultures, Politics and the History Curriculum
          What are the influences that have shaped your scope for action as a leading history educator in shools?
        • Unit B - Pedagogical leadership in school history
          How should leading history educators shape pedagogy according to an understanding of both learners and the subject discipline?
        • Unit C - Inclusion and Diversity in School History: 'Learning Without Limits'?
          How can leading history educators remove barriers to learning history for the students in their schools?
        • Unit D - Professionalism and Innovation
          How can a leading history educator be genuinely professional in the 21st century school?

        " ["Understanding Education Policy"]=> string(557) "

        This module is designed to cover key perspectives and concepts in the analysis of education policy. Topics covered include approaches to understanding education policy and its relevance and import to practitioners. We consider global developments in educational policy (such as marketization, choice of school, private sector involvement in public education) and consider the forms such developments take in England and Wales and elsewhere. The module also provides an in-depth look at some current policies and considers future directions.
         

        " ["Understanding Education Research"]=> string(1348) "

        This module will provide participants with an introduction to a range of research approaches and methods. They will also be able to engage in specialist issues and look in detail at sourcing, generating and analysing specific kinds of extant and new research content. These will include autobiographies, biographies, documents, interviews, life histories, media and multi-media texts, narratives, observations, oral histories, philosophical arguments, statistics and conceptual analysis, photographs and other visual representations, statistics and numeric data. Reading of original source texts of key studies will provide participants with the opportunity to interrogate the changing and contested nature of education research.

        The module is designed to be both multi- and inter-disciplinary, exposing all students to approaches to research from across the foundation disciplines of history, philosophy and sociology. Participants will be invited to explore the sorts of questions that might be asked, and answered, by education research. Moving on, we will think about the implications of these questions for designing research as well as engaging, or even influencing education policy and practice. The role of the researcher, her/his relationship with the researched, and the ethical dimensions of this will be key considerations.

        " ["Understanding Education Research: Numbers, Narratives, Knowledge and Nonsense"]=> string(1057) "

        In this module, students will be helped to become critical, informed consumers of education research, particularly quantitative research. The module is in three parts:

        • Part 1 provides an introduction to the nature and uses of quantitative and qualitative education research
        • Part 2 focuses on technical issues related to understanding education research, introducing students to key research processes and statistical concepts, so that students can read research papers with confidence and a critical eye
        • Part 3 of the module focuses on the relationship between research on the one hand and policy and practice on the other. Part 3 will include case studies of the ways in which education policy, programmes and research interact with and influence each other - for example, looking at some of the ways that education research is used and misused in the pursuit of policy and programme development. It will also include analysis of some of the challenges associated with producing high quality education research.
        " ["Understanding Learning and Thinking in A-level Mathematics"]=> string(1289) "Please note that this module is only available to those who have applied and been accepted on the Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching Advanced Mathematics.

        The curriculum for this module is organised around two strands:

        • mathematical content topics
        • 'big ideas' that focus on powerful themes of mathematical pedagogic content knowledge: multiple representations, awareness of multiple strategies, exploring and extending students' understanding through questioning, using mis-conceptions and errors for learning, infinity, doing and un-doing, proving.

        These two strands are interlinked so that students can understand that there are powerful themes cutting across core mathematics topics, making mathematical connections from which new mathematical ideas are formed, and making connections between ways of thinking and communicating that characterise the practices of learning advanced mathematics.

        The module is assessed by a portfolio of personal reflections on the course study days, and a 4000-word essay that reviews their own learning and learning-about- teaching for a chosen mathematical topic. These are supported by key readings, peer presentations and tuto-rial comment on a draft.



        " ["Understanding Mathematics Education"]=> string(634) "

        This module addresses significant issues in mathematics education at all levels of education. The role of mathematical knowledge in the curriculum and in teaching and learning is a major theme, as is the role of the social context in which mathematics and mathematics education are done. This includes consideration of mathematics in the workplace and in different cultural settings as well as issues of gender, social class, language and assessment.

        Participants are introduced to the research literature and consider how different orientations to mathematics, learning and teaching affect research, policy and practice.

        " ["Understanding Research"]=> string(769) "

        The aim of this module is to provide a general introduction to social research, advancing students' ability to recognise, describe and appraise different types, principles and practices of research in education and the social sciences. As well as critically reading research, participants gain first-hand experience in and reflect critically on doing research. The following topics will be considered:

        • purposes of research
        • theory and research
        • research ethics
        • research questions
        • research designs
        • data collection methods
        • qualitative data analysis
        • quantitative data analysis
        • selection and representation in research
        • academic literature
        • judging the quality of research.

        " ["Understanding Social Policy"]=> string(837) "

        This module introduces students to social policy in terms of contemporary social problems and the drivers of social change. It emphasises human rights, social justice and the development of human potential taking into consideration a range of domains such as education, health, welfare, criminology, climate change, and international development. You will consider how academic disciplines across the social sciences contribute to the development, implementation and evaluation of social policy. You will also consider the role of governments and NGOs in the policy-making process. You will debate the role of theory, values, empirical evidence and participative democracy in addressing social problems. In doing so you will develop transferable skills in developing arguments, critiquing text, and written and oral communication.

        " ["Understanding SpLD (dyslexia)"]=> string(1041) "

        The module focuses on the application of psychology to the study of literacy development and dyslexia, and in particular, it recognises the importance of spoken language for the acquisition of written language (i.e., reading and spelling). It will first consider what it means to be a skilled reader and the challenges facing the child at the start of reading instruction before looking at current theory on how children learn to read and the core foundations for literacy development.

        Sessions will introduce models of skilled word recognition to examine the cognitive processes involved in skilled decoding and how these models have been useful to further our understanding of reading development and dyslexia. The module will explore research at the behavioural, cognitive, biological and environmental levels of description that all aim to further our understanding of the complex causal processes involved in learning to read and dyslexia. Sessions will then go beyond decoding to consider text reading and comprehension.

        " ["Understanding Teaching"]=> string(817) "

        The Understanding Teaching (UT) module is designed specifically for new/early career teachers usually in their first or second year of teaching. Acknowledging this busy early stage of a teaching career it is run over a complete academic year with a mix of online discussions and face to face (f2f) sessions once a term.

        It is multi-phase (primary, secondary and post-16), multi subject and uses online group discussion of key issues, with participant's personal teaching contexts being central in this process. Coursework is a piece of work devised to evaluate an aspect of teaching that is of personal and professional interest. It enables participants to demonstrate critical awareness in evaluating what, why, and how they teach, and their commitment to developing pedagogical and professional skills.

        " ["Understanding Teaching and Learning in Higher and Professional Education"]=> string(0) "" ["Understanding the policy process"]=> string(982) "

        This module aims to develop understanding of the policy process and skills in policy analysis. Students will be introduced to a selection of important policy theories and their use for studying the making of social policy. Although much of the material refers to the UK policy context, the focus of the module is international and students attend with an interest in a range of social policy sectors and disciplines.

        After taking this module students should:

        • have a critical insight into the policy process and how and why change may occur, including the influence of social research at different stages
        • know about a selection of important policy theories and recognise their main strengths and weaknesses
        • be aware of key issues and challenges related to the study of the policy process
        • be able to apply these insights to a case study that demonstrates understanding of how and why specific policies were developed.

         

        " ["Understanding the Teaching and Learning of Chinese Mandarin in Schools"]=> string(858) "

        This module provides participants with a platform and opportunities to reflect on their teaching and deepen their understanding of teaching Mandarin Chinese across the primary and secondary sectors. The module aims to:

        • provide a critical, research-aware and practice-oriented approach to the theoretical and empirical issues concerning the teaching and learning of Mandarin Chinese
        • understand the relationship between theory, research, professional development and classroom practice
        • promote the deepening and extension of intellectual perspectives and practical pedagogical knowledge and skills appropriate to the diverse range of school contexts and school students
        • develop the module participants� criticality to evaluate the assumptions that underlie policy and practice and to challenge orthodoxies.

        " ["Understanding the Teaching and Learning of Mandarin Chinese in Schools"]=> string(858) "

        This module provides participants with a platform and opportunities to reflect on their teaching and deepen their understanding of teaching Mandarin Chinese across the primary and secondary sectors. The module aims to:

        • provide a critical, research-aware and practice-oriented approach to the theoretical and empirical issues concerning the teaching and learning of Mandarin Chinese
        • understand the relationship between theory, research, professional development and classroom practice
        • promote the deepening and extension of intellectual perspectives and practical pedagogical knowledge and skills appropriate to the diverse range of school contexts and school students
        • develop the module participants� criticality to evaluate the assumptions that underlie policy and practice and to challenge orthodoxies.

        " ["Understanding Theories and Frameworks for Teaching Disabled Learners"]=> string(0) "" ["Using Stata efficiently and effectively"]=> string(724) "

        This module teaches students how to use the statistics programme Stata efficiently and effectively. It will begin by providing a revision of data analysis documentation using the Stata do-file editor. The module will then move on to show students how they can access Stata results post-estimation, and move the results to other formats, such as Excel or .csv files. It will illustrate how loops, local and global macros can be used in Stata to perform repetitive tasks efficiently and effectively. The module will then cover the State program command, providing students with a basic introduction to Stata .ado file writing. The final weeks will illustrate how Stata can be used to produce replicable graphs in Excel.

        " ["Vocational Learning: Policy and Practice"]=> string(1255) "

        This module examines the relationship between work, learning and vocational education and training (VET) through an exploration of critical debates, theories and concepts in this field. With a focus on the changing nature and organisation of working practices, it explores questions in the field of policy and practice by asking:

        1. What do we mean by 'vocational' in further and higher education?
        2. What knowledge and skills should be included in curricula that prepare learners for occupations? Why?
        3. Is there a specific VET pedagogy?
        4. How should learning at college and/or university be combined with learning at work?
        5. To what extent can and should issues of social justice (e.g. gender equity) be addressed through VET policy and practice?
        This module will be of interest to anyone who is involved in planning, organising and/or teaching on vocational and applied studies programmes in Further Education (FE), Higher Education (HE) and training organisations and who wish to develop their understanding of the dynamic relationship between working and learning. It will also be of interest to educationalists and policy makers who question the shape and content of systems of education around the world.

