XClose

Department of Political Science

Home
Menu

Dr Eleanor Woodhouse

Ellie
Lecturer in Public Policy
Room:
3.04, 36-38 Gordon Sq.
Email: eleanor.woodhouse@ucl.ac.uk
Website
Biography

Eleanor is Lecturer in Public Policy. She joined the Department in 2020 from the European University Institute (EUI) where she was a Max Weber postdoctoral fellow. Eleanor received her Ph.D. in Public Policy and Administration (cum laude) from Bocconi University in 2019, before joining the Department of Economics at the EUI for her postdoctoral fellowship.

She holds a Master’s degree in Modern European Studies from UCL and a Bachelor’s degree in French and Italian from Balliol College, Oxford University. She received a Fulbright-Schuman fellowship in 2016/2017 to conduct research at Harvard University’s Department of Economics.

Eleanor spent two years working for the European Commission’s Directorate-General of Education and Culture. This experience shaped the direction of her research, which lies at the interface between political institutions and public administration.

Research

Eleanor’s research spans comparative politics, public administration and public policy. She aims to better understand how agency relations function in modern governance.

Her current projects fall into three strands. In the first, Eleanor explores the political determinants of the adoption of public-private partnerships (PPPs). In a series of papers and a Cambridge Element manuscript (under contract), she theorises and analyses the distributive patterns of PPPs, the way in which their networks are modelled, and their effect on voters.

In the second, Eleanor investigates how national politics can affect local bureaucratic outcomes. Using data on a political scandal in Italy, she provides evidence that a sudden increase in electoral accountability for national deputies can increase corruption amongst local public officials.

In the third, she uses a novel within-country research design to show that changing the national electoral rule from majoritarian to proportional increased the number of women elected, while not decreasing the overall quality of politicians.

Publications

Selected:

Please see https://eleanorfwoodhouse.com/research/ for more details.

Teaching
  • Undergraduate:
  • Policy Making
  • Graduate:
  • Theories and Actors of the Policy Process