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Prof. Sarah Broadie

Sedley

With great sadness we report the death of the eminent ancient philosopher Sarah Broadie, current Keeling Scholar in Residence (since 2018) and Honorary Professor in Philosophy at UCL, and Professor (Philosophy) at St. Andrews. At UCL, Sarah was a very active Keeling Scholar in Residence. She supervised graduate students, was a frequent attendee at the ancient philosophy seminars at the Institute for Classical Studies, and taught a graduate seminar in ancient philosophy at UCL each year – the topic for her first seminar at UCL being the subject of her most recent book, Plato’s Sun-like Good, published this summer (2021) with Cambridge University Press https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/platos-sunlike-good/DE4733DA8E4A6F62F1982AEA745BDFF2 . Over her long and distinguished career, Sarah authored 8 books and numerous articles, mostly in ancient philosophy, supervised a large number of graduate students, and, after holding appointments at Edinburgh, Yale, Rutgers, the University of Texas (at Austin), and Princeton, joined the St. Andrews Philosophy Department in 2001, where she was Professor of Moral Philosophy and Wardlaw Professor. A huge loss to the philosophical community, Sarah will be sorely missed, and long remembered for her philosophical insight and achievements, sharp wit, and personal warmth.

A memorial notice by John Haldane and Moira Gilruth can be read here: https://leiterreports.typepad.com/blog/2021/08/in-memoriam-sarah-broadie-1941-2021.html

 


Select Publications

  • Nature and Divinity in Plato's Timaeus (Cambridge University Press, 2012)
  • Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics: Philosophical Introduction and Commentary, with a new translation by Christopher Rowe (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2002)
  • Ethics with Aristotle (Oxford University Press, New York, 1991)
  • (as Waterlow) Nature, Change, and Agency in Aristotle's Physics: a philosophical study (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1984)
  • (as Waterlow) Passage and Possibility: a study of Aristotle's modal concepts (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1984)