        " ["Ways of Thinking and Ways of Being"]=> string(1281) "

        This module, an option module in the second year of the BA Education Studies programme, explores ways in which human beings think and reason. What is it to think well? What is the role of reason in matters of emotion? Reasoning has been taken to be the feature of human beings that separates them most clearly from animals. How far is this true? The module explores what it is to be a human being from a variety of perspectives. It considers how far the difference between human beings and animals justifies the ways that animals are treated, a question that itself exposes profound differences between cultures. It goes on to consider what is revealed about human being by the advent of technologies of birth control and selection, and what this in turn suggests about the organisation of society. The module addresses philosophical questions in the light of classic sources, illustrated with examples drawn from real life and works of literature. The module works with texts that draw attention to the embedding of certain assumptions in the development of Western thinking and ways of being. This includes consideration of the gendered nature of dominant conceptions of reason, as well as the contrast between such conceptions and other non-Western traditions of thought.

        " ["What is Education?"]=> string(528) "

        This module will introduce students to the main ideas, concepts and theories that underpin education. It will explore the study of education in an international context, reflecting on readings and theoretical ideas as well as relating them to personal experience and contexts. The module will also explore what is meant by scholarship in the study of education and the expectations of working at Masters level. Sessions will comprise keynote lectures from experts in their field of education, supported by group seminars.

        " ["Widening Leadership (M-level)"]=> string(880) "You may be able to choose this module as an external option on a number of UCL Institute of Education (IOE) Masters programmes, but please note that prior experience is an entry requirement. Please check with the module administrator if you are unsure.

        This module is a follow up to the Developing Leaders module (MMADLP_01) and is also designed by the London Centre for Leadership in Learning (LCLL). It progresses ideas first explored in the earlier module developing communication skills, motivation and leading beyond the team. Participants also consider managing contentious issues and whole school matters. This module is ideal for those who've completed the Developing Leaders module or for those ready to move from middle leadership into senior leadership positions. It is relevant for support staff as well as teachers.



        " ["Wider Educational Context: Assessing Psychology in the Wider Educational Context (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1017) "

        The module examines the wider educational context in which psychology education is located, and the implications of these for teaching, learning, and assessment.

        Students are guided in gaining an understanding of recent legislation and current developments in educational theory and practice. They are expected to develop an inclusive approach to the needs of all students, in line with the provision of Equal Opportunities. They will know about the network of services and professional organisations available to support their teaching and the welfare of their students and develop ICT skills relevant to the classroom and professional requirements. They will use methods of marking and assessment relevant to exam requirements and apply wherever possible the principles of �assessment for learning�.

        Students will be expected to develop a critical and theoretical approach to these areas. These sessions aim wherever possible to bring together practice, research and educational theory.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Art and Design (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(867) "

        This module is designed to introduce you to the cultural/ethical/social issues pertinent to learning and teaching Art and Design in secondary schools. It aims to promote a critical approach to the art and design curriculum and encourages you to reflect on issues, attitudes and values in order that you can make reasoned and informed judgements about your teaching based on an understanding of pupil diversity and how this affects learning.

        Throughout the module you are expected to engage critically with recent research, policies and initiatives, you are encouraged to reflect critically on your own experiences in education and engage with recent and relevant theories of learning and teaching as they relate to the field of Art and Design. A series of keynote lectures/seminars will introduce you to a range of issues in relation to Art and Design.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Biology (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1028) "

        Effective learning in science relies upon creative teaching strategies as well as purposeful assessment for learning. Students consider perspectives of assessing science learning and the role of creativity in learner engagement and learning. This is investigated through the context of a medium-term lesson sequence for a KS3 topic outside their specialism. Students design and explain the purposes of a creative resource for one lesson within an identified sequence of two to four lessons. They include an explanation of some of the science ideas related to the resource and describe how this may be assessed through a given assessment tool.

        Through assessment using this tool students are asked to critically reflect on how assessment is used in schools and to reflect on their own development as teachers. They are also asked to consider the role that assessment plays in the classroom and how a short sequence of lessons reflects student progress, especially in terms of ideas surrounding 'holistic education'.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Chemistry (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1028) "

        Effective learning in science relies upon creative teaching strategies as well as purposeful assessment for learning. Students consider perspectives of assessing science learning and the role of creativity in learner engagement and learning. This is investigated through the context of a medium-term lesson sequence for a KS3 topic outside their specialism. Students design and explain the purposes of a creative resource for one lesson within an identified sequence of two to four lessons. They include an explanation of some of the science ideas related to the resource and describe how this may be assessed through a given assessment tool.

        Through assessment using this tool students are asked to critically reflect on how assessment is used in schools and to reflect on their own development as teachers. They are also asked to consider the role that assessment plays in the classroom and how a short sequence of lessons reflects student progress, especially in terms of ideas surrounding 'holistic education'.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Citizenship (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(818) "

        This module will explore the history and development of citizenship education. The module will briefly engage with historical and international realisations of citizenship education, however the prime focus will be an analysis of the development of citizenship education in England since 1997. Subject sessions will cover areas such as: the history and development of citizenship education; the aims of the subject; the choices and challenges facing schools; the concept of political literacy; NFER, OFSTED and the evaluation of citizenship education.

        The aims and ambitions for the subject will be critically analysed and compared to reality of the subject in schools. You will be encouraged to draw on your own experiences and critically relate this to a range of the theoretical and empirical research.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Computing with ICT (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1289) "

        In this module we will support you in developing your capacity to apply digital technologies to teaching, learning and assessment. Teachers of computing are often required to lead and support in the development of the use of digital tools and systems for learning and this module will support you in developing your skills and knowledge in this area. The module provides a range of opportunities to gain skills with a variety of digital tools including on-line assessment systems, virtual learning environments and a variety of tools and resources for teaching physical computing.

        Through workshops and practical teaching you will learn about the strengths and weaknesses of various technologies and develop a critical understanding of digital technologies in relation to the particular needs of computing as a subject and in relation to the learning needs of different groups of pupils. Not only will this module develop your capacity to apply and use digital technologies but we will provide you with opportunities to design, develop and use systems and digital tools that you have created yourself. This module is assessed by an assignment focussing on the development and use of a particular digital teaching and learning tool which to will use in your practical teaching.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Economics (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(651) "

        This module builds on the previous one and examines the wider educational context in which economics education is located. Students will use methods of marking and assessment relevant to exam requirements and apply wherever possible the principles of assessment for learning.

        The sessions aim wherever possible to bring together practice, research and educational theory. Assessment is through a 5,000 word essay which reports on an educational issue of the student�s choice. It should be focused upon economics teaching but requires reading beyond that of the economics education curriculum and with reference to wider perspectives.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Music (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(885) "

        This module enables student teachers to develop an understanding of a range of teaching, learning and assessment methods and to synthesise the findings of their school-based research with recent and relevant theory and policy in the field of Music Education.

        Students are given some choice over the focus of this critical inquiry of school-based practice, from the design and proposal of the project through to the data collection and analysis. The project work is to be undertaken in the student teacher's school placement where they are encouraged to reflect critically on their own experiences as teachers and learners and to reconfigure and develop their subject knowledge and subject pedagogy in the context of their professional practice. In addition, students will engage with recent and relevant theories of learning and teaching in the field of Music Education.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Physics (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1028) "

        Effective learning in science relies upon creative teaching strategies as well as purposeful assessment for learning. Students consider perspectives of assessing science learning and the role of creativity in learner engagement and learning. This is investigated through the context of a medium-term lesson sequence for a KS3 topic outside their specialism. Students design and explain the purposes of a creative resource for one lesson within an identified sequence of two to four lessons. They include an explanation of some of the science ideas related to the resource and describe how this may be assessed through a given assessment tool.

        Through assessment using this tool students are asked to critically reflect on how assessment is used in schools and to reflect on their own development as teachers. They are also asked to consider the role that assessment plays in the classroom and how a short sequence of lessons reflects student progress, especially in terms of ideas surrounding 'holistic education'.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Physics with Mathematics (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1298) "

        This module enables students to widen their educational studies and to engage with diversity in Mathematics classrooms. It addresses the place of Mathematics education within the wider experience of individuals and within the school curriculum as a whole, enabling students to reflect critically on the purposes of mathematics education and its roles in society as well as on the practical implications for curriculum design.

        The module encourages students to review the subject knowledge they bring with them onto the course in the context of their developing experience of teaching and learning in secondary mathematics classrooms. Throughout the module, students are encouraged to reflect critically on their own experiences as learners and teachers, to engage critically and constructively with recent research, policy contexts and initiatives, and relevant theories of learning and teaching, relating to the field of Mathematics education.

        M2 assignment for Physics with Mathematics students: in this assignment you will choose a wider curriculum issue, research it, investigate its implications for teaching across a range of subjects, design activities for addressing it in the Mathematics classroom, try out and evaluate the activities with reference to your chosen issue.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Social Science (30 Master's-level credits)"]=> string(1022) "

        The module examines the wider educational context in which social science education is located, and the implications of these for teaching, learning, and assessment.

        Students are guided in gaining an understanding of recent legislation and current developments in educational theory and practice. They are expected to develop an inclusive approach to the needs of all students, in line with the provision of Equal Opportunities. They will know about the network of services and professional organisations available to support their teaching and the welfare of their students and develop ICT skills relevant to the classroom and professional requirements. They will use methods of marking and assessment relevant to exam requirements and apply wherever possible the principles of �assessment for learning�. Students will be expected to develop a critical and theoretical approach to these areas.

        These sessions aim wherever possible to bring together practice, research and educational theory.

        " ["Work and Employment Relations"]=> string(511) "

        This module introduces students to contemporary issues about work, employment relations, and the labour market in advanced societies. It covers a wide range of topics, including the nature and meaning of work, the changing labour force, women and employment, migration and work, the impact of globalisation on firms and workers, how pay is determined, job satisfaction and work attitudes, unions and collective bargaining, personnel economics, and the British labour market in a comparative perspective.

