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BA Linguistics (International Programme)

UCAS Code: Q101

See a full list of Linguistics modules here

Do you find language and communication fascinating? Do you enjoy solving puzzles? Would you like to learn about the languages of the world, and in doing so learn about how the human mind works? Do you have broad interests, from the language arts through the sciences?

The BA Linguistics (International Programme) gives you an education in various aspects of language. At the core are courses about sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics and pragmatics) and pronunciation (phonetics and phonology), but you will also be given the opportunity to explore other themes, such as language acquisition or language processing. 

The programme includes a year abroad in your third year at one of our partner institutions.

Students frequently comment on the friendly atmosphere and accessible academic staff. The BA Linguistics programme had a 93% overall student satisfaction rate (sector average: 88) in the National Student Survey. Our graduates report an above average employment rate and starting salary.

Click below to see a short clip about Linguistics at UCL and hear from some BA Linguistics students about the degree programme. Click on the tabs for more detailed information about the degree, or click here for information on the three year BA Linguistics or the BSc Experimental Linguistics.

Linguistics at UCL

 

 

BA linguistics

 

 

Content

Degree Benefits

  • Gain a broadly-based training in linguistics and phonetics together with the opportunity to explore other themes, such as language acquisition and language processing.
  • UCL is known worldwide for its teaching and research in linguistics; the work of our staff appears in internationally acclaimed journals and books.
  • Our focus on small-group teaching helps develop a friendly and supportive atmosphere. LingSoc, the linguistics student society, runs a mentoring scheme whereby second-year or final-year students support new students.
  • You will have access to extensive computer facilities and to a specialised on-site library in addition to UCL's main library.

In the first year your courses are all compulsory, providing a foundation in linguistics and helping you assess where your own interests and strengths lie. In your second and third years you choose from a range of intermediate and advanced courses within a requirement to complete courses in the three core areas of: Meaning (Semantics and Pragmatics); Pronunciation (Phonetics and Phonology); and Sentence Structure (Syntax). You can also choose courses in psycholinguistics, including language acquisition. In your final year, you will undertake a research project, involving a deep and sustained study of a subject in which you are especially interested.

In the second and final year, you can also take options offered outside Linguistics; for example, many students choose to take a language course taught by the UCL Language Centre.

Your Learning

Teaching is mainly delivered through lectures and small-group teaching (tutorials in which you meet with a group of between five and 12 students and a staff member to discuss topics covered in the lecture) as well as a virtual learning environment. Some courses also involve workshops.

Assessment

Each course is assessed and examined separately, often by a combination of essays, exercises and examinations. Your performance in a course is always assessed in the same academic year in which you take it.

Advanced linguistics

You might like to have a look at the recording of the talk given by Professor Noam Chomsky when he visited us in October 2011 at http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/events/2011/10/17/noam-chomsky-on-the-poverty-of-the-stimulus/.

Structure

Teaching is delivered through a combination of lectures, small-group teaching (tutorials or backup classes) and material and a virtual learning environment. Some modules also involve workshops or practical classes. Typically, each module involves a weekly lecture of one or two hours, a one hour backup class in which you meet with a group of between five and 12 students and a staff member to discuss topics covered in the lecture, and a virtual learning environment where you can access module material, a module discussion forum, and other activities.
In the first year your modules are all compulsory, providing a foundation in linguistics and helping you assess where your own interests and strengths lie. In your second and third years you choose from a range of intermediate and advanced modules within a requirement to complete modules in the three core areas of: Meaning (Semantics and Pragmatics); Pronunciation (Phonetics and Phonology); and Sentence Structure (Syntax). Additionally, in your third year, you will undertake a research project, involving a deep and sustained study of a subject in which you are especially interested.

In the second and in the final year, you can also take module options offered outside Linguistics, and there is a huge choice of modules including language courses taught by the UCL Language Centre.

Structure of the BA Linguistics (International Programme)

YEAR ONEYEAR TWOYEAR ABROAD FINAL YEAR
  • Two introductory modules in Meaning
  • Two introductory modules in Pronunciation
  • Two introductory modules in Sentence Structure
  • Two general introductory modules in linguistics and language acquisition
  • Two compulsory intermediate modules
  • One intermediate module in Pronunciation
  • One intermediate module in Sentence Structure
  • Two additional linguistics option modules
  • Two electives from Linguistics or any university-wide electives

Modules agreed in consultation with host institution
*Any module taken during this year bears no credit and it will not count towards your final degree result.