        " ["Youth and Youth Movements in the Modern World"]=> string(1134) "

        This module will critically examine the history of young people and youth movements in Britain and the wider world. It seeks to develop students� knowledge, understanding and skills so that they have a greater appreciation of formal and informal educational settings in which youth and adolescence were situated in the past.

        The module covers a wide range of topics in the history of youth including social constructions of youth and adolescence; leisure, culture and consumption; work and unemployment; justice and juvenile delinquency; youth movements and subcultures; and politics, protest and activism. Students will further examine how young people�s experiences were shaped by concepts of gender, 'race', class and sexuality, and how this changed over time. Students will critically engage with historical sources and historiographical debates on youth and youth movements in order to understand, analyse and evaluate the experiences of young people over time. The module has a primary focus on the twentieth century and is structured thematically with a rough chronological progression over the 10 weeks.

        " ["Youth in a Globalising World"]=> string(526) "

        This module aims to introduce students to the key themes, theories and debates in Youth Studies and to examine the experiences and engagement of young people in different spheres and spaces. Key topics that will be covered include: the social construction of youth; (delayed) youth transitions; youth opportunities and aspirations in further education, work and housing; youth civic and political engagement; cosmopolitan values and youth; online cultures and practices; and the methods and ethics of researching youth.

        " ["Understanding Education Research: Education and International Development"]=> string(1440) "

        This module aims to introduce students to approaches to educational and international development research. It will consider:

        • purposes of research knowledge
        • variable and shifting status of 'evidence'
        • disciplinary, conceptual and political locations of research, underlying epistemological questions about the knowledge claims produced by research and the particular challenges raised by undertaking research in low income and complex contexts.

        The module will develop students' capacities to read as well as engage in education and international development research.

        Students will have the opportunity to explore a range of research approaches and methods. They will be able to look in more detail at sourcing, generating and analysing specific kinds of existing data and new research content. These will include, interviews, policy and media documents, observations, ethnography, dialogue and conceptual analysis, questionnaires and numeric data. 

        Students will be invited to explore the sorts of questions that might be asked, and answered, by educational and international development research. We will think about the implications of these questions for designing research as well as engaging with, or even influencing policy and practice. The role of the researcher, her/his relationship with the researched, and the ethical dimensions of this will be key considerations.

        " ["African Studies and Education"]=> string(182) "

        For details about this module visit UCL African Studies website.

        " ["Approaches to systematic review synthesis"]=> string(393) "

        This module equips students with learning about the many possible ways of combining the results of studies in a systematic review. Sessions will address:

        • Types of synthesis: landscapes/debates and stages/methods.
        • Thematic synthesis and meta-ethnography.
        • Statistical meta-analysis.
        • Mixed-methods synthesis.
        • Interpreting synthesis results.
        " ["Comparative social policy"]=> string(693) "

        This module explores international and historical comparisons of social policy. Sessions will include:

        1. key concepts and definitions to underpin an understanding of comparative social policy approaches
        2. social policy across different sectors, and how this varies internationally and historically
        3. the methods for analysing policies across countries and over time, and
        4. how globalisation affects the role of the modern nation state.

        Illustrative examples of actual comparative policy analysis from different countries and policy areas, including health, education and welfare, are used throughout the module to support the theoretical material.

        " ["Social problems and intervention"]=> string(723) "

        This module considers how social problems emerge and are defined as such, and the role and appropriateness of social interventions as a response. In doing so, it maintains an international perspective. Sessions will address:

        • What makes a problem social.
        • Whether to intervene and the ethical and ideological implications involved.
        • Factors to consider when deciding how to intervene:
          -    source and impact of the problem, actors involved, appropriate methods
          -    using theory to develop social interventions. 
        • The impact of social institutions and organisations, as well as globalisation, explored through the lens of actual practice.
        " ["Disciplines of Music Education - Philosophy and Sociology"]=> string(821) "

        This module covers issues related to the philosophy of music and music education and the sociology of music and music education. Students will explore the philosophical and sociological foundations of music education through discussion and analysis of research and literature related to:

        • Beauty in music and aesthetic theories.
        • Philosophical and sociological understandings of musical meaning and expression.
        • Musical experience and musical knowledge.
        • Music and the sociology of education.
        • Philosophies of music education.
        • Musicology, music education and musical style.
        • Musical value and the assessment of music.
        • Rock and Pop musicians and learning.
        • Aesthetics and technology.
        • Non-Western perspectives on music and aesthetics.
        " ["Disciplines of Music Education - Sociocultural Theory and Psychology"]=> string(808) "

        This module covers sociocultural theory in relation to music and music education and psychological issues within music and music education. Students will explore the psychological and sociocultural foundations of music education through discussion and analysis of research and literature related to:

        • The ontogenesis of musical behavior.
        • Musical development and special educational needs.
        • Musical development in childhood and adolescence.
        • Musical performance.
        • The psychology of singing and singing development.
        • Musical ‘abilities’ and their measurement.
        • Music as social life.
        • Context and recontextualisation in music education.
        • Music, conflict and education.
        • Social justice, social change and music education.
        " ["Muslims and ‘Islamic’ education in western contexts: theories, pedagogies and practices"]=> string(1152) "

        Muslim education has received much attention in recent years, both as a cause for concern and as a solution to issues of integration and social cohesion. 

        Through theoretical explorations and case studies, the module will carry out critical analyses of the theories, pedagogies and practices in Islamic education. School, higher education and community education projects will all be covered. The rise of the phenomenon of Islamic education will be understood through the tools of philosophy and sociology of knowledge. 

        The case studies will help bring in the more pedagogical focus, exploring teaching and learning methodologies and practices seen to be Islamic and the ways in which Muslim educators are developing hybrid pedagogical approaches. The very idea of 'Islamic' will be scrutinised for philosophical and sociological validity – and hence the term has been put in inverted commas in the title. 

        Overall, the module will help develop a nuanced intercultural understanding that will inform the wider educational discourse and its implications for Muslim communities as well as for western societies.

        " ["Introduction to Quantitative Methods for Social Sciences"]=> string(961) "

        The aim of this module is to give an introduction to quantitative techniques that are commonly used in education and social sciences research, while using one of the major statistical software packages – SPSS.

        The module is aimed at students with little or no background in statistics. After an introduction to univariate analysis (one variable) and descriptive bivariate analysis (two variables), the module focuses on regression analysis, which is a powerful method to examine the effect of one or more variables on an outcome variable.

        We will cover both linear and logistic regression models, regression diagnostics and interaction effects analysis. Statistical procedures will be applied to real-world examples to aid our ability to draw conclusions about the social world. Lectures are complemented with computer classes to give 'hands-on' training in SPSS computer-aided statistical techniques for social and education research.

        " ["Economics of Education"]=> string(797) "

        This module examines critical trends and issues facing students, graduates, universities and the taxpayer – i.e. the key stakeholders in education. It will utilise frameworks and theories from economics to better understand the costs, benefits, and incentives schools, universities and students face and will teach the basic principles of empirical economic research while presenting key research papers in the economics of education.

        Students will become familiar with key concepts, facts, and trends regarding education, including: resources and the drivers of expenditures, efforts to improve socio-economic gaps in participation and attainment, the many roles of financial aid, higher education and the labour market, and the debate about higher education/school accountability.

        " ["3D Animation Production"]=> string(638) "

        This practice-based module aims to equip students with the digital skills to make a basic 3D animated short sequence. This practice is informed by theories and critical perspectives through selected readings on the principles of animation design and moving image theory, storytelling and the creative process. 

        Creative practice is a key dimension of this module which focuses on 3D modelling, texturing lighting and animation. This module will not result in a professional qualification, but you will produce a serviceable portfolio including: storyboarding, concept art, voice acting, modelling and animation, editing.

        " ["Digital Game Design"]=> string(696) "

        This practice-oriented module provides an introduction to digital game design. Through the deconstruction and reconstruction of pre-built digital games and the application of theory-based game design concepts, such as game loops and procedural rhetoric, students will have the opportunity to explore various aspects of digital videogames production, including coding, UI design, animation controllers, and asset production. 

        Students will be empowered to develop games targeting diverse platforms, including Virtual Reality, Mobile, PC, and Mac. This critical engagement with theory and practice enables students to create, modify, and critique videogames as informed designers.

        " ["Learning Design for Blended and Online Education"]=> string(1197) "

        This module explores design methods for blended and online education with a specific focus on Learning Design. Learning Design requires a good understanding of the learning process and of suitable teaching strategies, with the aim to create a rewarding learning experience.

        The module will engage in debates on different design approaches and theories to develop knowledge around the whys and hows of teaching and learning with digital technology. Using specific tools, students will build their own learning designs alongside scholarly justifications of their decisions, with a focus on making appropriate use of technologies to support learning in a variety of contexts from augmenting to fully replacing face-to-face interaction.

        This module is appropriate for educators and professionals engaged in the design of online courses and various formats of blended learning. The primary focus is on adult education and training, but knowledge transfer to other contexts, including schools, is possible. We recommend that participants without any experience of blended or online learning take a short free MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) on a topic of choice prior to the module.

        " ["Digital Sociology of Education"]=> string(700) "

        Comprising theoretical and practice-based components, Digital Sociology of Education will introduce students to how new technologies can be used to inquire into and understand social issues in educational contexts. Concerned with the critical study of teaching and learning, students will explore debates in the sociology of education, traditional social research methods, and digital sociology. The module will focus on two primary dimensions of digital sociology:

        1. digital data collection and analysis and
        2. sociological analysis of digital use.

        Students will be encouraged to develop and use innovative methodological practices to carry out educational research.

        " ["Dissertation in Early Years Education"]=> string(599) "

        Students will design and conduct their own small-scale research project, demonstrating a sound understanding of methodology, research methods, and ethics in relation to their work. Content focuses on the development of research skills in investigating some aspect of provision for children, or of children's lives. This will enable an understanding of methodology, including the collection, presentation and evaluation of data.

        Ultimately this module will lead to the development of the student as a researcher and the ability to relate their own study to an existing field of evidence.

        " ["Communicating Knowledge: Possibilities and Opportunities"]=> string(2086) "

        In this module we look at the possibilities and opportunities inherent in, and arising from, experts seeking to communicate their specialist knowledge to non-expert audiences. The module will support students in thinking about, and developing strategies, for making a version of their specialist knowledge available to others in an accessible and useful way in their future professional careers. 

        A key focus is on the presentation of expert knowledge to the general public – examples include explaining educational research to parents, practitioners and government, a scientist developing the understanding of a non-expert audience, and the effective curation of an art exhibition for public consumption. The module will compare and contrast the communication of knowledge from Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) areas with those in the arts and humanities. 

        The module will incorporate a critical consideration of the concept of expertise and provide an opportunity for students to produce and discuss their own communicative artefacts in the form of videos/blogs or other creative pieces.

        " ["Food and Society"]=> string(704) "

        Food is fundamental to survival and a powerful lens with which to view social realities. Social groups are reproduced by activities such as eating together whilst food practices are constrained by inequitable access to material resources and subject to intense moral scrutiny.

        This module provides a broad introduction to the study of food and eating in the social sciences, particularly sociology and anthropology, and why they are now high on many countries’ policy agendas.

        Taking an historical and international approach, students will explore innovative social scientific contributions to the study of global challenges including dietary health, food poverty and sustainability.

        " ["Citizenship, political exclusion and the racialised state"]=> string(1298) "

        This module will provide an introduction to some of the key theoretical, historical and contemporary debates around the relationship between citizenship and racialized exclusion. It will set the background by exploring the origins and development of racism, from the Enlightenment to Trans-Atlantic Slavery, the British Empire and beyond, before examining theoretical debates on the relationship between the state, the nation and its citizens. 

        What does it mean to be a citizen? Is it always the same in law and fact? How and why are people stripped of their citizenship? And in what ways are these in/exclusions produced in space and place? 

        In doing so, it will focus on the way that racialised discourses have come to be operationalised in a range of social processes and institutions, examining how the state is implicated in racial definition and racial management, and the role that ‘race thinking’ has played in the production of inequalities and exclusions. 

        The module will also take into account the articulation and intersection of citizenship with other forms of social differentiation such as gender and class. Students will examine racial formations of citizenship in relation to historical and contemporary examples from across the globe.

        " ["Social Sciences Dissertation"]=> string(708) "

        The final year dissertation is an opportunity to undertake an in-depth, empirical investigation of a social science topic of students’ own choice. It allows students to develop and apply research skills acquired during the Social Sciences BSc.

        Support workshops are designed to 'scaffold' the research process throughout the year on issues such as research design, ethics, literature review, data collection, data analysis. Individual supervisory support will help students to develop their confidence in articulating their ideas and structuring their arguments.

        All students present a poster or oral presentation as part of an end of year celebration of their dissertation achievements.

        " ["Love, intimacy and sexuality"]=> string(885) "

        This module explores the debates and social research evidence around personal relationships in contemporary society. It will mainly draw on sociological and anthropological scholarship. Students will learn about the interplay between intimate life and social organisation, to understand better how wider social forces shape the most personal of experiences. 

        Drawing on scholarship from across the globe, the module will explore how intimacy and love differ across the cultural, socio-economic and political contexts in which individuals live. It will explore different kinds of 'intimate relationships', whether romantic, family or friendship based. Sexuality will be explored as a practice of intimacy. 

        Students will also explore the range of methodological approaches and ethical dilemmas involved in researching personal life and sexual practice.

        " ["Teaching and Researching Speaking and Listening"]=> string(1293) "

        This module provides an introduction to theory, research and practical advice as to how to teach and improve second language speaking and listening proficiency in the most efficient and effective manner (with a main focus on Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages).

        Although many foreign language teachers worldwide have exclusively focused on teaching writing, reading, grammar and vocabulary teaching, very few know how to design, provide and elaborate speaking and listening lessons due to the lack of relevant research and adequate teacher training. However, attaining both speaking and listening skills plays a significant role in second language communicative competence, which is fundamental to being an independent and functional user of second language.

        Firstly, the module focusses on major theories in human language acquisition and cognition to help students understand the processes, developmental patterns and factors contributing to successful second language speech learning and training. Secondly, it features a number of recent second language teaching research projects and their pedagogical implications (including actual learning materials) for teaching global (speaking, listening) and specific (pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar) skills.

        " ["Education, Values and Identities"]=> string(641) "

        The aim of this module is to give students insight in how countries use their education systems to promote distinct values and identities. Comparisons across time and space will inform students of the different objectives that states pursue regarding these values and identities.

        Students will also gain an understanding in the effects of education on values and identities and will be acquainted with the problems involved in trying to measure these effects.

        The module will be theory and research-informed. It will draw on topical themes such as radicalisation, anti-immigrant populism and rise of the social media.

        " ["Causal Analysis in Data Science - Q-Step module hosted by the Department of Political Science"]=> string(1516) "

        This module is a third year core module for students enrolled on Q-Step programmes only, it cannot be taken by other students.

        The module’s main objective is to provide students with an introduction to the rapidly growing field of causal inference. Increasingly, social scientists are no longer willing to establish correlations and merely assert that these patterns are causal. Instead, there is a new focus on design-based inference, designing research studies in advance so that they yield causal effects. 

        This module discusses the nature of causation in the social sciences, and goes on to look at some of the most popular research designs in causal analysis, including experiments (also known as randomised control trials), natural experiments that we can analyse with instrumental variables and regression discontinuity techniques, as well as causal inference over time using the methods of difference-in-differences and synthetic control. 

        We will also evaluate 'observational' methods - regression and the closely related technique of matching - from the standpoint of causal inference. 

        The module has a hands-on, practical emphasis. Students will learn to design effective studies and implement these methods in R, and will become critical consumers and evaluators of cutting-edge research, able to read and evaluate original journal articles. Examples will be drawn from economics, political science, public health and public policy. 

        " ["Measurement in Data Science - Q-Step module hosted by the Department of Political Science"]=> string(728) "

        This module is a third year core module for students enrolled on Q-Step programmes only, it cannot be taken by other students.

        The module focuses on advanced measurement techniques that are routinely used in industry and academic research. It builds on the material in the second year Data Analysis module and covers theories of quantitative measurement as well as practical measurement strategies involving data reduction techniques and latent variable modeling. Examples are taken from the wide variety of social science fields that use these methods.

        This module provides hands-on training in the application of these measurement strategies in real-world data analysis projects.

        " ["Primary Mathematics Teaching: Mathematics and Pedagogy"]=> string(649) "

        This module enables you to explore a range of issues relevant to primary mathematics. We will focus on areas such as the development of early number skills, additive reasoning and geometric reasoning, in order to identify key issues in aspects of subject knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge.

        As well as looking at these issues from an academic perspective, we will engage in a wide range of mathematical activities in order to better understand some of the challenges experienced by children in the classroom.

        This module is for anyone that has an interest in the learning of mathematics in children up to 11 years of age.

        " ["Identities: Sociological Perspectives"]=> string(810) "

        The module introduces students to sociological perspectives on identities: how individuals and groups think about themselves, others and where they belong in the world. It encourages students to think sociologically about how identities are made through relations and processes, influenced by local and global influences, as well as their inherently political nature.

        The module uses the lens of identities to introduce students to contemporary sociological theories they will draw on throughout their three-year degree. Employing concepts from sociological work ranging from symbolic interactionalism and post-structuralism to intersectionality, it will exemplify how identities emerge through one of the most fundamental principles of sociology, the complex interactions of structure and agency.

        " ["Global Issues: Interconnections and Dislocations"]=> string(1044) "

        Our lives are situated within global webs of interconnection, where individuals’ experiences are influenced by large-scale structures and yet local events have global consequences. This module tackles social and political issues through the notion that they are to be understood at the nexus between global, national and local, for example, emerging risks, such as climate change, natural disasters and environmental risk and sustainability, terrorism, hyper-urbanisation, migration, neo-liberal frames of governing and artificial intelligence’s impact on human labour needs.

        The module will allow students to learn about their drivers, causes and effects, their interconnections, dislocations and to understand how they are influenced by global processes, international governing structures and as local contexts. It will also explore how global homogenising forces can be disrupted via local and group action and responses which may, in turn, become more transformative processes that pose challenges to capitalist societies.

        " ["Urban Sociology in a Global World"]=> string(1239) "

        The module will consider the architectural, geographical and sociological construction and power relations making and shaping life in cities and meg-cities, including the contested nature of some of the ensuing definitions of cites. It considers the dynamics of urban life such as how it can generate innovation and wealth creation as well as displacement and exclusion; and the effects of mobility and migration to cities caused by conflict and aspiration and climate change.

        It will tackle these issues by considering the following contrasting urban developments: the creation of urban technological hubs linked to financial institutions; the magnet effects of those entrepreneurial ecosystems as well as the 'urban supernova effects' such as rises in property and rents and social displacement;  and new and changing patterns of mobility and migration, including the growth of refugee communities, and their implications for urban design, sharing space and ideas about inclusive growth.

        The module will also consider new ideas and practices concerning the ethics of urban design and redesign, including emerging participatory approaches which pursue the co-design of liveable cities with stakeholder communities.

        " ["Work-Based Project"]=> string(614) "

        The aim of this module is to provide an opportunity for students to work collaboratively to identify the way in which sociological theory and empirical research can become a resource to assist organisations (small, medium and large) in urban environments and the communities they serve, to tackle issues they are grappling with.

        To do so, students will work on problems chosen from a menu set by a Programme Team-employer panel. This will involve students working off-site in project teams and visiting a number of work environments to conduct an inquiry to identify solutions to their chosen problem.

        " ["Historical Foundations of Sociological Thought"]=> string(1262) "

        What are the great transformations that gave rise to our global society? How did the emergence of industrialisation and imperial capitalism change the world around us and our thinking about power, injustice and global inequalities? How have the big revolutions of the 18th-20th centuries re-shaped the way we think about modernity, democracy and the nation state?