  • Research project
  • Three advanced modules in any of the core areas of linguistics (Meaning, Phonetics and Phonology, Syntax)
  • One additional linguistics option module
  • Two electives from Linguistics or any university-wide electives
List of Modules
Introductory Modules
  • Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics A
  • Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics B
  • Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology A
  • Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology B
  • Introduction to Generative Grammar
  • Core Issues in Linguistics
  • Introduction to Children's Language Development
Intermediate Modules
  • Semantic Theory
  • Intermediate Pragmatics
  • Principles of Phonetic Sciences
  • Intermediate Phonology
  • Intermediate Generative Grammar: Locality
  • Intermediate Generative Grammar: Word Order
Year Abroad - Module selection depends on host university
Final Year Modules

Long Essay/Project

Meaning core area

  • Issues in Pragmatics
  • Semantic-Pragmatic Development
  • Advanced Semantic Theory
  • Advanced Semantic Theory B

Pronunciation Core Area

  • Advanced Phonological Theory A
  • Advanced Phonological Theory B
  • Phonetic Theory

Sentence Structure Core Area

  • Readings in Syntax
  • Current Issues in Syntax
Optional Modules (not all of these modules are taught every year)
  • Neurolinguistics
  • Animal Communication and Human Language
  • Language Evolution
  • Morphology
  • Sociolinguistics
  • Psycholinguistics: Stages in Normal Language Development
  • Psycholinguistics: General Processing
  • Bi/Multilingualism: Development and Cognition 
  • Linguistics of Sign Languages
  • Stuttering

Students in the second and final year can also take optional modules outside Linguistics, including:


Time table
See www.ucl.ac.uk/timetable or click on the above module details for a link to the module timetable.

Year Abroad

We have a range of partner institutions, all elite departments in universities with excellent academic reputations in Linguistics, where all or a substantial amount of teaching is carried out in English. We currently have exchange links with Linguistics departments at seven universities:

  • University of Arizona
  • University of California
  • Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • University of Massachusetts
  • McGill University (Montreal)
  • University of Sydney
  • University of Tübingen
  • University of Utrecht
  • Ca' Foscari University of Venice
  • Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan

UCL also has exchange agreements with overseas institutions that cover all departments. These exchanges are reviewed periodically and are thus subject to change.

Other overseas exchanges are available through UCL-level links. These cover all departments, and application for places is accordingly competitive.

Our departmental exchange agreements normally allow for up to two UCL students to attend each institution each year. When you apply to go on your year abroad, UCL’s Study Abroad Office will ask you to list three chosen destinations in order of preference. Which of these preferences you get allocated to is decided by the Study Abroad Office and depends on the quality of your application. Please note that this means you are not guaranteed to be allocated to your top preference

Important:

Information on the financial side of the year abroad can be found at www.ucl.ac.uk/studyabroad/finance.

Staff

Programme Director: Dr Klaus Abels

Teaching staff (NB: staff may occasionally be absent for a term or more on research or other leave)

In addition, we can call on the support of Teaching Fellows and Postgraduate Teaching Assistants.

Application

Fees and Funding

Information about fees, funding arrangements and UCL scholarships can be found at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/undergraduate/degrees/linguistics-international-ba/

Application process

All applications must be made via UCAS.

Entry requirements

For entry requirements, please see http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/undergraduate/degrees/linguistics-international-ba/

Careers

Linguistics connects with many other disciplines and many graduates go on to work in these areas, e.g. teaching languages, especially English as a first or foreign language, speech therapy, advertising or the media. A number of linguistics graduates from UCL carry on linguistics at graduate level often with a view to pursuing an academic career. You can find information on the career paths taken by some of our alumni at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/pals/research/linguistics/students/careers/.

In addition to subject-specific skills, you will also acquire the analytical, investigative, communication and study skills essential for most graduate careers, which could include law, computing, commerce and industry.

Information on careers can be found at UCL Careers. Information and statistics on career paths are also available at prospects.ac.uk. Our graduates report above average employment rates and starting salaries.

You may read further information by clicking the below PDF:

Destinations

First destinations of recent graduates of this programme include:

  • Full-time student, MPhil Linguistics at Cambridge University
  • Junior Project Manager, Pro-Active London
  • Full-time student, MA in Modern Languages at the University of Oxford
  • English Tutor, Self-employed
What our students say

Here is some feedback from new students:

  • "Since I have never studied Linguistics before, I didn't really know what to expect. I am positively astonished about the many different ways in which Language can be studied!"
  • "It is better than I expected. There is plenty of time to complete assignments and there is a great support system (mentors and back up tutors) to ensure we understand the material."

And here is some feedback from students who have graduated:

  • "I really valued the staff/student dynamic, the relaxed atmosphere of the department, and being separate from main campus. Because it's such a small department, we became a little linguistics family!"
  • "Excellent facilities inc a cluster room with more free computers than the sum of the main library and science library. Really interesting optional modules."
  • "Everyone was very friendly and approachable and this contributed to a very warm and welcoming environment to study in."
  • The best aspects were the "optional modules, such as Sociolinguistics, and Animal Communication, and how most modules were a mixture of assessment and exams."
Find Out More

We organise a number of Open Days for prospective students who have already applied via UCAS, and will contact applicants to make the necessary arrangements.

We also have a virtual tour of Chandler House available to view here.

 

Contact

For further information about academic entry on to this programme, and language requirements, please contact Undergraduate Admissions:

undergraduate-admissions@ucl.ac.uk

For general enquiries about undergraduate Linguistics programmes, please contact the Linguistics Teaching office:

pals.lingteachingoffice@ucl.ac.uk