        This module offers a critical introduction to the historical antecedents of sociological theory. The module moves beyond conventional Eurocentric and chronological accounts of key historical events, processes and structures of the modern era. It explores the ways in which 20th century sociological thinking developed as a way to understand these changes and the advent of modern ideologies such as liberalism, socialism and fascism. In doing so it illuminates the historic dimensions of a globalising present, preparing students to engage with ideas around today’s interconnected yet greatly unequal global society.

        The module’s seminars interrogate further these topics, debating de-centred perspectives on historical turning points that drove global change, and encouraging rigorous criticism of the continuing global effects of colonialism, imperialism, and racism today.

        " ["Sociology of Media"]=> string(1034) "

        In the first half of the last century, Sociology was fundamental in defining the analytical boundaries of early media studies, from the study of the production of news, communications and entertainment to media effects and the shaping of public opinion, youth identity etc. Since then, the development of the Internet has led to major transformations in the ownership of media, types of media and the effects of media, and the links between media and race, gender, and class. These significant changes have led to new theoretical questions and thematic priorities as regards the analysis of media emerging in Sociology.

        The aim of this module is two-fold: to take a retrospective view to trace the evolution of media sociology, and a prospective view to assess current challenges confronting sociological analyses of the new media paradigm – monopoly-owned and user-driven digital platforms – the business models which underpin them, including algorithmic journalism, and their perceived 'surveillance' effects. 

        " ["Sociology of the Future"]=> string(1074) "

        Typically, Sociology has been viewed as being 'born' during the 19th century in an attempt to analyse and explain the industrialisation and securalisation occurring in European Societies, characterised by a tendency for retrospective analysis coupled with differing degrees of projection and determination as regards their implications (future of/end of capitalism etc.). Over the intervening centuries, Sociology has elaborated and extended this original focus becoming in the process a pluralistic discipline, theoretically and methodologically.

        Significant, though not necessarily dominant tendencies in this extension and elaboration, were an interest in the concepts of 'imagination', 'time' and 'utopian' and as a result the future. The economic, environmental, technological and social challenges, often presented as 'risks', associated with the 21st century have, however, led Sociologists to turn their gaze in a more pronounced way to focus on the future.

        The aim of this module is to support students to 'think sociologically' about the future.

        " ["Language Testing and Assessment"]=> string(1164) "

        This module explores fundamental considerations and current trends in language testing and assessment. It is designed for all students who are interested in understanding and being able to critically evaluate the design, use (and misuse) of language tests and assessments and/or to apply these principles to construct their own instruments (e.g., for classroom teaching or research purposes).

        Assessments including tests, which are by far the most common and high-profile type of assessment, are essentially information gathering tools designed to gain insight into what students test-takers know and whether and how they are able to apply their knowledge. Language ability cannot be directly observed, so different measures are often used and different performance samples sought. The resulting information, often in the form of a test score, can then be used to make inferences about learners’ (test-takers) underlying language ability and how they are likely to perform in real-world contexts. Sometimes, this information is used to inform consequential decision-making that can have repercussions for individuals, institutions, and/or societies.

        " ["Artefacts as an Educational Resource"]=> string(763) "

        In this module you will visit specialist museums and galleries and through a series of lectures, seminars and workshops investigate how artefacts give shape and meaning to our relationship with the world, our everyday lives, histories and cultures. 

        Through this you will question how societies and cultural values are represented, from Enlightenment debates on the relevance of cabinets of curiosity, to the dilemmas affecting contemporary curatorial and interpretative practices. You will also study the hierarchies of art, craft and design with reference to trans-cultural and trans-historical values. Through the discussion and handling of artefacts, you will establish some of the lexical and taxonomic difficulties of classifications.

        " ["Professional Practice (EYITT)"]=> string(1651) "

        Aims:

        • Thorough investigation and training to meet the Early Years Teachers' Standards
        • Effectively relate the roles and responsibilities of safeguarding within the Early Years Foundation Stage setting
        • Study the impact of research approaches on pedagogy, especially in relation to long term influences on the field.
        • Deliver effective assessment training for teachers in an early years setting
        • Training on forming relationships with families and carers, leadership and development of children in an early years setting
        • Investigate how reflection on professional learning in the light of theory, practice and current initiatives can continually improve EYFS provision.

        Outcomes:

        You will

        • Meet the Early Years Teachers' Standards through effective professional practice.
        • Consider the role of early year's teachers in collaborating and forming relationships with parents and carers, to ensure the best outcomes for children.
        • Consider the role of leaders in early year's settings, and their impact on bringing about change related to children's life chances.
        • Understand their responsibilities in relation to safeguarding within the EYFS.
        • Develop an understanding of the role of early years teachers in relation to multi-disciplinary working.
        • Consider the impact of a research approach on pedagogy, particularly regarding long term influences and educational trajectories.
        • Form an understanding of rating scales, tracking and assessment to ensure young children develop and their progress is monitored and planned for.
        " ["Teaching and Learning and the EYFS Curriculum"]=> string(1087) "

        The module aims to:

        • Provide a critical, research and enquiry-led approach to teaching and learning based on current, recent and relevant research and publications. 
        • Maintain a commitment to social equity and social justice for the whole range of early years’ students, teachers, settings and schools, working towards a culturally diverse society in which the rights and responsibilities of all are recognised and promoted in teaching and learning.
        • Provide an excellent basis for professional practice as an early years’ teacher that meets, and extends beyond, the statutory requirements of the Standards for Early Years Teacher Status.

        Outcomes: 

        You will

        • Have a strong understanding of current pedagogy, research and publications and be confident in implementing this in your teaching and learning
        • Be committed to social equity and justice and incorporate these values into your teaching practice
        • Meet and exceed the statutory requirements of the Standards for Early Years Teacher Status
        " ["Developing Action Based Research"]=> string(1028) "


        The module aims to: 

        • Use a scaffolded approach between partnership settings and university tutors, to give students practical experience of applying research to practice.
        • Through lectures, support students in turning theory into practice to make a meaningful difference.
        • Discover how action research, locally, national and internationally impacts on early years pedagogy and practice.
        • Engage in dialogue with both academic researchers and practitioners about the impact of research on quality of provision and children’s outcomes.
        • Give opportunity for students to participate in workshops and consider the influence of Action Research in EYFS Settings across the 0-5 age range.

        Outcomes:
         
        You will

        • Gain practical experience of applying research to practice in an academic and professional setting
        • Have a good understanding of how current action research has an impact on pedagogy and practice in an early years setting
        " ["Primary - Professional Practice"]=> string(766) "

        Aims:

        You will focus on practical teaching through four interrelated components all contributing to the development of student pedagogical knowledge, understanding and skills.

        Outcomes:

        You will be equipped to provide effective, high quality knowledge on each of the four module components:

        • School Experience;
        • Pedagogy;
        • Curriculum;
        • Professional Issues.

        This module is designed to accredit practical teaching experience and assess students'; practical teaching against the Standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS); these are legal requirements as stated by the Department for Education and Skills and the Training and Development Agency in Schools in the document Qualifying to Teach (2002).

        " ["Primary Subject Specialism"]=> string(1134) "

        Aims:

        In this M Level Module, you will link subject knowledge (chosen from a set of up to 10 pre-determined subject specialisms which reflect the primary curriculum) to practical work in school via a teacher/practitioner research project.

        Expected learning outcomes are:

        • To deepen your understanding of the nature of the subject and its role in the education of young children;
        • To critically examine the nature of the curriculum for primary children and explore factors that have influenced its origins, considering future directions for change;
        • To increase your awareness of current research, policy initiatives and developments in practice related to the Specialism subject;
        • To extend your understanding of techniques of research and evaluation and the ways in which these can be used to support continuing professional development.

        In the context of a school research project, you will analyse the range of opportunities for learning both in and outside the classroom via a subject specialism and examine critically what is meant by effective teaching and learning.

        " ["Primary - Learning and Teaching Through the Core Subjects in the Primary Context"]=> string(1929) "

        This M Level module is embedded within the UCL Connected Curriculum and the research informed Teaching and Learning Principles project (TLRP; Pollard, 2014).

        This module aims to:

        • empower you with a critical, research and enquiry-led approach to teaching and learning based on current, recent and relevant research/publications; 
        • maintain a commitment to social equity and social justice for the whole range of school students, teachers and schools; working towards a culturally diverse society in which the rights and responsibilities of all are recognised and promoted in teaching and learning;
        • provide you with an excellent basis for professional practice as a classroom teacher that meets and extends beyond the statutory requirements of the standards for QTS;
        • enable you to become a critically reflective practitioner and academic writer at M Level. ed learning outcomes for this M Level module are as follows:       

        Expected learning outcomes are:

        a) To demonstrate an understanding of key aspects of the field of study and practice, exemplified via:

        • a  grasp of issues and critical insight into professional pedagogic practice;
        • an understanding of learning processes and the various contexts of learning;
        • an ability to be creative, independent and successful in the application of knowledge in teaching and other work with a range of learners and colleagues.

        b) To demonstrate the ability to explore, analyse, discuss and reflect on teaching and learning, exemplified via:

        • a capacity to analyse teaching and learning within immediate and wider professional contexts;
        • an ability to draw from and apply appropriate intellectual perspectives to teaching and learning;
        • an understanding and analysis of values underpinning or influencing pedagogic approaches.
        " ["Learning, teaching and assessment"]=> string(1605) "

        This module aims to:

        • Enable trainee teachers to gain an understanding of theories and principles of learning and assessment and to relate these to their professional practice in technical, adult and further education and training
        • Develop trainees' knowledge of their subject specific or context specific area and its pedagogy as appropriate
        • Enable trainees to understand and reflect on what is meant by inclusive classroom practice in relation to theories and principles of learning and communication.
        • Enable trainees to reflect more critically on what is meant by ‘good' practice in technical, adult and further education and training.
        • Develop knowledge and understanding of theoretical perspectives and consider how this applies to curriculum design, course planning and assessment

        By the end of the module trainees will be able to:

        • Analyse methods and techniques to enhance teaching and learning
        • Discuss how learning can be made inclusive with reference to appropriate theoretical perspectives
        • Make use of critical incident analysis to evaluate own practice with reference to theories of teaching, learning and assessment
        • Evaluate their own skills and knowledge in relation to teaching their subject or context area
        • Discuss the principles of, and strategies for, motivating learners and managing classrooms
        • Analyse how the design of courses for their subject or context area in technical, adult and further education and training is influenced by theoretical perspectives
           
        " ["Learning, teaching and assessment (English language and literacy)"]=> string(1898) "

        The module aims are to:

        • Enable trainee teachers to gain an understanding of theories and principles of learning and assessment, and to relate these to their professional practice in technical, adult and further education and training
        • Develop trainees' knowledge of literacy and ESOL and its pedagogy including
          ◦ the implications of personal, social, cultural and educational factors affecting language and literacy acquisition and learning
          ◦ varieties of English and appropriate grammatical, lexical and phonological terms
          ◦ the importance of context in language and literacy use
        • Enable trainees to understand and reflect on what is meant by inclusive classroom practice in relation to theories and principles of learning and communication.
        • Enable trainees to reflect more critically on what is meant by ‘good' practice in relation to literacy and ESOL in technical, adult and further education and training.
        • Develop knowledge and understanding of theoretical perspectives including linguistic theory and consider how this applies to curriculum design, course planning and assessment

        By the end of the module trainees will be able to:

        • Analyse literacy and ESOL specialist methods and techniques to enhance teaching, learning and assessment
        • Discuss how learning can be made inclusive with reference to appropriate theoretical perspectives
        • Analyse the importance of a range of factors influencing the acquisition and learning of language and literacy, and their implications for practice
        • Discuss the principles of, and strategies for, motivating learners and managing classrooms with literacy and ESOL learners
        • Analyse how the design of courses for literacy and ESOL learning in technical, adult and further education and training is influenced by theoretical perspectives
        " ["Learning, teaching and assessment (mathematics and numeracy)"]=> string(1861) "

        This module aims to:

        • Enable trainee teachers to gain an understanding of theories and principles of learning and assessment, and to relate these to their professional practice in technical, adult and further education and training
        • Develop trainees' knowledge of mathematics and numeracy and its pedagogy including
          ◦ the implications of personal, social, cultural and educational factors affecting mathematics and numeracy learning
          ◦ the connections between different areas of mathematics
          ◦ the importance of context and motivation in learning mathematics and numeracy
        • Enable trainees to understand and reflect on what is meant by inclusive classroom practice in relation to theories and principles of learning and communication.
        • Enable trainees to reflect more critically on what is meant by ‘good' practice in relation to mathematics and numeracy learning in technical, adult and further education and training.
        • Develop knowledge and understanding of theoretical perspectives and consider how this applies to curriculum design, course planning and assessment

        By the end of the module trainees will be able to:

        • Analyse mathematics and numeracy specialist methods and techniques to enhance teaching, learning and assessments
        • Discuss how learning can be made inclusive with reference to appropriate theoretical perspectives
        • Analyse the importance of a range of factors influencing the acquisition and learning of language and literacy, and their implications for practice
        • Engage with the principles of, and strategies for, motivating learners and managing classrooms
        • Analyse how the design of courses for mathematics and numeracy learning in technical, adult and further education and training is influenced by theoretical perspectives
        " ["The wider context of educational practice"]=> string(1888) "

        The aims of the module are to:

        • Enable trainee teachers to gain an understanding of general and subject specialist, where appropriate, theories and principles of curriculum design, and to relate these to their professional practice.
        • Enable trainees to understand and reflect on what is meant by inclusive classroom practice and curriculum in general and in their subject.
        • Explore the concept of professionalism within the context of the technical, adult and further education and training.
        • Explore key policy and educational developments that affect technical, adult and further education and training.
        • Evaluate the significance of subject specific/context specific pedagogy in the role of the professional teacher.

        By the end of the module trainees will be able to:

        • Apply theories of curriculum design in their professional practice
        • Engage with issues relating to cultural diversity, gender, multilingualism and social deprivation and reflect on how these impact on teaching, learning and assessment in their own subject specific/content specific areas
        • Engage in an informed and critical manner with different notions of ‘professionalism' as they impact upon the teacher in technical, adult and further education and training
        • Engage with the wider community to explore opportunities for developing professional practice, and to exchange ideas and share practice within this community
        • Be able to critique recent policy initiatives and developments and to analyse factors influencing government policy
        • Evaluate the roles of regulatory bodies and inspection systems in technical, adult and further education and training.
        • Debate the extent to which their teaching subject has a pedagogy peculiar to itself, and how such pedagogies impact upon classroom practice.
        " ["Secondary - Professional Practice"]=> string(1068) "

        Aims:

        During the Secondary PGCE, you will undertake two sustained School Placements in contrasting schools. During this time, you are expected to complete a total 120 days in a Secondary School or another approved educational setting.

        You will:

        • Develop classroom teaching skills;
        • Develop the knowledge and understanding that underpin these skills;
        • Develop  subject knowledge;
        • Develop the ability to work with others in a collaborative and professional way.

        Outcomes:

        You will demonstrate an understanding of the QTS (Qualified Teacher Status) standards through a range of evidence as listed below;

        • An Assessment Record File (ARF), including lesson observations;
        • Practical Teaching Files;
        • Lesson Plans;
        • Evidence of Professional Development;
        • Evidence relating to your professional attributes including relationships between you, the staff and pupils;
        • Punctuality and attendance;
        • Other activities of the school where appropriate.
        " ["Subject Studies - Art and Design"]=> string(863) "

        Aims:

        Drawing on your own subject knowledge and experience, you will translate and extend our understanding of Art & Design in the field of visual and material culture to pedagogy. You will be required to reflect critically on your experience as a learner, critique orthodox approaches to secondary Art & Design and develop strategies to acknowledge contemporary practices in the field of cultural production.

        Outcomes:

        Through practice-based research and a critical engagement with recent and relevant texts (including government policies and recent research), you will be asked to reflect on your specialist knowledge and creative practice to identify significant factors that influence your way of working, gaining deeper insights into creative processes and the conditions required to support and develop creativity in others.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Art and Design"]=> string(863) "

        Aims:

        Drawing on your own subject knowledge and experience, you will translate and extend our understanding of Art & Design in the field of visual and material culture to pedagogy. You will be required to reflect critically on your experience as a learner, critique orthodox approaches to secondary Art & Design and develop strategies to acknowledge contemporary practices in the field of cultural production.

        Outcomes:

        Through practice-based research and a critical engagement with recent and relevant texts (including government policies and recent research), you will be asked to reflect on your specialist knowledge and creative practice to identify significant factors that influence your way of working, gaining deeper insights into creative processes and the conditions required to support and develop creativity in others.

        " ["Subject Studies - Business"]=> string(366) "

        Aims:

         You will be prepared be equipped to teach across a range of Business Studies, and possibly some Economics, courses in schools.

         Outcomes:

         You will
         - be introduced to the research base that underlies BE (Business Education) teaching
         - foster an enquiring, reflective and critical approach to teaching.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Business"]=> string(343) "

        Aims:

        You will be prepared be equipped to teach across a range of Business Studies, and possibly some Economics, courses in schools.

        Outcomes:

        You will:

        - be introduced to the research base that underlies BE (Business Education) teaching

        - foster an enquiring, reflective and critical approach to teaching.

        " ["Subject Studies - Computing with ICT"]=> string(665) "

        Aims:

         You will develop a critical understanding of the structure and content of the National Curriculum programme of study for Computing and its associated programmes and assessment arrangements.

         Outcomes:

         You will

         - develop an understanding of Computing pedagogy including such issues as grouping for learning, assessment for learning and meeting the needs of a range of learners in the Computing classroom.
         - demonstrate a growing familiarity with research relating to the delivery of the National Curriculum
         - apply this knowledge in the context of the secondary Computing classroom. 

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Computing with ICT"]=> string(623) "

        Aims:

        You will develop a critical understanding of the way digital technologies can be applied to support learning in the Computing subject classroom.

         Outcomes:

        You will

         - develop skills in the use of interactive whiteboards, animation and digital video editing, the use of virtual learning environments and e-assessment tools.
         - evaluate existing technologies and to develop your own on-line learning resource as part of the module assessment.
         - engage with the emerging body of research relating to the impact of digital technologies on pupil's learning. 

        " ["Subject Studies - Citizenship"]=> string(590) "

        Aims:

        You will explore the key areas of teaching, learning and assessment in relation to citizenship education: such as; the teaching of controversial issues; developing skills of active citizenship; oracy and debate; assessment in citizenship; the development of subject knowledge and citizenship and ICT.

         Outcomes:

         You will

         - reflect and compare experiences with your cohort will also play a key role.
         - develop a broader understanding of the subject.
         - build a greater critical relationship with the relevant literature.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Citizenship"]=> string(872) "

        Aims:

        You will explore the history and development of citizenship education. The module will briefly engage with historical and international realisations of citizenship education, however the prime focus will be an analysis of the development of citizenship education in England since 1997.

        Outcomes:

        You will

        - study areas such as; the history and development of citizenship education; the aims of the subject; the choices and challenges facing schools; the concept of political literacy; NFER (National Foundation for Educational Research), OFSTED (Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills) and the evaluation of citizenship education.

        - Have the aims and ambitions for the subject critically analysed and compared to reality of the subject in schools.

        - be encouraged to draw on your own experiences.

        " ["Subject Studies - English"]=> string(697) "

        Aims:

        You will gain knowledge and understanding of the English as a school subject, of the influence of national and local policy and of a range of subject-specific pedagogies. This module will draw on the subject knowledge that you bring onto the course and will enable you to reconfigure this knowledge in the context of London secondary classrooms.

        Outcomes: 

        You will

        • reflect critically on your own experiences as learners and teachers
        • engage with recent research and relevant research and theories of learning and teaching as you relate to the field of English studies
        • constructively engage with policy contexts and initiatives.
         

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - English with Drama"]=> string(953) "

        Aims:

        You will develop your understanding of the cultures and histories of London school students and engage with issues of culture, continuity and change in English classrooms. 

        Outcomes:

        You will

        • consider the diversity of pupils by asking the question, "Who are the learners and what do they know?"  and understand how this diversity affects teaching and learning.
        • learn theoretical perspectives on the role of language in learning, the teaching of literacies and literature, the principles of syllabus design and evaluation, and the assessment and recording of learners' progress. 
        • reflect critically on your own experiences as learners and teachers
        • engage with recent and relevant research and theories of learning and teaching as they relate to the field of English studies 
        • critically and constructively engage with policy contexts and initiatives.
        " ["Application of Drama and Theatre in English"]=> string(912) "

        Aims:  

        You will draw together knowledge of theory, practice and policy in the teaching of Drama and English through devising, construction, performance and reflection on a practical group presentation, drawing on various dramatic modes and forms of theatre. 

         Outcomes:

        You will: 

        • share and consolidate your experience and expertise in teaching and learning English and Drama
        • draw on your range and variety of subject knowledge, and reconfigure this knowledge in the context of teaching and learning English and Drama in London secondary classrooms
        • reflect critically on your own experiences as learners and teachers
        • engage with recent and relevant theories of learning and teaching as they relate to the fields of English and Drama
        • engage critically and constructively with policy contexts and initiatives.
           
        " ["Subject Studies - Geography"]=> string(755) "

        Aims:

        You will bring together theory and practice in teaching geography, by reflecting on the planning, preparation and teaching of a sequence of lessons. Specific sessions will focus on teaching about place, using maps and other resources, and how to ensure that students make progress in their geographical understanding.

        Outcomes: 

        You will

        - be introduced to ideas on lesson planning, catering for students' needs and how to structure geographical learning;

        - reflect on ideas about teaching and learning, and put those ideas into practice in the geography classroom;

        - consider how children learn geography, and how you can use your subject knowledge to enable them to learn geography more effectively.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Geography"]=> string(715) "

        Aims:

        You will focus on the wider contexts of geographical learning, with an emphasis on on developing a wider understanding of the reach of geography through conducting school-based action research into practice.

        Outcomes: 

        You will

        -  investigate three themes and how they can contribute to learning in geography, or a more enhanced geographical understanding: Assessment for Learning, Geographical Information Systems and Education for Sustainable Development and Citizenship;

        - reflect on practice;

        - choose one theme to write-up in more detail;

        - Research practice in your own context and reflect critically on the findings of that research.
         

        " ["Subject Studies - History"]=> string(564) "

        Aims:

        You will focus primarily on history education and be informed by four principles drawn from our core vision: historical thinking, engaging with the past, history for all and diverse histories. 

        Outcomes:

        You will:

        - focus early on in the module is lesson planning, and then broaden this out to consider the important role of medium and long-term planning.

        - take history beyond the classroom and use the opportunities on our doorstep in London to consider the role of heritage sites in students’ history education.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - History"]=> string(280) "

        Aims: 

        You will explore important generic themes which intersect with history specifically.

        Outcomes:

        You will:

        - focus on learning and opportunities to explore an area of interest such as assessment, dialogue and specific learning needs. 

        " ["Subject Studies - Languages"]=> string(854) "

        This module will enable Student Teachers to develop their understanding of the place of Languages in the school curriculum and their knowledge and understanding of aspects of Languages teaching and learning. The module will provide the conceptual underpinning of aspects of classroom practice and the relationship between language and culture. Throughout the module Student Teachers will be encouraged to reflect critically on their classroom experience and to draw on theoretical perspectives in the development of their thinking about the teaching and learning of Languages. The module draws on the range and variety of the subject knowledge that Student Teachers bring with them onto the course and enables them to reconfigure this knowledge in the context of their developing experience of teaching and learning in London secondary classrooms.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Languages"]=> string(983) "

        Aims:

        You will develop your understanding of the place of Languages in the school curriculum and your knowledge and understanding of aspects of Languages teaching and learning, based on the premise that learning a FL is not the same as aquiring your mother tongue. 

        Outcomes:

        You will demonstrate understanding of: 

        • the aspects of classroom practice and the relationship between language and culture. 
        • the ability to reflect critically on your classroom experience, 
        • the importance of drawing on theoretical perspectives in the development of your thinking about the teaching and learning of Languages. 

        The module will draw on the range and variety of the subject knowledge that Student Teachers bring with them onto the course and will enable them to reconfigure this knowledge in the context of their developing experience of teaching and learning in London secondary classrooms.  

        " ["Subject Studies - Mathematics"]=> string(1079) "

        Aims:
        You will explore key areas of teaching and learning mathematics. You will engage with a range of relevant research in the field of mathematics education and apply this critically to develop insight into classroom practice.

         Outcomes:
         You will be introduced to mathematics educational research that addresses students' learning across a range of broad domains in school mathematics. The sessions also incorporate pedagogical themes that cut across all domains of mathematics, such as rich questioning and collaborative learning. You will be encouraged to develop a critique of the research, and associated theories of learning, gaining an appreciation of the values, assumptions and beliefs that underlie them, their limitations, and how they have been applied to the development of education policy and classroom practice. You will be introduced to curriculum documentation, policy documents and reports, and you will relate these to the research literature, your own previous classroom experiences and the practice you observe in school.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Mathematics"]=> string(887) "

        Aims:
         You will explore the position of school mathematics within the wider curriculum and within society as a whole. You will engage with a range of relevant research in the wider field of mathematics education and apply this critically to develop insight into classroom practice.

         Outcomes:
         You will study the position of school mathematics within the wider curriculum and within society as a whole, reflecting the diversity that you will experience in mathematics classrooms in London schools. You will be encouraged to reflect critically on your own educational experiences, to engage with recent research in the wider field of mathematics education and to engage critically with broader policy contexts and curriculum developments. The sessions will focus on wider curriculum issues and how these relate to mathematics teaching and learning. 

        " ["Subject Studies - Music"]=> string(902) "

        Aims:

        - you will gain a broad introduction to the foundations of Music Education across the secondary school sector, focusing on a variety of approaches to planning, teaching and assessment both in the context of theMusic classroom and in extra-curricular work. 

         

        Outcomes: 

        You will:

        - consolidate, adapt and extend your knowledge of music teaching and learning as appropriate to the range of school students. 

        - complete a range of tasks, including online group work, a written case study and an arrangement/composition and rehearsal task that will require you to reflect upon your work with school ensembles. 

        - reflect critically on your own experiences as teachers 

        - engage with recent and relevant theories of teaching and learning and develop your subject expertise and skills as musicians and music teachers

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Music"]=> string(514) "

        Aims:

        You will develop an understanding of a range of teaching, learning and assessment methods and to synthesise the findings of your school-based research with recent and relevant theory and policy in the field of Music Education. 

        Outcomes:

        You will:

        - Undertake project work in your school placement

        - Reflect critically on your own experiences as teachers 

        - Develop your subject knowledge and subject pedagogy in the context of your professional practice.

        " ["Subject Studies - Science"]=> string(985) "

        Aims:

        You will receive a broad introduction to the teaching of Science across KS3 and KS4 and to include a specialist subject (biology, chemistry or physics) for KS5. You will focus on specific aspects of the Science curriculum, providing knowledge and understanding of the National Curriculum as a whole and studying issues of continuity and progression within science's big ideas.

        Outcomes: 

        You will:

        - develop your subject knowledge in the context of their developing experience of teaching and learning in London secondary classrooms, including issues of students' alternative conceptions of scientific ideas;

        - reflect critically on your own experience as learners and teachers;

        - engage with recent and relevant theories of learning and teaching as they relate to the field of Science studies;

        - critically and constructively engage with policy contexts and initiatives;

        - critically evaluate school-based experiences.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Science"]=> string(557) "

        Aims: 

        You will broaden your understanding of science teaching in the wider context, especially related to Assessment for Learning (AfL).

        Outcomes: 

        You will:

        - learn about science in a creative and innovative way, allowing you to analyse a sequence of lessons;

        - critically evaluate issues of formative assessment in Science at KS3 and how schools are developing their approach to progression and assessment levels;

         -track students over time to understand more about at their attainment.
         

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Psychology"]=> string(1012) "

        Aim:
         You will explore the wider educational context in which psychology education is located, and the implications of these for teaching, learning, and assessment.

        Outcomes:
         You will:
         - gain an understanding of recent legislation and current developments in educational theory and practice.
         - develop an inclusive approach to the needs of all pupils including, BME (black and minority ethnic) pupils, higher attainers and those with learning difficulties and disabilities, in line with the provision of Equal Opportunities.
         - know about the network of services and professional organisations available to support your teaching and the welfare of your students
         - develop ICT skills relevant to the classroom and professional requirements.
         - use methods of marking and assessment relevant to exam requirements and apply wherever possible the principles of 'assessment for learning'.
         - develop a critical and theoretical approach.

        " ["Subject Studies - Psychology"]=> string(771) "

        Aims:
         You will examine the distinctive qualities and conceptual underpinnings of psychology education, and the implications of these for teaching, learning, and assessment.

        Outcomes:
         You will:
         - become competent and reflective teachers of psychology.
         - develop a critical and theoretical approach to the psychology curriculum, and also sociology, citizenship, PSHE, vocational education and humanities.
         - undertake reading and critical reflection on practice, supported through school-based training and mentoring sessions.
         - explore practical issues such as planning lessons, schemes of work and examination specifications as well as the theory underpinning the development of the psychology curriculum.

        " ["Subject Studies - Religious Education"]=> string(633) "

        Aims:

        You will develop your understanding of the place of Religious Education (RE) in the school curriculum and how this has been shaped and adapted for the 21 Century.  You will gain knowledge and understanding of the influence of national and local policy and of a range of subject-specific pedagogies on RE.

        Outcomes:
         You will:
         - Consider the impact of history and changes in society on the subject of RE.
         - Explore the variety of justifications for and aims of RE and its role in the curriculum.
         - Critically engage with a diverse range of pedagogical approaches to RE.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Religious Education"]=> string(769) "

        Aims:

        You will develop an understanding of a range of teaching, learning and assessment methods in Religious Education (RE) and synthesise the theoretical research gathered for your first assignment with your school-based practice.

        Outcomes:

        You will:

        - Consider the importance of medium term planning and designing a series of sequential lessons which enable pupils to make progress in their knowledge and understanding of the topics studied in RE.

        - Reflect upon the learning which has taken place and evaluate the scheme of work and subject pedagogy applied. 

        - Evaluate the strengths of the scheme designed and consider what changes might be made to enhance the learning of pupils in RE in the future. 
         

        " ["Subject Studies - Social Science"]=> string(706) "

        Aims:
         You will examine the distinctive qualities and conceptual underpinnings of social science education, and the implications of these for teaching, learning, and assessment.

        Outcomes:
         You will:
         - become competent and reflective teachers of social sciences.
         - develop a critical and theoretical approach to the social science curriculum, with a focus on teaching and learning in sociology.
         - critically reflect on your practice.
         - explore practical issues such as planning lessons, schemes of work and examination specifications as well as the theory underpinning the development of the social sciences curriculum and the policy context.

        " ["Wider Educational Studies - Social Science"]=> string(985) "

        Aims:

        You will receive a broad introduction to the teaching of Science across KS3 and KS4 and to include a specialist subject (biology, chemistry or physics) for KS5. You will focus on specific aspects of the Science curriculum, providing knowledge and understanding of the National Curriculum as a whole and studying issues of continuity and progression within science's big ideas.

        Outcomes: 

        You will:

        - develop your subject knowledge in the context of their developing experience of teaching and learning in London secondary classrooms, including issues of students' alternative conceptions of scientific ideas;

        - reflect critically on your own experience as learners and teachers;

        - engage with recent and relevant theories of learning and teaching as they relate to the field of Science studies;

        - critically and constructively engage with policy contexts and initiatives;

        - critically evaluate school-based experiences.

        " }

Egyptian Archaeology BA

The Egyptian Archaeology BA at UCL is the only UK degree to combine the theory and practice of archaeology with the study of Egyptian sites. This specialist degree will prepare you for a wide range of careers both within Egyptian archaeology and heritage studies, and beyond.

Key Information

Programme starts

September 2019
UCAS code
F424
Duration
Full-time: 3 years
Application deadline
15 January 2019
Location
London, Bloomsbury

Entry requirements

A Levels

Grades
ABB
Subjects
No specific subjects.
Please refer to UCL’s list of preferred A level subjects.
GCSEs
English Language and Mathematics at grade C or 5. For UK-based students, a grade C or 5 or equivalent in a foreign language (other than Ancient Greek, Biblical Hebrew or Latin) is required. UCL provides opportunities to meet the foreign language requirement following enrolment, further details at: www.ucl.ac.uk/ug-requirements

Contextual offer

Grades
BBB (more about contextual offers)
Subjects
No specific subjects.

IB Diploma

Points
34
Subjects
A score of 16 points in three higher level subjects, with no score lower than 5.

Contextual offer

Points
32 (more about contextual offers)
Subjects
A total of 15 points in three higher level subjects, with no score below 5.

UK applicants qualifications

For entry requirements with other UK qualifications accepted by UCL, choose your qualification from the list below:

Equivalent qualification

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF) or BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (RQF - teaching from 2016) with Distinction, Distinction, Distinction.

Pass in Access to HE Diploma with a minimum of 28 credits awarded with Merit in the Level 3 units.

D3,M1,M1 in three Cambridge Pre-U Principal Subjects

ABB at Advanced Highers (or AB at Advanced Higher and BBB at Higher)

Successful completion of the WBQ Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate plus 2 GCE A-Levels at grades ABB.

International applications

In addition to A level and International Baccalaureate, UCL considers a wide range of international qualifications for entry to its undergraduate degree programmes.

Undergraduate Preparatory Certificates

UCL Undergraduate Preparatory Certificates (UPCs) are intensive one-year foundation courses for international students of high academic potential who are aiming to gain access to undergraduate degree programmes at UCL and other top UK universities.

Typical UPC students will be high achievers in a 12-year school system which does not meet the standard required for direct entry to UCL.

For more information see: www.ucl.ac.uk/upc.

English language requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency. Information about the evidence required, acceptable qualifications and test providers can be found on our English language requirements page.

The English language level for this programme is: Good

A variety of English language programmes are offered at the UCL Centre for Languages & International Education.

Degree benefits

  • UCL is ranked the second best place to study archaeology in the UK by the Guardian University Guide 2018.

  • The Institute of Archaeology's degree programmes offer an unrivalled variety of optional modules, covering a very diverse range of archaeological topics in both a theoretical and a practical manner.

  • Optional modules include everything from Roman Art and Architecture to Pyrotechnology, Plants and Archaeology, Human Evolution, and Archaeology and Climate Change.

  • The degree includes 70 days of funded fieldwork - both in the UK and overseas (from Spain, France and Montenegro to Belize, China and Uganda, to name a few).

Degree structure

In each year of your degree you will take a number of individual modules, normally valued at 15 or 30 credits, adding up to a total of 120 credits for the year. Modules are assessed in the academic year in which they are taken. The balance of compulsory and optional modules varies from programme to programme and year to year. A 30-credit module is considered equivalent to 15 credits in the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS).

Most of the degree is structured around a combination of core and optional modules. In your first year, you will receive a solid grounding in both the practical and theoretical methods in archaeology, as well as an introduction to major issues in Egyptian archaeology and writing.

The second and third years provide a more advanced understanding of Egyptian archaeology and allow you to develop your own specialised interests by choosing optional modules in particular subject areas.

In the third year you are given the chance to reflect critically on your fieldwork experience during the degree through a fieldwork portfolio, and write a 10,000-word dissertation on a detailed subject that you will choose with the help of a supervisor.

Modules

An indicative guide to the structure of this programme, year by year.

Core or compulsory module(s)

Field Methods
Introduction to Archaeology
Introduction to Egyptian and Near Eastern Archaeology
People and Environments
Sites and Artefacts
Texts in Archaeology
World Archaeology: the Deep History of Human Societies

Optional modules

All first year modules are compulsory.

Core or compulsory module(s)

Archaeology of Ancient Egypt
Current Issues in Archaeological Theory
Intermediate Middle Egyptian Texts
Middle Egyptian Language and Texts
Research and Presentation Skills in Archaeology

Optional modules

You will select 1.0 credit of optional modules in Archaeology.

Core or compulsory module(s)

Archaeology in the World
Field Archaeology
Dissertation relating to Ancient Egypt

Optional modules

You will select 1.5 credits of optional modules in Archaeology and a further 0.5 credits in either Archaeology or a related subject.


Your learning

You will be taught using a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, either field or laboratory-based. Full use is made of our extensive teaching and reference collections and close connections to the national museums and collections of London.

Assessment

Coursework, typically 1,500-2,500-word essays, is used to assess most modules. Most compulsory modules and some optional modules involve an examination element too. The completion of 70 days' fieldwork is a requirement for all archaeology students.

Detailed course descriptions are available on the department website: Egyptian Archaeology BA.

Careers

Throughout the degree, which includes 70 days of fieldwork, students develop the ability to work collaboratively and effectively within teams as well as working independently in order to execute research. Students develop strong research and analytical skills and an appreciation of the importance of recovering primary data through practical experience.

Students learn to communicate effectively verbally, visually and in writing to diverse audiences and develop a sensitivity to different cultures.

Our graduates go on to work in a diverse range of fields from archaeology (fieldwork, research and academia), heritage, museums, the UK civil service and police, law, engineering, business - the possibilities are extremely wide and varied.

UCL is commited to helping you get the best start after graduation. Read more about how UCL Careers and UCL Innovation and Enterprise can help you find employment or learn about entrepreneurship.

Fees and funding

Tuition fees

The fees indicated are for undergraduate entry in the 2019/20 academic year. The UK/EU fees shown are for the first year of the programme at UCL only. Fees for future years may be subject to an inflationary increase. The Overseas fees shown are the fees that will be charged to 2019/20 entrants for each year of study on the programme, unless otherwise indicated below.

UK/EU students
£9,250 (2019/20)
Overseas students
£26,740 (2019/20)

Full details of UCL's tuition fees, tuition fee policy and potential increases to fees can be found on the UCL Students website.

Additional costs

If you are concerned by potential additional costs for books, equipment, etc. on this programme, please get in touch with the relevant departmental contact (details given on this page).

Funding

Various funding options are available, including student loans, scholarships and bursaries. UK students whose household income falls below a certain level may also be eligible for a non-repayable bursary or for certain scholarships. Please see the Fees and funding pages for more details.

Additional costs

If you are concerned by potential additional costs for books, equipment, etc. on this programme, please get in touch with the relevant departmental contact (details given on this page).

Departmental scholarships

Funding opportunities relevant to the department may appear in this section when they are available. Please check carefully or confirm with the programme contact to ensure they apply to this degree programme.

The Scholarships and Funding website lists scholarships and funding schemes available to UCL students. These may be open to all students, or restricted to specific nationalities, regions or academic department.

Application and next steps

Your application

We use predicted grades, references, previous academic records and the personal statement on your application to assess your suitability for the programme. You should demonstrate your interest in studying archaeology and explain the measures you have taken to sustain your interest in the past. Evidence of interests and activities beyond the school curriculum will also be of benefit.

How to apply

Application for admission should be made through UCAS (the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service). Applicants currently at school or college will be provided with advice on the process; however, applicants who have left school or who are based outside the United Kingdom may obtain information directly from UCAS.

Application deadline: 15 January 2019



Selection

The UCAS application forms are assessed by a central UCL team and the Institute of Archaeology. The personal statement and predicted grades are used for assessment and sometimes extra information is requested.

Once an offer has been made applicants, unless living overseas, are invited to attend a Post Offer Open Day where they will meet staff and students and will be able to see all of the facilities on site at the UCL Institute of Archaeology and UCL.

Additionally, the open day allows you to learn about our archaeological artefacts, meet specific tutors, tour UCL and the institute, and find out more about the degree programmes, resources and facilities we offer. Alternative arrangements can be made for those living overseas.

For further information on UCL's selection process see: Selection of students.